The Master

George Balanchine: The Ballet Maker by Robert Gottlieb

All in the Dances: A Brief Life of George Balanchine by Terry Teachout

The Wise Warrior

George Washington Remembers: Reflections on the French and Indian War edited by Fred Anderson

His Excellency: George Washington by Joseph J. Ellis

Colleges: An Endangered Species?

Stover at Yale by Owen Johnson

The Future of the Public University in America: Beyond the Crossroads by James J. Duderstadt and Farris W. Womack

The Uses of the University by Clark Kerr

Shakespeare, Einstein, and the Bottom Line: The Marketing of Higher Education by David L. Kirp

Survival of the Smallest

In Our Hearts We Were Giants: The Remarkable Story of the Lilliput Troupe—A Dwarf Family’s Survival of the Holocaust by Yehuda Koren and Eilat Negev

The Producers

They Made America: From the Steam Engine to the Search Engine: Two Centuries of Innovators by Harold Evans, with Gail Buckland and David Lefer

An Empire of Wealth: The Epic History of American Economic Power by John Steele Gordon

Growing Public, Volume 1: Social Spending and Economic Growth Since the Eighteenth Century by Peter H. Lindert

Bill of Wrongs

Perilous Times: Free Speech in Wartime from the Sedition Act of 1798 to the War on Terrorism by Geoffrey R. Stone

The People Themselves: Popular Constitutionalism and Judicial Review by Larry D. Kramer

I Is Someone Else’

Chronicles, Volume One by Bob Dylan

Studio A: The Bob Dylan Reader edited by Benjamin Hedin

Lyrics: 1962–2001 by Bob Dylan

Tarantula by Bob Dylan


Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Toni Bentley danced with the New York City Ballet for ten years and is the author of five books, including Winter Season: A Dancer’s Journal, Sisters of Salome, and The Surrender: An Erotic Memoir. She is the recipient of a 2008 Guggenheim Fellowship and is currently working on a book about Balanchine’s ballet Serenade. (November 2009)

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at ­Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His forthcoming book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His writing and other work can be found at

Andrew Delbanco is Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is College: What It Was, Is, and Should Be. (July 2015)

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. His latest book is Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.

John Golding (1929–2012) was a British painter and art historian. He taught at the Courtauld Institute and the Royal College of Art. Among his many books was Cubism: A History and an Analysis, which refuted the notion that Cubism represented a break with the realist tradition. Golding also curated exhibitions on both sides of the Atlantic, including Picasso: Painter/Sculpter and Matisse Picasso.

Andrew Hacker teaches political science and mathematics at Queens College. His new book, The Math Myth and Other STEM ­Delusions, will appear next March.
 (July 2015)

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. He is the author of several books, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, and The Global Soul. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and other publications and his most recent book is The Man Within My Head.

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and Distinguished Professor of Economics at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008.
 (December 2015)

Jeff Madrick is the director of the Bernard L. Schwartz Re­discovering Government Initiative at the Century Foundation and editor of Challenge Magazine. His new book is Seven Bad Ideas: How Mainstream Economists Damaged America and the World.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Marie Morgan, author of Chariot of Fire, is a historian of nineteenth-century America who frequently collaborates with Edmund Morgan in writing history. (June 2011)

Luc Sante is the author of Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Kill All Your Darlings, and Folk Photography. He has translated Félix Fénéon’s Novels in Three Lines and written the introduction to George Simenon’s The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (both available as NYRB Classics). He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College. His essay in the October 22, 2015 issue is drawn from his new book, The Other Paris, to be published in October by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Mark Strand, who died late last year, was a poet and artist. He was named Poet Laureate of the United States in 1990 and he won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1999. (June 2015)

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. He is the author, most recently, of The Future of the Catholic Church with 
Pope Francis.