Contents


Very Bad News

Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed by Jared Diamond

Catastrophe: Risk and Response by Richard A. Posner

The Endangered University

Universities in the Marketplace: The Commercialization of Higher Education by Derek Bok

The Guardians: Kingman Brewster, His Circle,and the Rise of the Liberal Establishment by Geoffrey Kabaservice

Distinctively American: The Residential Liberal Arts Colleges edited by Steven Koblik and Stephen R. Graubard

Stover at Yale by Owen Johnson

Liberal Education and the Public Interest by James O. Freedman

He’s Back!

Winning the Future: A 21st Century Contract with America by Newt Gingrich

The Enduring Revolution: How the Contract with America Continues to Shape the Nation by Major Garrett

The Republican Revolution 10 Years Later: Smaller Government or Business as Usual? edited by Chris Edwards and John Samples

Contributors

Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and Slate. Her most recent book is Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944–1956.
 (June 2013)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications.

Andrew Delbanco is Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia. He is working on a book about the United States in the 1850s.
 (March 2014)

Elizabeth Drew is a regular contributor to The New York Review. Her most recent book, Washington Journal: Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall, was published in May.

 (September 2014)

Richard Eder reviews books for various publications. (March 2005)

Clifford Geertz (1926–2006) was an anthropologist. Widely recognized as the most influential American anthropologist of the twentieth century, Geertz championed the role of symbols in the creation and interpretation of social meaning. His many books include Peddlers and Princes: Social Development and Economic Change in Two Indonesian Towns and Available Light: Anthropological Reflections on Philosophical Topics.

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

Alexander Keyssar is Stirling Professor of History and Social Policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He is the author, most recently, of The Right to Vote: The Contested History of Democracy in the United States. He is currently writing a history of American electoral rules and institutions. (March 2005)

Michael Kimmelman is Chief Architecture Critic of The New York Times.
 (June 2014)

Stephen Kinzer, a former New York Times bureau chief in Nica­ragua, is a visiting fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown. His new book is The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War. (December 2013)

Larry McMurtry lives in Archer City, Texas. His novels include The Last Picture Show, Terms of Endearment, Lonesome Dove (winner of the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction), Folly and Gloryand Rhino Ranch. His nonfiction works include a biography of Crazy Horse, Walter Benjamin at the Dairy Queen, Paradise, Sacagawea’s Nickname: Essays on the American West and, most recently, Custer.

Bill Moyers is the former host of NOW with Bill Moyers on PBS. He was one of the organizers of the Peace Corps, spokesperson for President Lyndon Johnson, publisher of Newsday, senior correspondent for CBS News, and producer of many of public television’s groundbreaking series. He is the winner of more than thirty Emmy Awards, and the author of the best-selling books Listening to America, A World of Ideas, and Healing and the Mind. He lives in New York.

Alan Ryan’s collected essays The Making of Modern Liberalism and his two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought were published last year.

Oliver Sacks is a physician and the author of ten books, the most recent of which is Hallucinations. He is a professor of ­neurology at NYU School of Medicine and a visiting professor at the University of Warwick.