Contents


Ghosts

The Living Unknown Soldier: A Story of Grief and the Great War by Jean-Yves Le Naour, translated from the French by Penny Allen

Warriors: Portraits from the Battlefield by Max Hastings

Love of Fact

Treasures from Olana: Landscapes by Frederic Edwin Church Catalog of the exhibit by Kevin J. Avery, with anintroduction by John Wilmerding

The Best and the Brightest

One of a Kind: The Rise and Fall of Stuey “The Kid” Ungar, the World’s Greatest Poker Player by Nolan Dalla and Peter Alson, with a foreword by Mike Sexton

The Professor, the Banker, and the Suicide King: Inside the Richest Poker Game of All Time by Michael Craig

When a Scorpion Meets a Scorpion

Life in the Undergrowth by David Attenborough

The Smaller Majority: The Hidden World of the Animals That Dominate the Tropics by Piotr Naskrecki

Locust: The Devastating Rise and Mysterious Disappearance of the Insect That Shaped the American Frontier by Jeffrey A. Lockwood

The Health Care Crisis and What to Do About It

Can We Say No? The Challenge of Rationing Health Care by Henry J. Aaron and William B. Schwartz, with Melissa Cox

The Health Care Mess: How We Got into It and What It Will Take to Get Out by Julius Richmond and Rashi Fein

Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise: Five Steps to a Better Health Care System by John F. Cogan, R. Glenn Hubbard, and Daniel P. Kessler

Contributors

Al Alvarez is the author of Risky Business, a selection of essays, many of which first appeared in The New York Review of Books.

Neal Ascherson is the author of The Struggles for Poland, The Black Sea, and Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.


Elizabeth Bishop (1911–1979) was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award, and a National Book Critics Circle Award for her poetry. The poems in this issue will appear in Edgar Allan Poe & The Juke-Box: Uncollected Poems, Drafts, and Fragments, edited by Alice Quinn, to be published this month by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. (March 2006)

David Cole is the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law Center. He is the author of several books, including The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009), Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror (with Jules Lobel, 2007) and Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism (2003).

Denis Donoghue is University Professor at New York University, where he holds the Henry James Chair of English and American Letters. His works include The Practice of Reading, Words Alone: The Poet T.S. Eliot, and The American Classics.

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Tim Flannery is a founding member of the Climate Council and 
former Chief Commissioner of the Australian Climate Commission. His most recent book is Among the Islands: Adventures in the Pacific. (August 2014)

Clifford Geertz (1926–2006) was an anthropologist. Widely recognized as the most influential American anthropologist of the twentieth century, Geertz championed the role of symbols in the creation and interpretation of social meaning. His many books include Peddlers and Princes: Social Development and Economic Change in Two Indonesian Towns and Available Light: Anthropological Reflections on Philosophical Topics.

John Gross (1935–2011) was an English editor and critic. From 1974 to 1981, he was editor of The Times Literary Supplement; he also served as senior book editor and critic at The New York Times. His memoir, A Double Thread, was published in 2001.

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Princeton. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008. (July 2014)

James McPherson is George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1989, and, most recently, War on the Waters: The Union and Confederate Navies, 1861–1865.


W.S. Merwin was born in New York City in 1927 and grew up in Union City, New Jersey, and in Scranton, Pennsylvania. From 1949 to 1951 he worked as a tutor in France, Portugal, and Majorca. He has since lived in many parts of the world, most recently on Maui in the Hawaiian Islands. He is the author of many books of poems, prose, and translations and has received both the Pulitzer and the Bollingen Prizes for poetry, among numerous other awards. His new poetry collection is The Moon Before Morning.

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit: Angstrom, he two of which, Rabbit is Richand Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Robin Wells is the coauthor, along with Paul Krugman, of Economics and has taught economics at Princeton, Stanford Business School, and MIT.
 (July 2012)