Contents


Margaret Atwood’s Tale

Moral Disorder by Margaret Atwood

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood, with an introduction by Valerie Martin

Survival: A Thematic Guide to Canadian Literature by Margaret Atwood, with a new introduction by the author

Surfacing by Margaret Atwood, with a new introduction by the author

Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood, with a new introduction by the author

Lincoln at War

Lincoln: A Life of Purpose and Power by Richard Carwardine

Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln by Doris Kearns Goodwin

Defiant Iran

Confronting Iran: The Failure of American Foreign Policy and the Next Great Crisis in the Middle East by Ali M. Ansari

Hidden Iran: Paradox and Power in the Islamic Republic by Ray Takeyh

Contributors

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.

April Bernard’s most recent books are Romanticism, a ­collection of poems, and Miss Fuller, a novel. (October 2014)

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. His two new books, The Intellectual Life of Edmund Burke: From the Sublime and Beautiful to American Independence and Moral Imagination, a collection of his essays, were published earlier this year.
 (December 2014)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His book Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


David Gilmour’s books include The Last Leopard: A Life of Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa and The Pursuit of Italy: A 
History of a Land, Its Regions, and Their Peoples.
 (March 2014)

Paul Kennedy, the J. Richardson Dilworth Professor of History and Director of International Security Studies at Yale, is the author and editor of fifteen books, including The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers. His latest book is The Parliament of Man: The Past, Present, and Future of the United Nations. (November 2006)

Joseph Lelyveld is a former correspondent and Editor of The New York Times. His latest book is Great Soul: Mahatma Gandhi and His Struggle with India. (September 2014)

Aryeh Neier is President Emeritus of the Open Society Foundations. He was for twelve years the Executive Director of ­Human Rights Watch.


Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His most recent book is Stolen Glimpses, Captive ­Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.


Joyce Carol Oates is the Roger S. Berlind Professor in the Lewis Arts Center at Princeton. Her newest story ­collection is Lovely, Dark, Deep.


Darryl Pinckney, a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. He has worked for Robert Wilson on various theatrical projects, most recently an adaptation of Daniil Kharms’s The Old Woman.

John R. Searle is the Slusser Professor of Philosophy at 
the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book is ­Making the Social World.
 (October 2014)

Michael Wood is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His books include Literature and the Taste of Knowledge and Yeats and Violence

Christopher de Bellaigue was born in London in 1971 and has worked as a journalist in the Middle East and South Asia since 1994. His first book, In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs: A Memoir of Iran, was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize. His latest book is Patriot of Persia: Muhammad Mossadegh and a Tragic Anglo-American Coup. He lives in Tehran with his wife and two children.