Contents


Reconstructing Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan: Fate, Freedom, and the Making of History by John Patrick Diggins

Reagan: A Life in Letters edited by Kiron K. Skinner, Annelise Anderson, and Martin Anderson, with a foreword by George P. Shultz

Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years by Robert M. Collins

The Reagan Imprint: Ideas in American Foreign Policy from the Collapse of Communism to the War on Terror by John Arquilla

How Not to Deal with North Korea

A Moment of Crisis: Jimmy Carter, the Power of a Peacemaker, and North Korea’s Nuclear Ambitions by Marion V. Creekmore Jr.

Nuclear Showdown: North Korea Takes On the World by Gordon G. Chang

Rogue Regime: Kim Jong Il and the Looming Threat of North Korea by Jasper Becker

Did the Revolution Have to Fail?

Revolution in Hungary: The 1956 Budapest Uprising by Erich Lessing, with texts by George Konrad, François Fejtö, Erich Lessing, and Nicolas Bauquet

Twelve Days: The Story of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution by Victor Sebestyen

Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt by Charles Gati

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956: Myths and Realities by László Eörsi, translated from the Hungarian by Mario D. Fenyo

A Good Comrade: János Kádár, Communism and Hungary by Roger Gough

Contributors

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.
 (November 2016)

John Banville’s new novel, Mrs. Osmond, will be published in November. (November 2017)

Richard Bernstein was Time’s Bureau Chief in China and a foreign correspondent for The New York Times. His most recent book is China 1945: Mao’s Revolution and America’s Fateful Choice. (September 2017)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Christian Caryl is the Editor of the DemocracyPost blog at The Washington Post and the author of Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the Twenty-first Century. (November 2017)

Clare Cavanagh is Frances Hooper Professor in the Arts and Humanities and Chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Northwestern.
 (November 2017)

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Melvin Konner is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Anthropology at Emory. His most recent book, The Evolution of Childhood: Relationships, Emotion, Mind, was published in paperback in November. (December 2011)

Daniel Mendelsohn, a longtime contributor to The New York Review, teaches at Bard. His new memoir, An Odyssey: A ­Father, a Son, and an Epic, will be published in September.
 (April 2017)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Jennifer Schuessler is an editor at The New York Times Book Review. (March 2011)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His latest book is Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry. (November 2017)

Eliot Weinberger is the editor of the Calligrams series published by the Chinese University of Hong Kong Press and New York Review Books and the literary editor of the Murty Classical Library of India. Among his books of essays are An Elemental Thing and the forthcoming The Ghosts of Birds.
 (February 2016)

Adam Zagajewski is a Polish poet and the author of 
twelve volumes of verse, seven of which have been translated into English. His new book, Slight Exaggeration: An Essay, was ­published in April. (May 2017)

Christopher de Bellaigue’s most recent book is The Islamic Enlightenment: The Struggle Between Faith and Reason, 1798 to Modern Times. (July 2017)