Contents


We Are All Romans Now

Art of the Classical World in the Metropolitan Museum of Art: Greece, Cyprus, Etruria, Rome by Carlos A. Picón,Joan R. Mertens, Elizabeth J. Milleker, Christopher S. Lightfoot, and Seán Hemingway, with contributions from Richard De Puma

The Pleasures of Casanova

History of My Life by Giacomo Casanova, translated from the French by Willard R. Trask

History of My Life by Giacomo Casanova, translated from the French by Willard R. Trask, abridged by Peter Washington, with an introduction by John Julius Norwich

Casanova’s Women: The Great Seducer and the Women He Loved by Judith Summers

How Democrats Should Talk

The Greatest Story Ever Sold: The Decline and Fall of Truth from 9/11 to Katrina by Frank Rich

Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear by Dr. Frank Luntz

The Political Brain: The Role of Emotion in Deciding the Fate of the Nation by Drew Westen

The Reader in the Ring

Tunney: Boxing’s Brainiest Champ and His Upset of the Great Jack Dempsey by Jack Cavanaugh

Ringside: A Treasury of Boxing Reportage by Budd Schulberg, with an introduction by Hugh McIlvanney

Contributors

David Brion Davis is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale and Director Emeritus of Yale’s Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition. He is the author of Inhuman Bondage: The Rise and Fall of Slavery in the New World.

Michael Dirda is a columnist for The Washington Post Book World. His most recent book is Browsings: A Year of Reading, Collecting, and Living with Books.
 (December 2016)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. His most recent book is Free Speech: Ten Principles for a Connected World.
 (December 2017)

Anthony Grafton is Henry Putnam University Professor of History and the Humanities at Princeton University. His most recent book is The Culture of Correction in Renaissance Europe.


Stephen Greenblatt is Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard. His new book, The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve, will be published in September. (April 2017)

Richard Horton is a physician. He edits The Lancet, a weekly medical journal based in London and New York. He is also a visiting professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.

Stephen Kinzer, a former New York Times bureau chief in Nica­ragua, is a visiting fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown. His new book is The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War. (December 2013)

Nicholas D. Kristof is a columnist for The New York Times. His most recent book, with his wife, Sheryl WuDunn, is A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity.
 (April 2016)

David Lodge is a novelist and critic and Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, England. His novels include Changing Places, Small World, Nice Work, and A Man of Parts. His most recent works of criticism are Consciousness and the Novel and The Year of Henry James.

David Margolick is the author of Beyond Glory: Joe Louis vs. Max Schmeling, and a World on the Brink. He is a contributing editor at Vanity Fair. (May 2007)

Daniel Mendelsohn, a longtime contributor to The New York Review, teaches at Bard. His new memoir, An Odyssey: A ­Father, a Son, and an Epic, will be published in September.
 (April 2017)

Jennifer Schuessler is an editor at The New York Times Book Review. (March 2011)

Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at Warwick University, England. His latest book is How Much Is Enough?: Money and the Good Life with Edward Skidelsky. He is the author of a three-volume biography of John Maynard Keynes.
 (April 2014)

Rory Stewart is Chairman of the Defence Committee of the House of Commons and the author of The Places in Between, among other books. He was previously the Ryan Professor of ­Human Rights at the Harvard Kennedy School.


Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast and the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas. (November 2017)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life.

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festchrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. (April 2017)