Contents


Eastwood’s War

Flags of Our Fathers a film directed by Clint Eastwood

Letters from Iwo Jima a film directed by Clint Eastwood

Treasures of Vanity

Pages from the Goncourt Journals by Edmond and Jules de Goncourt, edited, translated from the French, and with an introduction by Robert Baldick, and with a foreword by Geoff Dyer

What Is a Tree?

The Tree: A Natural History of What Trees Are, How They Live, and Why They Matter by Colin Tudge

The Plant-Book: A Portable Dictionary of the Vascular Plants, Second Edition by D.J. Mabberley

Is the UN Doomed?

The UN Exposed: How The United Nations Sabotages America’s Security and Fails the World by Eric Shawn

The Parliament of Man: The Past, Present, and Future of the United Nations by Paul Kennedy

The Best Intentions: Kofi Annan and the UN in the Era of American World Power by James Traub

Contributors

Kofi Annan was until recently the Secretary-General of the United Nations. (February 2007)

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author, most recently, of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.

 
(October 2014)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His book Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.

Michael Chabon is the author of several books, including The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier and Klay, The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son and most recently, Telegraph Avenue.

J. M. Coetzee’s novel The Childhood of Jesus was published in March 2013. He is Professor of Literature at the University of Adelaide and in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Helen Epstein is a writer specializing in public health and an adjunct professor at Bard College. She has advised numerous organizations, including the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, Human Rights Watch, and UNICEF. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa and has contributed articles to many publications, including The New York Review of Books and The New York Times Magazine.

Tim Flannery is a founding member of the Climate Council and 
former Chief Commissioner of the Australian Climate Commission. His most recent book is Among the Islands: Adventures in the Pacific. (August 2014)

Sue Halpern, a regular contributor to The New York Review on the subject of technology, is scholar-in-residence at Middlebury. Her most recent book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home.
 (November 2014)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Julia Kim is a physician and researcher based at the School of Public Health, University of the Witwatersrand (South Africa) and the Health Policy Unit, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (UK). She has been living and working in rural South Africa for the past nine years. (February 2007)

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and ­Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Princeton. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008.
 (October 2014)

Joseph Lelyveld is a former correspondent and Editor of The New York Times. His latest book is Great Soul: Mahatma Gandhi and His Struggle with India. (September 2014)

John Leonard writes on books every month for Harper’s and on television every week for New York magazine. (June 2007)

Janet Malcolm was born in Prague. She was educated at the High School of Music and Art, in New York, and at the University of Michigan. Along with In the Freud Archives, her books include Diana and Nikon: Essays on Photography, Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession, The Journalist and the Murderer, The Purloined Clinic: Selected Writings, The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, The Crime of Sheila McGough, and Reading Chekhov: A Critical Journey. She wrote about the trial of Mazoltuv Borukhova, the mother of Michelle, in her book Iphigenia in Forest Hills, just out in paperback. Her collection Forty-One False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers will be published in the spring of 2013.


She lives in New York.

William Pfaff’s latest book is The Irony of Manifest Destiny: The Tragedy of America’s Foreign Policy.
 (June 2013)

Graham Robb is the author of biographies of Balzac, Hugo, and Rimbaud. His latest book is The Discovery of Middle Earth: Mapping the Lost World of the Celts.
 (December 2013)

Christopher de Hamel is Donnelley Fellow Librarian of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. He was for many years responsible for sales of medieval illuminated manuscripts at Sotheby’s. He is the author of many books on medieval manuscripts and the history of book collecting. (February 2007)