Contents


Reconstructing Ronald Reagan

Ronald Reagan: Fate, Freedom, and the Making of History by John Patrick Diggins

Reagan: A Life in Letters edited by Kiron K. Skinner, Annelise Anderson, and Martin Anderson, with a foreword by George P. Shultz

Transforming America: Politics and Culture During the Reagan Years by Robert M. Collins

The Reagan Imprint: Ideas in American Foreign Policy from the Collapse of Communism to the War on Terror by John Arquilla

How Not to Deal with North Korea

A Moment of Crisis: Jimmy Carter, the Power of a Peacemaker, and North Korea’s Nuclear Ambitions by Marion V. Creekmore Jr.

Nuclear Showdown: North Korea Takes On the World by Gordon G. Chang

Rogue Regime: Kim Jong Il and the Looming Threat of North Korea by Jasper Becker

Did the Revolution Have to Fail?

Revolution in Hungary: The 1956 Budapest Uprising by Erich Lessing, with texts by George Konrad, François Fejtö, Erich Lessing, and Nicolas Bauquet

Twelve Days: The Story of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution by Victor Sebestyen

Failed Illusions: Moscow, Washington, Budapest, and the 1956 Hungarian Revolt by Charles Gati

The Hungarian Revolution of 1956: Myths and Realities by László Eörsi, translated from the Hungarian by Mario D. Fenyo

A Good Comrade: János Kádár, Communism and Hungary by Roger Gough

Contributors

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.

John Banville was born in Wexford, Ireland in 1945. He is the author of many novels, including The Book of Evidence, The Untouchable, Eclipse, The Sea (winner of the Man Booker Prize), and Ancient Light. As Benjamin Black he has written six crime novels, including Vengeance.

Richard Bernstein was Time‘s bureau chief in China and a foreign correspondent for The New York Times. His new book, China 1945: Mao’s Revolution and America’s Fateful Choice, will be ­published this fall.
 (April 2014)

Ian Buruma is currently Paul R. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard College. His previous books include Year Zero: A History of 1945, Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance, Taming the Gods: Religion and Democracy on Three Continents, and Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of its Enemies. He writes frequently for The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Magazine, The New Yorker, and the Financial Times. In Spring 2015, NYRB will reissue his book The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Japan and Germany.

Christian Caryl is a Senior Fellow at the Legatum Institute and the editor of Foreign Policy’s Democracy Lab website. His latest book is Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the 21st Century.

Clare Cavanagh is a scholar, translator, and critic. She received the National Book Critics’ Circle Award in criticism for her most recent book, Lyric Poetry and Modern Politics: Russia, Poland, and the West (2010). (January 2014)

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Melvin Konner is Samuel Candler Dobbs Professor of Anthropology at Emory. His most recent book, The Evolution of Childhood: Relationships, Emotion, Mind, was published in paperback in November. (December 2011)

Daniel Mendelsohn is the author of a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; the international best seller The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a translation of the works of C. P. Cavafy; and a previous collection of essays, How Beautiful It Is and How Easily It Can Be Broken. He teaches at Bard College.

Tim Parks, a novelist, essayist, and translator, is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He has recently published the novel Sex Is Forbidden and the travel book Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo.


Jennifer Schuessler is an editor at The New York Times Book Review. (March 2011)

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He has published some twenty collections of poetry, six books of essays, a memoir, and numerous translations. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Simic’s recent works include Voice at 3 a.m., a selection of later and new poems; Master of Disguises, new poems; and Confessions of a Poet Laureate, a collection of short essays that was published by New York Review Books as an e-book original. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. His New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 was published in March 2013.

Eliot Weinberger’s most recent book is the essay collection Oranges & Peanuts for Sale.

Adam Zagajewski’s books include Eternal Enemies 
and Without End: New and Selected Poems. The poems in this issue are from his new book, Unseen Hand, published in May by Farrar, Straus and Giroux. (May 2011)

Christopher de Bellaigue was born in London in 1971 and has worked as a journalist in the Middle East and South Asia since 1994. His first book, In the Rose Garden of the Martyrs: A Memoir of Iran, was shortlisted for the Royal Society of Literature’s Ondaatje Prize. His latest book is Patriot of Persia: Muhammad Mossadegh and a Tragic Anglo-American Coup. He lives in Tehran with his wife and two children.