Contents


The Purest of Styles

Vincent van Gogh—Painted with Words: The Letters to Émile Bernard Catalog of the exhibition by Leo Jansen, Hans Luijten, and Nienke Bakker

How They Won

Partners in Command: George Marshall and Dwight Eisenhower in War and Peace by Mark Perry

15 Stars: Eisenhower, MacArthur, Marshall: Three Generals Who Savedthe American Century by Stanley Weintraub

The Most Magnificent Muslims

Goa and the Great Mughal edited by Jorge Flores and Nuno Vassallo e Silva

Domesticity and Power in the Early Mughal World by Ruby Lal

The Complete Taj Mahal and the Riverfront Gardens of Agra by Ebba Koch, with drawings byRichard André Barraud

In Sicilian Shadows

Behind Closed Doors: Her Father’s House and Other Stories of Sicily by Maria Messina, translated from the Italian by Elise Magistro

Contributors

Al Alvarez is the author of Risky Business, a selection of essays, many of which first appeared in The New York Review of Books.

Richard Bernstein was Time’s bureau chief in China and a foreign correspondent for The New York Times. His most recent book is China 1945: Mao’s Revolution and America’s Fateful Choice.

 (November 2014)

Harold Bloom’s most recent books are The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life and The Shadow of a Great Rock: A Literary Appreciation of the King James Bible. He teaches at Yale and is at work on a play, To You Whoever You are: A Pageant Celebrating Walt Whitman.
 (February 2012)

William Dalrymple’s books include The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty, Delhi 1857 and Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan, 1839–42. He is codirector of the Jaipur Literature Festival.
 (October 2014)

Orlando Figes is Professor of History at Birkbeck College, University of London. He is the author, among other books, of The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin’s Russia, A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution: 1891–1924, and Natasha’s Dance: A Cultural History of Russia, and The Crimean War: A History. His latest book is Just Send Me Word: A True Story of Love and Survival in the Gulag and his next book, Revolutionary Russia, 1891–1991, will be published in April 2014.

Max Hastings has been the editor of The Daily Telegraph and The Evening Standard. His most recent book, Inferno: The World at War, 1939–1945, was published in November.
 (February 2012)

Edmund Keeley is Charles Barnwell Straut Professor of English Emeritus at Princeton. His latest books are Borderlines: A Memoir and the novel Some Wine for Remembrance. (November 2007)

Sergei Kovalev, a biologist and former political prisoner, is a leading candidate on the Yabloko Party list for the December election to the Russian State Duma. He is President of the Institute for Human Rights and Chairman of the Andrei Sakharov Foundation in Moscow. (November 2007)

Peter Matthiessen won the 2008 National Book Award for his novel Shadow Country. His recent books include End of the Earth: Voyage to Antarctica and The Birds of Heaven: Travels with Cranes. (November 2009)

Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College. His essay in the September 25, 2014 issue will appear as the introduction to a new translation of The Bacchae by Robin Robertson, to be published in September by Ecco.

Aryeh Neier is President Emeritus of the Open Society Foundations. He was for twelve years the Executive Director of ­Human Rights Watch.


Robert O. Paxton is Mellon Professor of Social Sciences Emeritus at Columbia and a former president of the Linnaean ­Society of New York. His books include Vichy France: Old Guard and New Order, 1940–1944 and, with Michael R. Marrus, Vichy France and the Jews.


Francine Prose is a Distinguished Visiting Writer 
at Bard. Her new novel is Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932.

Robin Robertson is from the northeast coast of Scotland. His fifth collection of poetry will be published next year. (June 2012)

Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published this summer. He is a Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Stanford this year.

Cathleen Schine is the author of several novels, including Rameau’s Niece, The Love Letter, She is Me, The New Yorkers, and The Three Weissmanns of Westport. Her latest novel, Fin & Lady, was published in July 2013. She is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books.

Robert M. Solow, Institute Professor Emeritus of Economics at MIT, won the 1987 Nobel Prize in economics. His most recent book is Work and Welfare. (May 2009)

Robert Stone was born in Brooklyn in 1937. He is the author of seven novels: A Hall of Mirrors, the National Book Award–winning Dog Soldiers, A Flag for Sunrise, Children of Light, Outerbridge Reach, Damascus Gate, and Bay of Souls. He has also written short stories, essays, and screenplays, and published a short story collection, Bear and His Daughter, which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. He lives in New York City and in Key West, Florida.

John Terborgh, who has worked in the Peruvian Amazon since 1973, is Research Professor in the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke and Director of its Center for Tropical Conservation. His latest book, co-edited with James A. Estes, is Trophic Cascades: Predators, Prey, and the Changing Dynamics of Nature.
 (April 2012)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast and Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas.

 (December 2014)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit: Angstrom, he two of which, Rabbit is Richand Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.