Contents


How Historic a Victory?

Unequal Democracy: The Political Economy of the New Gilded Age by Larry M. Bartels

Red, Blue, and Purple America: The Future of Election Demographics edited by Ruy Teixeira

Cruising with Caesar

Caesar: A Life in Western Culture by Maria Wyke.

Julius Caesar by Philip Freeman

Caesar’s Calendar: Ancient Time and the Beginnings of History by Denis Feeney

The War We Don’t Want to See

War Surgery in Afghanistan and Iraq: A Series of Cases, 2003–2007 edited by Shawn Christian Nessen, Dave Edmond Lounsbury, and Stephen P. Hetz, with a foreword by Bob Woodruff

Generation Kill a miniseries written and produced by David Simon and Ed Burns, based on the book by Evan Wright

Baghdad ER a film directed by Jon Alpert and Matthew O'Neill

Section 60: Arlington National Cemetery a film directed by Jon Alpert and Matthew O'Neill

The Forever War by Dexter Filkins

If Shakespeare Had Been Able to Google…’

Alphabet Juice: The Energies, Gists, and Spirits of Letters, Words, and Combinations Thereof; Their Roots, Bones, Innards, Piths, Pips, and Secret Parts, Tinctures, Tonics, and Essences; With Examples of Their Usage Foul and Savory by Roy Blount Jr.

Reading the OED: One Man, One Year, 21,730 Pages by Ammon Shea

The First English Dictionary, 1604 by Robert Cawdrey, with an introduction by John Simpson

The Unknown Women of India

Women of the Raj: The Mothers, Wives, and Daughters of the British Empire in India by Margaret MacMillan

Sex and the Family in Colonial India: The Making of Empire by Durba Ghosh

Do Schools Have to Be Boring?

School by Catherine Burke and Ian Grosvenor

The Open Classroom: A Practical Guide to a New Way of Teaching by Herbert R. Kohl

Social Design: Creating Buildings with People in Mind by Robert Sommer

Big Box Reuse by Julia Christensen

Small Wonder: The Little Red Schoolhouse in History and Memory by Jonathan Zimmerman

Children’s Spaces edited by Mark Dudek

Nanny State: How Food Fascists, Teetotaling Do-Gooders, Priggish Moralists, and Other Boneheaded Bureaucrats Are Turning America into a Nation of Children by David Harsanyi

Contributors

Mary Beard is Professor of Classics at the University of Cambridge. Her Sather Lectures at the University of California, Berkeley, were published in June as Laughter in Ancient Rome: On Joking, Tickling, and Cracking Up.
 (October 2014)

Christian Caryl is a Senior Fellow at the Legatum Institute and the editor of Foreign Policy’s Democracy Lab website. His latest book is Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the 21st Century.

Joan Didion is the author of The Year of Magical Thinking and We Tell Ourselves Stories in Order to Live: Collected Nonfiction.

Elizabeth Drew is a regular contributor to The New York Review. Her most recent book, Washington Journal: Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall, was published in May.

 (September 2014)

Deborah Eisenberg is the author of four collections of short stories and a play, Pastorale.
 She is the winner of the 2000 Rea Award for the Short Story, a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Lannan Foundation Fellowship, and five O. Henry Awards. The Collected Stories of Deborah Eisenberg won the 2011 PEN/Faulkner Award. She lives in New York City.

James Gleick’s latest book is The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood. He is working on a history of time travel.

Barry Goldensohn is the author of five collections of poems: St. Venus Eve, Uncarving the Block, The Marrano, Dance Music, and, with his wife, Lorrie, East Long Pond. (December 2008)

Alma Guillermoprieto often writes on Latin America in these pages. She lives in Mexico City. (November 2012)

Sue Halpern, a regular contributor to The New York Review on the subject of technology, is scholar-in-residence at Middlebury. Her most recent book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home.
 (November 2014)

Ian Jack was the editor of The Independent on Sunday and of Granta. He is the author of The Country Formerly Known as Great Britain and he writes regularly for The Guardian.

Maya Jasanoff is Professor of History at Harvard. She is the author of Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World and Edge of Empire: Lives, Culture, and Conquest in the East 1750–1850. (April 2014)

Sarah Kerr, a longtime contributor to The New York Review, lives near Washington, D.C. (November 2014)

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and ­Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Princeton. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008.
 (October 2014)

Alison Lurie is Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of two collections of essays on children’s literature, Don’t Tell the Grownups and Boys and Girls Forever, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent novel is Truth and Consequences.


Michael Massing, a contributing editor of the Columbia Journalism Review, writes frequently on the press and foreign affairs.

Orhan Pamuk is the author, most recently, of The Museum of Innocence. He was awarded the 2006 Nobel Prize in Literature.

Darryl Pinckney, a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. He has worked for Robert Wilson on various theatrical projects, most recently an adaptation of Daniil Kharms’s The Old Woman.

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

Ingrid D. Rowland is a professor, based in Rome, at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she is the author of The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome and The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery. She has also published a translation of Vitruvius’ Ten Books of Architecture and a history of Villa Taverna, the US ambassador’s residence in Rome. Her new book is From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town.


Meyer Schapiro, who died in 1996, taught for many years at Columbia. He was one of the most influential art historians of the last century and a contributor to The New York Review. Meyer Schapiro Abroad: Letters to Lillian and Travel Notebooks, in which the letters in this issue appear, will be published in January by Getty. (December 2008)

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He has published some twenty collections of poetry, six books of essays, a memoir, and numerous translations. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Simic’s recent works include Voice at 3 a.m., a selection of later and new poems; Master of Disguises, new poems; and Confessions of a Poet Laureate, a collection of short essays that was published by New York Review Books as an e-book original. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. His New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 was published in March 2013. His article in this issue, August 14, 2014, was delivered as a talk at the Manggha Museum of ­Japanese Art and Technology in Kraków earlier this year, when he was presented with the Zbigniew Herbert International Literary Award.


Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast, Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, and author of the e-book Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Beatles and America, Then and Now.
 (June 2014)

Garry Wills holds the Alonzo L. McDonald Family Chair on the Life and Teachings of Jesus and Their Impact on Culture at Emory.