Contents


Who Is John McCain?

Free Ride: John McCain and the Media by David Brock and Paul Waldman

The Real McCain: Why Conservatives Don’t Trust Him—and Why Independents Shouldn’t by Cliff Schecter

McCain: The Myth of a Maverick by Matt Welch

Jihadi Suicide Bombers: The New Wave

Inside the Jihad: My Life with Al Qaeda, A Spy’s Story by Omar Nasiri

Architect of Global Jihad: The Life of al-Qaida Strategist Abu Mus’ab al-Suri by Brynjar Lia

Jihad in Islamic History: Doctrines and Practice by Michael Bonner

The Taliban and the Crisis of Afghanistan edited by Robert D. Crews and Amin Tarzi

Koran, Kalashnikov, and Laptop: The Neo-Taliban Insurgency in Afghanistan by Antonio Giustozzi

The Five Front War: The Better Way to Fight Global Jihad by Daniel Byman

Winning the Right War: The Path to Security for America and the World by Philip H. Gordon

The Truth Force at the Met

Satyagraha an opera in three acts by Philip Glass, directed by Phelim McDermott, with stage design by Julian Crouch

Satyagraha: M. K. Gandhi in South Africa, 1893-1914 by Constance Dejong and Philip Glass

Satyagraha an opera by Philip Glass, performed by Douglas Perry, Claudia Cummings, Rhonda Liss, Robert McFarland, Scott Reeve, Sheryl Woods, and the New York City Opera and Chorus, conducted by Christopher Keene

Flying High with Eero Saarinen

Eero Saarinen: Shaping the Future an exhibition at the National Building Museum, Washington, D.C.,May 3–August 23, 2008; the Minneapolis Institute of Art and Walker Art Center, September 14, 2008–January 4, 2009; the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Washington University, St. Louis, Missou

Eero Saarinen: Buildings from the Balthazar Korab Archive edited by David G. De Long and C. Ford Peatross

The Gateway Arch: A Reflection of America a film directed by Scott Huegerich and Bob Miano, narrated by Kevin Kline

The Brits Do It Better

The Cost of Counterterrorism: Power, Politics, and Liberty by Laura K. Donohue

Executive Measures, Terrorism and National Security: Have the Rules of the Game Changed? by David Bonner

Contributors

John Cassidy is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author, most recently, of How Markets Fail: The Logic of Economic Calamities.
 (May 2014)

David Cole is the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law Center. He is the author of several books, including The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009), Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror (with Jules Lobel, 2007) and Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism (2003).

Robert Darnton is Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and University Librarian at Harvard. 
His forthcoming book is Censors at Work: How States Shaped Literature.

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

Joseph Frank is Professor Emeritus of Slavic and Comparative Literature at Stanford. He is the author of Dostoyevsky: The Mantle of the Prophet, 1871–1881. (June 2008)

Kent Greenawalt is a University Professor at Columbia Law School. His Religion and the Constitution, Volume 2: Establishment and Fairness will be published in June. (May 2008)

Jasper Griffin is Emeritus Professor of Classical Literature and a Fellow of Balliol College, Oxford. His books include Homer on Life and Death.

Stephen Kinzer, a former New York Times bureau chief in Nica­ragua, is a visiting fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown. His new book is The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War. (December 2013)

Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College.

Edward Mendelson is the Lionel Trilling Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University and the literary executor of the estate of W.H. Auden. He is the author of Early Auden, Later Auden, and The Things That Matter, a volume of essays on Mary Shelley, Emily and Charlotte Brönte, George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf. His Lives of the New York Intellectuals: A Group Portrait will be published in early 2015.

W.S. Merwin was born in New York City in 1927 and grew up in Union City, New Jersey, and in Scranton, Pennsylvania. From 1949 to 1951 he worked as a tutor in France, Portugal, and Majorca. He has since lived in many parts of the world, most recently on Maui in the Hawaiian Islands. He is the author of many books of poems, prose, and translations and has received both the Pulitzer and the Bollingen Prizes for poetry, among numerous other awards. His new poetry collection is The Moon Before Morning.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Martha Nussbaum is Ernst Freund Distinguished Service Professor of Law and Ethics at the University of Chicago, with appointments in the Philosophy Department, the Law School, and the Divinity School. Her most recent book is Women and Human Development: The Capabilities Approach. (January 2001)

Joyce Carol Oates is currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Writing Program at NYU. Her most recent novel is Carthage.

Ahmed Rashid is the author of Pakistan on the Brink: The Future of America, Pakistan, and Afghanistan and several books on Afghanistan and Central Asia. (June 2014)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast, Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas, and author of the e-book Yeah! Yeah! Yeah!: The Beatles and America, Then and Now.
 (June 2014)

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. Her most recent book is Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries.
 (June 2014)