Contents


Daring and Disturbing

Louise Bourgeois an exhibition at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York City, June 27–September 28, 2008;the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, October 26, 2008– January 25, 2009;and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C.,February 26–May 17

Destruction of the Father/Reconstruction of the Father: Writings and Interviews, 1923–1997 by Louise Bourgeois, edited by Marie-Laure Bernadac and Hans-Ulrich Obrist

Louise Bourgeois: Aller-Retour edited by Gerald Matt and Peter Weiermair

They Soared Above the Din

Lincoln and Douglas: The Debates That Defined America by Allen C. Guelzo

The Lincoln-Douglas Debates edited by Rodney O. Davis andDouglas L. Wilson

In Rough Country

Fine Just the Way It Is: Wyoming Stories 3 by Annie Proulx

Close Range: Wyoming Stories by Annie Proulx

Bad Dirt: Wyoming Stories 2 by Annie Proulx

What Happened to the American Empire?

On Empire: America, War, and Global Supremacy by Eric Hobsbawm

Day of Empire: How Hyperpowers Rise to Global Dominance—and Why They Fall by Amy Chua

The Second World: Empires and Influence in the New Global Order by Parag Khanna

The Post-American World by Fareed Zakaria

The Return of History and the End of Dreams by Robert Kagan

A New, Political Saint Paul?

What Paul Meant by Garry Wills

The Political Theology of Paul by Jacob Taubes, translated from the German by Dana Hollander

The Time That Remains: A Commentary on the Letter to the Romans by Giorgio Agamben, translated from the Italian by Patricia Dailey

Saint Paul: The Foundation of Universalism by Alain Badiou, translated from the French by Ray Brassier

Being and Event by Alain Badiou, translated from the French by Oliver Feltham

The Century by Alain Badiou, translated from the French with commentary and notes by Alberto Toscano

Polemics by Alain Badiou, translated from the French with an introductionby Steve Corcoran

Une querelle avec Alain Badiou, philosophe by Éric Marty

On Belief by Slavoj Zizek

The Egyptian Connection

The Lindisfarne Gospels: Society, Spirituality and the Scribe by Michelle P. Brown

Ritual and the Rood: Liturgical Images and the Old English Poems of the Dream of the Rood Tradition by Éamonn Ó Carragáin

Word and Image: An Introduction to Early Medieval Art by William J. Diebold

Contributors

Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and Slate. Her most recent book is Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944–1956.
 (June 2013)

Julian Bell is a painter and writer living in Lewes, England. His Van Gogh: A Power Seething will be published early next year.
 (June 2014)

John Cassidy is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author, most recently, of How Markets Fail: The Logic of Economic Calamities.
 (May 2014)

William Dalrymple’s books include The Last Mughal: The Fall of a Dynasty, Delhi 1857 and Return of a King: The Battle for Afghanistan, 1839–42. He is codirector of the Jaipur Literature Festival.
 (March 2014)

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

George Friedman is Founder and CEO of Stratfor, a private intelligence company publishing geopolitical and security analysis at www.stratfor.com. He is author of America’s Secret War. His new book, The Next Hundred Years, will be published in January 2009. (September 2008)

Peter W. Galbraith, a former US Ambassador to Croatia, is Senior Diplomatic Fellow at the Center for Arms Control and a principal at the Windham Resources Group, which has worked in Iraq. His new book, Unintended Consequences: How War in Iraq Strengthened Americaå?s Enemies, has just been released. (October 2008)

Joshua Hammer is a former Newsweek bureau chief and correspondent-at-large in Africa and the Middle East. His new book, Taking Timbuktu, will be published next year. His report in this issue was supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.
 (May 2014)

Max Hastings has been the editor of The Daily Telegraph and The Evening Standard. His most recent book, Inferno: The World at War, 1939–1945, was published in November.
 (February 2012)

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. He is the author of several books, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, and The Global Soul. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and other publications and his most recent book is The Man Within My Head.

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. Her books include Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce. Her new book, Flyover Lives, was published in January 2014.

Adam Kirsch’s second collection of poems is Invasions. His new book of essays, Rocket and Lightship, will be published this fall. (September 2014)

Mark Lilla is Professor of the Humanities at Columbia 
and author of The Stillborn God: Politics, Religion, and the Modern West.



Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

John F. Murray is the author of Intensive Care: A Doctorå?s Journal. (October 2008)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His most recent book is Stolen Glimpses, Captive ­Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.


James Oakes’s most recent book is The Radical and the Republican: Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Triumph of Antislavery Politics. (April 2009)

Joyce Carol Oates is currently Visiting Professor in the Graduate Writing Program at NYU. Her most recent novel is Carthage.

Alan Ryan’s collected essays The Making of Modern Liberalism and his two-volume work On Politics: A History of Political Thought were published last year.

Sanford Schwartz’s reviews have been collected in The Art Presence and Artists and Writers. (August 2014)

Colm Tóibín is the Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia. His most recent book is The Testament of Mary.


John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit: Angstrom, he two of which, Rabbit is Richand Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.