Contents


Such, Such Was Eric Blair

Facing Unpleasant Facts: Narrative Essays by George Orwell, compiled and with an introduction by George Packer

All Art Is Propaganda: Critical Essays by George Orwell, compiled by George Packer, with an introduction by Keith Gessen

Why I Write by George Orwell

Connoisseurs of Cruelty

Like Eating a Stone: Surviving the Past in Bosnia by Wojciech Tochman, translated from the Polishby Antonia Lloyd-Jone

Madame Prosecutor: Confrontations with Humanity’s Worst Criminals and the Culture of Impunity by Carla Del Ponte with Chuck Sudetic

Kosovo: What Everyone Needs to Know by Tim Judah

An Eye on the Tremors

Let’s See: Writings on Art from The New Yorker by Peter Schjeldahl

The 7 Days Art Columns, 1988–1990 by Peter Schjeldahl

Columns and Catalogues by Peter Schjeldahl

The Hydrogen Jukebox: Selected Writings of Peter Schjeldahl, 1978–1990 edited by Malin Wilson, with an introduction by Robert Storr

Contributors

Hilton Als is a staff writer for The New Yorker and the co­author, most recently, of Alice Neel: Uptown. He received the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Criticism.
 (June 2017)

Julian Barnes’s most recent books are Keeping an Eye Open: Essays on Art and The Noise of Time, a novel.
 (April 2017)

Anita Desai is the author, most recently, of The Artist of Disappearance, a collection of three novellas. (October 2015)

Fred Halliday is ICREA Research Professor at the Barcelona Institute for International Studies. His books Language and Politics in the Middle East and Britain’s First Muslims will be published in the uk later this year.

(March 2009)

Robert Pogue Harrison teaches literature at Stanford. His books include Forests: The Shadow of Civilization and Gardens: An Essay on the Human Condition. (August 2017)

William Luers is Director of The Iran Project and Adjunct Professor at SIPA, Columbia University. He was US Ambassador to Venezuela and Czechoslovakia. (August 2013)

Norman Mailer (1923-2007) was born in Long Branch, New Jersey, and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. In 1955 he co-founded The Village Voice. He is the author of more than thirty books, including The Naked and the Dead; The Armies of the Night, for which he won a National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize; The Executioner’s Song, for which he won his second Pulitzer Prize; Harlot’s Ghost; Oswald’s Tale; The Gospel According to the Son; and The Castle in the Forest.

Wyatt Mason is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and a Writer in Residence at Bard, where he is Senior Fellow of the Hannah Arendt Center. 

(September 2017)

Ian McEwan is the author most recently of On Chesil Beach. (March 2009)

Richard Parker is Lecturer in Public Policy and Senior Fellow of the Shorenstein Center at Harvard. His most recent book is John Kenneth Galbraith: His Life, His Politics, His Economics. (March 2009)

Thomas R. Pickering was formerly US Under Secretary of State and Ambassador to Russia, Israel, India, Jordan, El Salvador, Nigeria, and the UN. (August 2013)

Charles Rosen was a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

James Salter, who died on June 19, was a novelist and short-story writer whose books included A Sport and a Pastime, Light Years, Dusk and Other ­Stories, and, most recently, All That Is
. (August 2015)

Sanford Schwartz is the author of Christen Købke and William Nicholson. (October 2017)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His latest book is Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry. (November 2017)

Jim Walsh is on the faculty of the MIT Security Studies Program and Political Science Department. He was previously Executive Director of the Managing the Atom Project at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government. (August 2013)

Garry Wills is the subject of a Festchrift published by Northwestern’s Garret-Evangelical Theological Seminary, Nation and World, Church and God: The Legacy of Garry Wills. (April 2017)