Contents


American Pastoral

Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits by Linda Gordon

Daring to Look: Dorothea Lange’s Photographs and Reports from the Field by Anne Whiston Spirn

Heroes from Hungary

Double Exile: Migrations of Jewish-Hungarian Professionals Through Germany to the United States, 1919–1945 by Tibor Frank

Enemies of the People: My Family’s Journey to America by Kati Marton

Napoleon’s Eye

Dominique-Vivant Denon: L’oeil de Napoléon an exhibition at the Louvre, Paris, October 20, 1999–January 17, 2000

No Tomorrow by Vivant Denon, translated from the French by Lydia Davis, and with an introduction by Peter Brooks

Inventing the Louvre: Art, Politics, and the Origins of the Modern Museum in Eighteenth-Century Paris by Andrew McClellan

Breaking a Conspiracy of Silence

Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

Creating a World Without Poverty: Social Business and the Future of Capitalism by Muhammad Yunus, with Karl Weber

Can Our Shameful Prisons Be Reformed?

Race, Incarceration, and American Values by Glenn C. Loury, with Pamela S. Karlan, Tommie Shelby, and Loïc Wacquant

Let’s Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice by Paul Butler

Releasing Prisoners, Redeeming Communities: Reentry, Race, and Politics by Anthony C. Thompson

A Great Jump to Disaster?

The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning by James Lovelock

James Lovelock: In Search of Gaia by John Gribbin and Mary Gribbin

The Medea Hypothesis: Is Life on Earth Ultimately Self-Destructive? by Peter Ward

Contributors

Bernard Bailyn is Adams University Professor Emeritus at ­Harvard. His most recent books are The Barbarous Years: The Peopling of British North America—The Conflict of Civilizations, 1600­–1675 and Sometimes an Art: Nine Essays on History. 
(August 2015)

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.
 (November 2016)

Richard Bernstein was Time’s Bureau Chief in China and a foreign correspondent for The New York Times. His most recent book is China 1945: Mao’s Revolution and America’s Fateful Choice. (September 2017)

Peter Brooks, Sterling Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature at Yale, teaches at Princeton. His book Flaubert in the Ruins of Paris was published in April. (July 2017)

Dan Chiasson’s fourth collection of poetry is Bicentennial. He teaches at Wellesley. (June 2017)

David Cole is the National Legal Director of the ACLU and the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. The paperback edition of his book Engines of Liberty: How Citizen Movements Succeed has just been published. (December 2017)

Andrew Delbanco is Alexander Hamilton Professor of American Studies at Columbia.
 (November 2016)

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Martin Filler is the 2017 recipient of the Stephen A. Kliment ­Oculus Award, given by the New York Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, for his architecture criticism, which has appeared in these pages since 1985.
 (August 2017)

Tim Flannery is the author of Chasing Kangaroos: A Continent, a Scientist, and a Search for the World’s Most Extraordinary Creature and, most recently, Atmosphere of Hope: Searching for Solutions to the Climate 
Crisis.
 (December 2017)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review and a Scholar-in-Residence at Middlebury. Her latest book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home. (July 2017)

Joost Hiltermann is the Middle East & North Africa Program Director of the International Crisis Group and the author of A Poisonous Affair: America, Iraq, and the Gassing of Halabja. (December 2017)

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. His books include The Art of Stillness and The Man Within My Head.
 (June 2017)

Michael Kimmelman is a longtime critic for The New York Times. A version of his essay in this issue will appear in the collection City Squares: Eighteen Writers on the Spirit and Significance of Squares Around the World, edited by Catie Marron and published in April by Harper.
 (April 2016)

David Lodge is a novelist and critic and Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, England. His novels include Changing Places, Small World, Nice Work, and A Man of Parts. His most recent works of criticism are Consciousness and the Novel and The Year of Henry James.

Peter Matthiessen won the 2008 National Book Award for his novel Shadow Country. His recent books include End of the Earth: Voyage to Antarctica and The Birds of Heaven: Travels with Cranes. (November 2009)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

David Shulman is Professor Emeritus at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an activist in Ta’ayush, Arab–Jewish Partnership. He was awarded the Israel Prize for Religious Studies in 2016. (December 2017)

Derek Walcott is a poet, playwright, essayist, and visual artist. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992. (November 2016)