Up in the Park

Designing the High Line: Gansevoort Street to 30th Street edited by Friends of the High Line, with forewords by James Corner and Ricardo Scofidio

Godfather of the Modern?

Cézanne and Beyond an exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, February 26–May 17, 2009

Cézanne und die Moderne an exhibition at the Fondation Beyeler, Riehen bei Basel, Switzerland, October 10, 1999–January 9, 2000

Cézanne and the Dawn of Modern Art an exhibition at the Museum Folkwang, Essen, Germany, September 18, 2004–January 16, 2005

The News About the Internet

Bloggers on the Bus: How the Internet Changed Politics and the Press by Eric Boehlert

And Then There’s This: How Stories Live and Die in Viral Culture by Bill Wasik

Rob Browne at Daily Kos:

Juan Cole, Informed Comment:

Brad DeLong, Grasping Reality with Both Hands:

Jeffrey Goldberg:

Michael Goldfarb:

Glenn Greenwald:

Ryan Grim at The Huffington Post:

Joanne Jacobs:

Ron Kampeas, CapitalJ:

Mickey Kaus, kausfiles:

Mark Kleiman, The Reality-Based Community:

Ezra Klein at The Washington Post:

Kevin Pho, KevinMD:

M.J. Rosenberg:

Yves Smith:

Andrew Sullivan, The Daily Dish:

Tanta at CalculatedRISK:

Philip Weiss, Mondoweiss:

Marcy Wheeler, emptywheel at FireDogLake:

Matthew Yglesias:


Talking Points Memo:

Why Are Bankers Still Being Treated As Beltway Royalty?” by Arianna Huffington

The State of the News Media, 2009: An Annual Report on American Journalism” by the Pew Research Center's Project for Excellence in Journalism

Newspapers and Thinking the Unthinkable” by Clay Shirky

Ross Douthat at The New York Times:

New York: The Prophet

Wrestling with Moses: How Jane Jacobs Took on New York’s Master Builder and Transformed the American City by Anthony Flint

Genius of Common Sense: Jane Jacobs and the Story of The Death and Life of Great American Cities by Glenna Lang and Marjory Wunsch

A Question of Coexistence

The Arts of Intimacy: Christians, Jews, and Muslims in the Making of Castilian Culture by Jerrilynn D. Dodds

All Can Be Saved: Religious Tolerance and Salvation in the Iberian Atlantic World by Stuart B. Schwartz

Oblomov in Dublin

The Complete Novels: At Swim-Two-Birds, The Third Policeman, The Poor Mouth, The Hard Life, The Dalkey Archive by Flann O'Brien, with an introduction by Keith Donohue


Joan Acocella is a staff writer for The New Yorker. Her most recent book is Twenty-eight Artists and Two Saints.

Hilton Als is a staff writer for The New Yorker and the ­co­author, most recently, of Robert Gober: The Heart Is Not a ­Metaphor, which was published simultaneously with the exhibition of Gober’s work at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.

John Ashbery is the author of several books of poetry, including Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1975), which received the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the National Book Award. His first collection, Some Trees (1956), was selected by W. H. Auden for the Yale Younger Poets Series. He has also published art criticism, plays, and a novel. From 1990 until 2008 Ashbery was the Charles P. Stevenson, Jr. Professor of Languages and Literature at Bard College. Ashbery’s new collection of poems, Breezeway, will be ­published in May 2015.

Mary Beard is Professor of Classics at the University of Cambridge. Her Sather Lectures at the University of California, Berkeley, were published in June as Laughter in Ancient Rome: On Joking, Tickling, and Cracking Up.
 (October 2014)

Elaine Blair is a regular contributor to The New York Review. (June 2015)

J. M. Coetzee’s novel The Childhood of Jesus was published in March 2013. He is Professor of Literature at the University of Adelaide and in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

Roger Cohen is a columnist for The New York Times. His family memoir, The Girl from Human Street: Ghosts of Memory in a Jewish Family, will be published in January 2015.
 (December 2014)

Michael Dirda, a weekly book columnist for The Washington Post, received the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for criticism. He is the author of the memoir An Open Book and of four collections of essays: Readings, Bound to Please, Book by Book, and Classics for Pleasure. His most recent book, On Conan Doyle, received a 2012 Edgar Award for best critical/biographical work of the year.
 Dirda graduated with Highest Honors in English from Oberlin College and earned a Ph.D. in comparative literature (medieval studies and European romanticism) from Cornell University. He is a contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, the online Barnes & Noble Review, and several other periodicals, as well as a frequent lecturer and an occasional college teacher. His new book, ­Browsings: A Year of Reading, Collecting, and Living with Books, will be out next summer.

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied. Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), The Scientist as Rebel (2006, published by New York Review Books), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). New York Review Books will publish Dreams of Earth and Sky, a new collection of Dyson’s essays, in April 2015. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

J. H. Elliott is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern History at Oxford. His most recent book is History in the Making.

Jason Epstein, former Editorial Director at Random House, was a founder of The New York Review and of the Library of America. He is the author of Eating: A Memoir. (Dectember 2013)

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

Max Hastings is the author of many books on military history, including, most recently, Catastrophe 1914: Europe Goes to War. His new book, The Secret War, will be published next year.
 (October 2015)

Robert L. Herbert, after a long career at Yale, is now Andrew W. Mellon Professor Emeritus of Humanities at Mount Holyoke. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society, and has been named Officier dans l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres by the French Government. Among his books are Impressionism: Art, Leisure and Parisian Society, Nature’s Workshop: Renoir’s Writings on the Decorative Arts, and Seurat: Drawings and Paintings. His most recent book is Seurat and the Making of La Grande Jatte.

Adam Hochschild has written for The New Yorker, Harper’s Magazine, The New York Review of Books, and The Nation. His books include King Leopold’s Ghost and, most recently, To End All Wars. He teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California, Berkeley.

Michael Kimmelman is a longtime critic for 
The New York Times. (February 2015)

Avishai Margalit is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the winner of the 2012 Ernst Bloch Prize in philosophy.

Theodore R. Marmor is Professor Emeritus of Public Policy and Political Science at Yale. His most recent book is Fads, Fallacies and Foolishness in Medical Care Management and Policy. (August 2010)

Michael Massing, a former executive editor of the Columbia Journalism Review, frequently writes about the press.

Fintan O’Toole is Literary Editor of The Irish Times and Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His latest book is A History of Ireland in 100 Objects.
 (December 2015)

Jonathan Oberlander is Professor of Social Medicine and Health Policy and Management at the University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill. He is the author of The Political Life of Medicare.
 (August 2010)

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. The Lunatic, his new ­volume of poetry, and The Life of Images, a book of his selected prose, were published in April.

Timothy Snyder is the Housum Professor of History at Yale. 
His essay in the September 24, 2015 issue is drawn from his new book, Black Earth: The ­Holocaust as History and Warning, published in September 2015 by Tim Duggan Books, an imprint of Random House.

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)

Michael Walzer is Professor Emeritus in the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study and coeditor emeritus of Dissent. His new book is The Paradox of Liberation: Secular Revolutions and Religious Counterrevolutions.
 (March 2015)

Charles Wright’s most recent book is Bye-and-Bye: Selected Late Poems. (February 2012)