Contents


What You Can Learn from Reinhold Niebuhr

The Irony of American History by Reinhold Niebuhr, with an introduction by Andrew J. Bacevich

The Limits of Power: The End of American Exceptionalism by Andrew J. Bacevich

The Freedom Agenda: Why America Must Spread Democracy (Just Not the Way George Bush Did) by James Traub

The Death and Life of a Great Chinese City

The Last Days of Old Beijing: Life in the Vanishing Backstreets of a City Transformed by Michael Meyer

Out of Mao’s Shadow: The Struggle for the Soul of a New China by Philip P. Pan

Serve the People: A Stir-Fried Journey Through China by Jen Lin-Liu

Contributors

Richard Bernstein was Time‘s bureau chief in China and a foreign correspondent for The New York Times. His new book, China 1945: Mao’s Revolution and America’s Fateful Choice, will be ­published this fall.
 (April 2014)

Roger Cohen is a columnist for The New York Times and the International Herald Tribune. He is completing a family memoir, to be published next year. (June 2013)

Robert Darnton is Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and University Librarian at Harvard. 
His forthcoming book is Censors at Work: How States Shaped Literature.

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Elizabeth Drew is a regular contributor to The New York Review and the former Washington correspondent of The New Yorker and The Atlantic.

 (September 2013)

Stephen Greenblatt is the author of, among other books, Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare and The Swerve: How the World Became Modern (winner of the National Book Award, the James Russell Lowell Award, and the Pulitzer Prize). He is the John Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard.

J.D. McClatchy is an American poet and librettist. He is 
­Editor of The Yale Review. His most recent book is Plundered Hearts: New and Selected Poems.
 (April 2014)

Daniel Mendelsohn, a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author, most recently, of Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture. He teaches at Bard.


Edward Mendelson is the Lionel Trilling Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University and the literary executor of the estate of W.H. Auden. He is the author of *Early Auden*, *Later Auden*, and *The Things That Matter*, a volume of essays on Mary Shelley, Emily and Charlotte Brönte, George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf. His Lives of the New York Intellectuals: A Group Portrait will be published in early 2015.

Lorrie Moore is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English at Vanderbilt University and the author of the story collections Birds of America, Like Life, and Self-Help and the novels Who Will Run the Frog Hospital? and Anagrams. Her new collection of stories, Bark, will be published at the end of February 2014.

H. Allen Orr is University Professor and Shirley Cox Kearns Professor of Biology at the University of Rochester. He is the author, with Jerry A. Coyne, of Speciation.

 (June 2014)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

Amartya Sen is Thomas W. Lamont University Professor at Harvard. He received the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1998. His most recent book is An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions, cowritten with Jean Drèze.
 (October 2013)

Cass Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. His two new books, Why Nudge? and Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas, were published in March. (June 2014)

Brian Urquhart is a former Undersecretary-General of the United Nations. His books include Hammarskjöld, A Life in Peace and War, and Ralph Bunche: An American Life. His article in this issue draws on his essay in Tyringham Topics.
 (February 2013)

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. Her most recent book is Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries.
 (June 2014)

Geoffrey Wheatcroft is the author of The Controversy of Zion, The Strange Death of Tory England, and Yo, Blair!
 (January 2014)