Contents


Living with Islam

Beyond Terror and Martyrdom: The Future of the Middle East by Gilles Kepel, translated from the French by Pascale Ghazaleh

La Peur des barbares: Au-delà du choc des civilisations [Fear of the Barbarians: Beyond the Clash of Civilizations] by Tzvetan Todorov

Transcendental Woman

Margaret Fuller: An American Romantic Life: The Public Years by Charles Capper

Margaret Fuller: Wandering Pilgrim by Meg McGavran Murray

Fuller in Her Own Time: A Biographical Chronicle of Her Life, Drawn from Recollections, Interviews, and Memoirs by Family, Friends, and Associates edited by Joel Myerson

The Universities in Trouble

Pioneering Portfolio Management: An Unconventional Approach to Institutional Investment by David F. Swensen

Tearing Down the Gates: Confronting the Class Divide in American Education by Peter Sacks

Creating a Class: College Admissions and the Education of Elites by Mitchell L. Stevens

Fulfilling the Commitment: Recommendations for Reforming Federal Student Aid in Brief by Sandy Baum, Michael McPherson, and others

Trends in College Spending: Where Does the Money Come From? Where Does It Go? by Jane V. Wellman and others

The Voice of the Eagle

An Oresteia: Agamemnon by Aiskhylos, Elektra by Sophokles, Orestes by Euripides translated from the Greek by Anne Carson

An Oresteia: Part 1: Agamemnon by Aiskhylos, Elektra by Sophokles directed by Brian Kulick and Gisela Cardenas

An Oresteia: Part 2: Orestes by Euripides directed by Paul Lazar, with choreography by Annie-B Parson

Contributors

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author, most recently, of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.

 
(October 2014)

G.W. Bowersock is Professor Emeritus of Ancient History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. (August 2014)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His book Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.

Andrew Delbanco is Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia. He is working on a book about the United States in the 1850s.
 (March 2014)

Hugh Eakin is a senior editor at The New York Review, where he also edits the Review’s online daily magazine, the NYRblog. He has reported for the Review from several countries in Arabia and the Levant. (Fall 2014)

John Gross (1935–2011) was an English editor and critic. From 1974 to 1981, he was editor of The Times Literary Supplement; he also served as senior book editor and critic at The New York Times. His memoir, A Double Thread, was published in 2001.

Joshua Hammer is a former Newsweek bureau chief and correspondent-at-large in Africa and the Middle East. His new book, Taking Timbuktu, will be published next year. His report in this issue was supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.
 (May 2014)

Anthony Lewis, a former columnist for The New York Times, has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book is Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment.

Avishai Margalit is Professor Emeritus of Philosophy at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is the winner of the 2012 Ernst Bloch Prize in philosophy.


Ingrid D. Rowland is a professor, based in Rome, at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she is the author of The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome and The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery. She has also published a translation of Vitruvius’ Ten Books of Architecture and a history of Villa Taverna, the US ambassador’s residence in Rome. Her new book is From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town.


Robert M. Solow, Institute Professor Emeritus of Economics at MIT, won the 1987 Nobel Prize in economics. His most recent book is Work and Welfare. (May 2009)

Arlen Specter is the Senior Republican United States Senator from Pennsylvania and Ranking Member on the Senate Judiciary Committee. (May 2009)

Michael Walzer is Professor Emeritus in the School of ­Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study and Co-editor Emeritus of Dissent magazine. He is the author most recently of In God’s Shadow: Politics in the Hebrew Bible. (March 2014)

Garry Wills holds the Alonzo L. McDonald Family Chair on the Life and Teachings of Jesus and Their Impact on Culture at Emory.

Michael Wood is the Charles Barnwell Straut Class of 1923 Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. His books include Literature and the Taste of Knowledge and Yeats and Violence