Contents


American Pastoral

Dorothea Lange: A Life Beyond Limits by Linda Gordon

Daring to Look: Dorothea Lange’s Photographs and Reports from the Field by Anne Whiston Spirn

Heroes from Hungary

Double Exile: Migrations of Jewish-Hungarian Professionals Through Germany to the United States, 1919–1945 by Tibor Frank

Enemies of the People: My Family’s Journey to America by Kati Marton

Napoleon’s Eye

Dominique-Vivant Denon: L’oeil de Napoléon an exhibition at the Louvre, Paris, October 20, 1999–January 17, 2000

No Tomorrow by Vivant Denon, translated from the French by Lydia Davis, and with an introduction by Peter Brooks

Inventing the Louvre: Art, Politics, and the Origins of the Modern Museum in Eighteenth-Century Paris by Andrew McClellan

Breaking a Conspiracy of Silence

Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide by Nicholas D. Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn

Creating a World Without Poverty: Social Business and the Future of Capitalism by Muhammad Yunus, with Karl Weber

Can Our Shameful Prisons Be Reformed?

Race, Incarceration, and American Values by Glenn C. Loury, with Pamela S. Karlan, Tommie Shelby, and Loïc Wacquant

Let’s Get Free: A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice by Paul Butler

Releasing Prisoners, Redeeming Communities: Reentry, Race, and Politics by Anthony C. Thompson

A Great Jump to Disaster?

The Vanishing Face of Gaia: A Final Warning by James Lovelock

James Lovelock: In Search of Gaia by John Gribbin and Mary Gribbin

The Medea Hypothesis: Is Life on Earth Ultimately Self-Destructive? by Peter Ward

Contributors

Bernard Bailyn is Adams University Professor Emeritus at Harvard. His most recent books include Atlantic History: Concept and Contours and To Begin the World Anew. 
(November 2009)

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.

Richard Bernstein was Time‘s bureau chief in China and a foreign correspondent for The New York Times. His new book, China 1945: Mao’s Revolution and America’s Fateful Choice, will be ­published this fall.
 (April 2014)

Peter Brooks is Sterling Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature at Yale and Andrew W. Mellon Scholar at Princeton. His books include The Melodramatic Imagination, Reading for the Plot, and, as editor, the recently published The Humanities and Public Life.

Dan Chiasson’s fourth collection of poetry is Bicentennial.
 (September 2014)

David Cole is the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law Center. He is the author of several books, including The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009), Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror (with Jules Lobel, 2007) and Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism (2003).

Andrew Delbanco is Levi Professor in the Humanities at Columbia. He is working on a book about the United States in the 1850s.
 (March 2014)

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

Tim Flannery is a founding member of the Climate Council and 
former Chief Commissioner of the Australian Climate Commission. His most recent book is Among the Islands: Adventures in the Pacific. (August 2014)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review on the subject of technology. She is the editor of NYRB Lit and scholar-in-residence at Middlebury. Her most recent book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home.
 (July 2014)

Joost Hiltermann is the Chief Operating Officer of the International Crisis Group and the author of A Poisonous Affair: America, Iraq, and the Gassing of Halabja. (July, 2014)

Pico Iyer is a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University. He is the author of several books, including Video Night in Kathmandu, The Lady and the Monk, and The Global Soul. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and other publications and his most recent book is The Man Within My Head.

Michael Kimmelman is Chief Architecture Critic of The New York Times.
 (June 2014)

David Lodge is a novelist and critic and Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, England. His novels include Changing Places, Small World, Nice Work, and A Man of Parts. His most recent works of criticism are Consciousness and the Novel and The Year of Henry James.

Peter Matthiessen won the 2008 National Book Award for his novel Shadow Country. His recent books include End of the Earth: Voyage to Antarctica and The Birds of Heaven: Travels with Cranes. (November 2009)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

David Shulman is the Renee Lang Professor of Humanistic Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an activist in Ta’ayush, Arab-Jewish Partnership. His latest book is More Than Real: A History of the Imagination in South India.
 (May 2014)

Derek Walcott is a poet, playwright, essayist, and visual artist. Born in Castries, St. Lucia, he won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1992. His epic poem Omerosis a reworking of the Homeric story and tradition into a journey around the Caribbean and beyond to the American West and London.