What Is an Andy Warhol?

I Sold Andy Warhol (Too Soon) by Richard Polsky

Andy Warhol by Arthur C. Danto

Pop: The Genius of Andy Warhol by Tony Scherman and David Dalton

Joe Simon-Whelan et al. v. the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc., et al.

Freedom Through Cooking

Catching Fire: How Cooking Made Us Human by Richard Wrangham

Finding Our Tongues: Mothers, Infants, and the Origins of Language by Dean Falk

Who Was the Most Famous of All?

Joseph Jefferson: Dean of the American Theatre by Arthur W. Bloom

The Man Who Was Rip Van Winkle: Joseph Jefferson and Nineteenth-Century American Theatre by Benjamin McArthur

The Autobiography of Joseph Jefferson by Joseph Jefferson

The Dear, Dear Friend

The Ballad of Dorothy Wordsworth: A Life by Frances Wilson

The Grasmere and Alfoxden Journals by Dorothy Wordsworth, edited and with an introduction and notes by Pamela Woof


Julian Bell is a painter and writer. His painting sequence Genesis is published in book form this October.

 (October 2015)

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Elizabeth Drew is a regular contributor to The New York Review and the author, most recently, of Washington Journal: 
Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall.
 (November 2015)

Hugh Eakin is a Senior Editor at The New York Review. His reporting on the Syrian humanitarian crisis is included in Flight from Syria: Refugee Stories, published this month by the Pulitzer Center.
 (October 2015)

Robert Gottlieb has been Editor in Chief of Simon and Schuster, Knopf, and The New Yorker. His most recent book is Great ­Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens.
 (June 2015)

Joshua Hammer is a former Newsweek bureau chief and ­correspondent-at-large in Africa and the Middle East. His forthcoming book is The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu: And Their Race to Save the World’s Most Precious Manuscripts.
 (November 2015)

J. Hoberman’s books include Film After Film (Or, What Became of 21st Century Cinema?) and An Army of Phantoms: American Movies and the Making of the Cold War.

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

Karl Kirchwey directs the Creative Writing Program at Boston University. His poem in this issue is from his new collection, Stumbling Blocks: Roman Poems. (July 2015)

Adam Kirsch is director of the master’s program in Jewish Studies at Columbia. His new book of poetry, Emblems of the Passing World: Poems After Photographs by August Sander, has just been published. (December 2015)

Anthony Lewis, a former columnist for The New York Times, has twice won the Pulitzer Prize. His latest book is Freedom for the Thought That We Hate: A Biography of the First Amendment.

Bei Ling, a poet and essayist, is a founder and editor of Qing Xiang, an exile literary journal founded in 1993, now based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and published in Chinese. He is also the founder and Executive Director of the Independent Chinese PEN Center, an organization of Chinese writers and intellectuals dedicated to the freedom of expression.
 (October 2009)

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College.

Claire Messud is the author of four novels and a book of novellas. Her novel The Emperor’s Children was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and was selected as one of the ten best books of 2006 by The New York Times. Her most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. She lives with her family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Steven Mithen is Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Early Prehistory at the University of Reading. His books include The Prehistory of the Mind, After the Ice: A Global Human History, The Singing Neanderthals, and, most recently, Thirst: Water and Power in the Ancient World.
 (November 2015)

Norman Rush was raised in Oakland, California, and graduated from Swarthmore College in 1956. He has been an antiquarian book dealer, a college instructor, and, with his wife Elsa, he lived and worked in Africa from 1978 to 1983. They now reside in Rockland County, New York. His stories have appeared in The New Yorker, The Paris Review, and Best American Short Stories. Whites, a collection of stories, was published in 1986, and his first novel, Mating, the recipient of the National Book Award, was published in 1991. His most recent novel is Subtle Bodies.

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. The Lunatic, his new ­volume of poetry, and The Life of Images, a book of his selected prose, were published in April.

Jonathan Spence is Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. Among his books are The Death of Woman Wang, Treason by the Book, The Question of Hu, and The Search for Modern China.

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast and the Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas. (November 2015)

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas at Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book is To Explain the World: The Discovery of Modern Science.

Lawrence Weschler is the Director of the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University. Earlier this year he published True to Life: Twenty-five Years of Conversations with David Hockney and an expanded edition of Seeing Is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees: Over Thirty Years of Conversationswith Robert Irwin. (October 2009)

Geoffrey Wheatcroft is the author of The Controversy of Zion, The Strange Death of Tory England, and Yo, Blair! (June 2015)