Contents


The Light on the Castle

Christen Købke: Danish Master of Light an exhibition at the National Gallery, London, March 17–June 13, 2010; and at the National Gallery Complex, Edinburgh, July 4–October 3, 2010

North Korea: The Crisis of Faith

Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea by Barbara Demick

The Hidden People of North Korea: Everyday Life in the Hermit Kingdom by Ralph Hassig and Kongdan Oh

The Cleanest Race: How North Koreans See Themselves—and Why It Matters by B.R. Myers

America First?

Best European Fiction 2010 edited and with an introduction by Aleksandar Hemon, with a preface by Zadie Smith

Why Translation Matters by Edith Grossman

The Novel: An Alternative History, Beginnings to 1600 by Steven Moore

Reality Hunger: A Manifesto by David Shields

A Bold New Bible

The Restored New Testament: A New Translation with Commentary, Including the Gnostic Gospels Thomas, Mary, and Judas by Willis Barnstone

Contributors

Nicholson Baker’s latest novel, The Anthologist, was published in September 2009. (July 2010)

John Banville’s most recent novel is The Blue Guitar. (August 2017)

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. Moral Imagination, a collection of his essays, was recently published in paperback. (November 2016)

Ian Buruma will be the new editor of The New York Review of Books in September 2017. He has been a frequent contributor to the Review since 1985. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Christian Caryl is an editor at The Washington Post‘s Global Opinion section. (January 2017)

David Grossman, who lives near Jerusalem, is the author of The Yellow Wind, a report on life in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. His new novel, To the End of the Land, from which the excerpt in this issue is taken, will be published in September by Knopf. Jessica Cohen’s translations include David Grossman’s Her Body Knows and works by Yael Hedaya, Ronit Matalon, Amir Gutfreund, and Tom Segev. (July 2010)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Frank Kermode (1919–2010) was a British critic and literary theorist. Born on the Isle of Man, he taught at University College London, Cambridge, Columbia and Harvard. Adapted from a series of lectures given at Bryn Mawr College, Kermode’s Sense of An Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction remains one of the most influential works of twentieth-century literary criticism.

Wyatt Mason is a contributing writer for The New York Times Magazine and a Writer-in-Residence at Bard, where he is Senior Fellow of the Hannah Arendt Center. He teaches literature at Eastern Correctional Facility through the Bard Prison Initiative.

(April 2016)

Claire Messud’s most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. (March 2017)

Joyce Carol Oates is the author, most recently, of A Book of American Martyrs. She is Professor Emerita of Humanities at Princeton and currently a Visiting Professor in the English Department at the University of California, Berkeley. (April 2017)

Tim Parks is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, the latest being Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (June 2017)

William Pfaff’s latest book is The Irony of Manifest Destiny: The Tragedy of America’s Foreign Policy.
 (June 2013)

Thomas Powers’s books include The Confirmation, a novel, and The Killing of Crazy Horse. (April 2017)

Jonathan Raban’s books include Surveillance, My Holy War, Arabia, Old Glory, Hunting Mister Heartbreak, Bad Land, Passage to Juneau, and Waxwings. His most recent book is Driving Home: An American Journey, published in 2011. He is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Heinemann Award of the Royal Society of Literature, the PEN/West Creative Nonfiction Award, the Pacific Northwest Booksellers’ Award, and the Governor’s Award of the State of Washington. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Guardian, and The Independent. He lives in Seattle.

Sanford Schwartz is the author of Christen Købke and William Nicholson. (July 2017)

David Shulman is Professor Emeritus at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an activist in Ta’ayush, Arab–Jewish Partnership. He was awarded the Israel Prize for Religious Studies in February. (June 2017)

John Terborgh, who has worked in the Peruvian Amazon since 1973, is Research Professor in the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke and Director of its Center for Tropical Conservation. His latest book, co-edited with James A. Estes, is Trophic Cascades: Predators, Prey, and the Changing Dynamics of Nature.
 (April 2012)

Michael Wood is Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. He is the author of Hitchcock: The Man Who Knew Too Much and America in the Movies, among other books.
 (May 2017)

Charles Wright’s most recent book is Bye-and-Bye: Selected Late Poems. (February 2012)