Contents


Getting to Know Them

The Social Behavior of Older Animals by Anne Innis Dagg

Elephants on the Edge: What Animals Teach Us about Humanity by G.A. Bradshaw

Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals by Temple Grandin and Catherine Johnson

The Hidden Life of Deer: Lessons from the Natural World by Elizabeth Marshall Thomas

Giving Gogol His Head

The Nose an opera by Dmitri Shostakovich, directed by William Kentridge

William Kentridge: Five Themes an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, New York City, February 24–May 17, 2010; the Jeu de Paume, Paris, July 5–September 26, 2010; the Albertina, Vienna, October 30, 2010–January 30, 2011; the Israel Museum, Jerusalem, March 5–May 29, 2011; and the S

Israel’s Holy Warriors

Israel and Its Army: From Cohesion to Confusion by Stuart A. Cohen

Soldiers’ Testimonies from Operation Cast Lead, Gaza 2009 by Breaking the Silence

Israel’s Religious Right and the Question of Settlements a report by the International Crisis Group

Israel’s Materialist Militarism by Yagil Levy

The Perils of His Magic Circle

Early Novels and Stories: Bright Center of Heaven; They Came Like Swallows; Stories 1938–1945; The Folded Leaf; Time Will Darken It; Stories 1952–1956; The Writer as Illusionist by William Maxwell

Later Novels and Stories: The Château; So Long, See You Tomorrow; Stories and Improvisations 1957–1999 by William Maxwell

Taking the Pulse

2010: The Whitney Biennial an exhibition at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City, February 25–May 30, 2010.

Skin Fruit: Selections from the Dakis Joannou Collection an exhibition at the New Museum, New York City, March 3–June 6, 2010.

A Great Russian Writer in the Communist Cauldron

The Foundation Pit by Andrey Platonov, translated from the Russian by Robert and Elizabeth Chandler and Olga Meerson, and with an afterword by Robert Chandler and Olga Meerson

Soul and Other Stories by Andrey Platonov, translated from the Russian by Robert and Elizabeth Chandler, with Katia Grigoruk, Angela Livingstone, Olga Meerson, and Eric Naiman, and with an afterword by John Berger

Contributors

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author, most recently, of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.

 
(October 2014)

G.W. Bowersock is Professor Emeritus of Ancient History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. (August 2014)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His book Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.

Dan Chiasson’s fourth collection of poetry is Bicentennial.
 (September 2014)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Orlando Figes is Professor of History at Birkbeck College, University of London. He is the author, among other books, of The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin’s Russia, A People’s Tragedy: The Russian Revolution: 1891–1924, and Natasha’s Dance: A Cultural History of Russia, and The Crimean War: A History. His latest book is Just Send Me Word: A True Story of Love and Survival in the Gulag and his next book, Revolutionary Russia, 1891–1991, will be published in April 2014.

Tim Flannery is a founding member of the Climate Council and 
former Chief Commissioner of the Australian Climate Commission. His most recent book is Among the Islands: Adventures in the Pacific. (August 2014)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier ­Professor of Political Economy at Harvard. His books include The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth and Day of Reckoning: The Consequences of American Economic Policy Under Reagan and After.
 (October 2014)

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Janet Malcolm was born in Prague. She was educated at the High School of Music and Art, in New York, and at the University of Michigan. Along with In the Freud Archives, her books include Diana and Nikon: Essays on Photography, Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession, The Journalist and the Murderer, The Purloined Clinic: Selected Writings, The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, The Crime of Sheila McGough, and Reading Chekhov: A Critical Journey. She wrote about the trial of Mazoltuv Borukhova, the mother of Michelle, in her book Iphigenia in Forest Hills, just out in paperback. Her collection Forty-One False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers will be published in the spring of 2013.


She lives in New York.

Edward Mendelson is the Lionel Trilling Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University and the literary executor of the estate of W.H. Auden. He is the author of Early Auden, Later Auden, and The Things That Matter, a volume of essays on Mary Shelley, Emily and Charlotte Brönte, George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf. His Moral Agents: Eight Twentieth-Century American Writers will be published in early 2015.

Claire Messud is the author of four novels and a book of novellas. Her novel The Emperor’s Children was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and was selected as one of the ten best books of 2006 by The New York Times. Her most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. She lives with her family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

David Miliband is Foreign Secretary of the United Kingdom. (April 2010)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His most recent book is Stolen Glimpses, Captive ­Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.


John Allen Paulos is Professor of Mathematics at Temple University and the author of Innumeracy and, most recently, Irreligion: A Mathematician Explains Why the Arguments for God Just Don’t Add Up. (April 2010)

Eyal Press is a 2011 Schwartz Fellow at the New America Foundation and a contributing writer at The Nation. His book Beautiful Souls: Saying No, Breaking Ranks, and Heeding the Voice of Conscience in Dark Times will be published next February. (November 2011)

Sanford Schwartz’s reviews have been collected in The Art Presence and Artists and Writers. (August 2014)

Michael Tomasky is a Special Correspondent for The Daily Beast and Editor of Democracy: A Journal of Ideas.

 (December 2014)

Rebecca West (1892-1983) was born Cicily Isabel Fairfield, the youngest of three daughters of Charles Fairfield, a journalist in London, and Isabel Mackenzie, a talented pianist who supported her family by giving music lessons. Fairfield was a brilliant storyteller who entertained his daughters with tales of wild adventures in America and Australia, but he was moody and unreliable, and in 1901 he left his wife and children to go to Sierra Leone, where he hoped to start a pharmaceutical plant. The plan failed, and he returned to London, though not to his family, dying when Cicily was fourteen. Inspired by such stars of the stage as Sarah Bernhardt and Mrs. Patrick Campbell, Cicily hoped to become an actress, and in 1910 she enrolled in the Academy of Dramatic Art. Soon, however, she abandoned her theatrical ambitions and joined the staff of the feminist journal The Freewoman, for which she began to write regularly under the name of Rebecca West (adopted after playing that character in a performance of Ibsen’s Rosmersholm). Among Rebecca West’s protean accomplishments are critical studies of two writers she deeply admired, Henry James and D.H. Lawrence; Black Lamb and Grey Falcon (1941), a vast work about pre-World War II Yugoslavia that combines history, political analysis, and vivid descriptions of travel; The Meaning of Treason (1947); and several novels, beginning with The Return of the Soldier (1918) and including The Fountain Overflows (1956), which is closely modeled on the events of her own childhood.

Blair Worden is Hugh Trevor-Roper’s literary executor. His most recent book is God’s Instruments: Political Conduct in the England of Oliver Cromwell. (January 2014)