Contents


In the World of Facebook

The Accidental Billionaires: The Founding of Facebook, A Tale of Sex, Money, Genius, and Betrayal by Ben Mezrich

Stealing MySpace: The Battle to Control the Most Popular Website in America by Julia Angwin

Contributors

Charles Baxter is the Edelstein-Keller Professor in Creative Writing at the University of Minnesota. His latest book, Gryphon: New and Selected Stories, was published in paperback in February. (December 2012)

Mischa Berlinski is the author of Fieldwork: A Novel. He lived in Haiti between 2007 and 2011. (June 2013)

Steve Coll is Dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author, most recently, of Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power. (April 2014)

Richard Dorment is the art critic of the Daily Telegraph. Among the exhibitions he has organized is “James McNeill Whistler,” seen at the Tate Gallery, London, the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. 
(June 2013)

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Nazila Fathi is a reporter for The New York Times, formerly based in Tehran.
 (February 2010)

Mark Ford’s Selected Poems will be published in April. He teaches in the English Department at University College London. (February 2014)