Contents


The Food Movement, Rising

Everything I Want to Do Is Illegal: War Stories from the Local Food Front by Joel Salatin

All You Can Eat: How Hungry Is America? by Joel Berg

Eating Animals by Jonathan Safran Foer

Terra Madre: Forging a New Global Network of Sustainable Food Communities by Carlo Petrini, with a foreword by Alice Waters


The Taste for Civilization: Food, Politics, and Civil Society by Janet A. Flammang

How to Understand the Dreyfus Affair

Why the Dreyfus Affair Matters by Louis Begley

For the Soul of France: Culture Wars in the Age of Dreyfus by Frederick Brown

Dreyfus: Politics, Emotion, and the Scandal of the Century by Ruth Harris

Who Was Charles Dickens?

Charles Dickens by Michael Slater

Charles Dickens: His Tragedy and Triumph by Edgar Johnson

Dickens and Women by Michael Slater

Dickens: A Biography by Fred Kaplan

Dickens by Peter Ackroyd

The Invisible Woman: The Story of Nelly Ternan and Charles Dickens by Claire Tomalin

The Life of Charles Dickens by John Forster

A Supreme Difference

American Original: The Life and Constitution of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia by Joan Biskupic

John Paul Stevens: An Independent Life by Bill Barnhart and Gene Schlickman

Not Rembrandt, But…

Jan Lievens: A Dutch Master Rediscovered a recent exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; the Milwaukee Art Museum; and the Rembrandthuis, Amsterdam

Was Washington ‘Mad for Glory’?

An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson by Andro Linklater

The Ascent of George Washington: The Hidden Political Genius of an American Icon by John Ferling

Contributors

Hilton Als is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author, most recently, of White Girls.

Peter Beinart is the author of The Crisis of Zionism. He is an Associate Professor at the City University of New York, Editor of OpenZion.Com at The Daily Beast, and a fellow at the New America Foundation. (September 2013)

Michael Dirda, a weekly book columnist for The Washington Post, received the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for criticism. He is the author of the memoir An Open Book and of four collections of essays: Readings, Bound to Please, Book by Book, and Classics for Pleasure. His most recent book, On Conan Doyle, received a 2012 Edgar Award for best critical/biographical work of the year.
 Dirda graduated with Highest Honors in English from Oberlin College and earned a Ph.D. in comparative literature (medieval studies and European romanticism) from Cornell University. He is a contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, the online Barnes & Noble Review, and several other periodicals, as well as a frequent lecturer and an occasional college teacher.

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Robert Gildea is Professor of Modern History at Oxford University. His most recent book is Children of the Revolution: The French, 1799–1914. (June 2010)

Robert Gottlieb has been Editor in Chief of Simon and Schuster, Alfred A. Knopf, and The New Yorker. His latest book is Great Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens. (December 2013)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review on the subject of technology. She is the editor of NYRB Lit and scholar-in-residence at Middlebury. Her most recent book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home.
 (July 2014)

Adam Kirsch is a senior editor at The New Republic and a columnist for Tablet. His most recent book is Why Trilling Matters. (July 2014)