Contents


The Afterglow of John La Farge

John La Farge’s Second Paradise: Voyages in the South Seas, 1890–1891 an exhibition at the Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, Connecticut, October 19, 2010–January 2, 2011; and the Addison Gallery of American Art, Andover, Massachusetts, January 22–March 27, 2011

The Epidemic of Mental Illness: Why?

The Emperor’s New Drugs: Exploding the Antidepressant Myth by Irving Kirsch

Anatomy of an Epidemic: Magic Bullets, Psychiatric Drugs, and the Astonishing Rise of Mental Illness in America by Robert Whitaker

Unhinged: The Trouble With Psychiatry—A Doctor’s Revelations About a Profession in Crisis by Daniel Carlat

Hello to All That!

To End All Wars: A Story of Loyalty and Rebellion, 1914–1918 by Adam Hochschild

Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of World War I by Michael S. Neiberg

Mind Control & the Internet

World Wide Mind: The Coming Integration of Humanity, Machines, and the Internet by Michael Chorost

The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You by Eli Pariser

You Are Not a Gadget: A Manifesto by Jaron Lanier

Death and Drugs in Colombia

Y refundaron la patria…: De cómo mafiosos y políticos reconfiguraron el Estado colombiano [And They Refounded the Nation…: How Mafiosi and Politicians Reconfigured the Colombian State] edited by Claudia López Hernández

The High Price of the New Beijing

Beijing Record: A Physical and Political History of Planning Modern Beijing by Wang Jun

Mao’s New World: Political Culture in the Early People’s Republic by Chang-tai Hung

Cities Surround the Countryside: Urban Aesthetics in Postsocialist China by Robin Visser

The Forbidden City by Geremie R. Barmé

The Concrete Dragon: China’s Urban Revolution and What It Means for the World by Thomas J. Campanella

Remaking Beijing: Tiananmen Square and the Creation of a Political Space by Wu Hung

A New Approach to the Holocaust

Holocaust: The Nazi Persecution and Murder of the Jews by Peter Longerich

Heinrich Himmler: Biographie by Peter Longerich

Model Nazi: Arthur Greiser and the Occupation of Western Poland by Catherine Epstein

The “Final Solution” in Riga: Exploitation and Annihilation, 1941–1944 by Andrej Angrick and Peter Klein, translated from the German by Ray Brandon

Contributors

Marcia Angell is a member of the faculty of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the former Editor in Chief of The New England Journal of Medicine. 
(June 2017)

John Ashbery’s new book of poems, Commotion of the Birds, will be published in November. (August 2016)

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.
 (April 2017)

István Deák is Seth Low Professor Emeritus at Columbia. He is the author, with Jan Gross and Tony Judt, of The Politics of Retribution in Europe: World War II and Its Aftermath.

Hugh Eakin has previously written on Denmark and Norway for The New York Review. (January 2017)

Mark Ford’s latest book, Thomas Hardy: Half a Londoner, was published in October. He teaches in the English Department at University College London.
 (December 2016)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier Professor of Political Economy at Harvard. His books include The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth and Day of Reckoning: The Consequences of American Economic Policy Under Reagan and After.

 (November 2016)

Award-winning publisher, editor, and author Slavko Goldstein was born in 1928 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and grew up in Karlovac, Croatia. During the Holocaust, he lost his father and most of the members of his father’s and mother’s families. His mother saved him and his brother Danko by joining the Partisans in 1942, in which he served until 1945, achieving the rank of lieutenant at the age of seventeen and becoming one of the youngest officers in the Partisan army. After the war, he worked as a journalist and editor for several leading Croatian newspapers and as a scriptwriter for feature and documentary films. As the director of University Publisher Liber Zageb and then as the publisher and editor of Novi Liber for more than forty years, he has been responsible for the publication of many important works of Yugoslav and Croatian literature and on Croatian social life. He was president of the Jewish Community of Zagreb from 1986-1990 and the founder and president of the first non-communist political party in Croatia from 1989-1990. From 2001 to 2005 he was the president of the Council of the Jasenovac Memorial Center. He has been awarded about twenty prizes for his journalistic, film, and editorial work. The Croatian edition of his latest book, 1941: The Year that Keeps Returning, won four different prizes as the best publication in Croatia in 2007, and the Krunoslav Sukić Award as the book of the decade in the field of nonviolence, human rights, and civil society.

Stephen Greenblatt is Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard. His new book, The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve, will be published in September. (April 2017)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review and a Scholar-in-Residence at Middlebury. Her latest book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home. (July 2017)

Ian Johnson reports from Beijing and Berlin. His new book, The Souls of China: The Return of Religion After Mao, was published in April. He received the 2016 Shorenstein Journalism Award.
 (June 2017)

Nick Laird’s third collection of poetry is Go Giants. (April 2015)


Perry Link is Chancellorial Chair at the University of California at Riverside. His recent books include An Anatomy of Chinese: Rhythm, Metaphor, Politics and a translation of the memoirs of the Chinese astrophysicist Fang Lizhi, entitled The Most Wanted Man in China: My Journey from Scientist to Enemy of the State. (November 2016)

Fang Lizhi, an astrophysicist and former vice-president of the University of Science and Technology of China, was expelled from the Communist Party of China in 1987. He was granted asylum at the US embassy in Beijing before leaving the country in 1990. He is the 1989 recipient of the Robert F. Kennedy Human Rights Award and is a professor of physics at the University of Arizona. (November 2011)

Colin McGinn is a philosopher. His books include Philosophy of ­Language: The Classics Explained and Prehension: The Hand and the ­Emergence of Humanity. (June 2016)

Marie Morgan, author of Chariot of Fire, is a historian of nineteenth-century America who frequently collaborates with Edmund Morgan in writing history. (June 2011)

Edmund S. Morgan is Sterling Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. His most recent book is The Genuine Article: A Historian Looks at Early America. (June 2011)

Timothy Snyder is the Housum Professor of History at Yale. His latest book, On Tyranny: Twenty Lessons from the Twentieth Century, is published on February 28.
 (February 2017)

George Soros is chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC and the Open Society Foundations. (November 2016)

Adam Thirlwell’s most recent novel is Lurid and Cute. (May 2017)

Eliot Weinberger is the editor of the Calligrams series published by the Chinese University of Hong Kong Press and New York Review Books and the literary editor of the Murty Classical Library of India. Among his books of essays are An Elemental Thing and the forthcoming The Ghosts of Birds.
 (February 2016)

Geoffrey Wheatcroft is the author of The Controversy of Zion, The Strange Death of Tory England, and Yo, Blair! (October 2016)

Daniel Wilkinson is Managing Director for the Americas at Human Rights Watch.