Contents


Quicksilver Frans Hals

Frans Hals in the Metropolitan Museum an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, July 26–October 10, 2011

Frans Hals: Style and Substance by Walter Liedtke

Anarchists & Capitalists

Emma Goldman: Revolution as a Way of Life by Vivian Gornick

The President and the Assassin: McKinley, Terror, and Empire at the Dawn of the American Century by Scott Miller

Bolaño: On the Edge of the Precipice

Antwerp by Roberto Bolaño, translated from the Spanish by Natasha Wimmer

The Return by Roberto Bolaño, translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

The Insufferable Gaucho by Roberto Bolaño, translated from the Spanish by Chris Andrews

Between Parentheses: Essays, Articles, and Speeches, 1998–2003 by Roberto Bolaño, edited by Ignacio Echevarría, translated from the Spanish by Natasha Wimmer

Tres by Roberto Bolaño, translated from the Spanish by Laura Healy

Contributors

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.
 (November 2016)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

Frederick C. Crews’s new book, Freud: The Making of an Illusion, will be published in the fall.
 (February 2017)

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His work can be found at www
.markdanner.com.
 (March 2017)

Mark Ford’s latest book is Thomas Hardy: Half a Londoner. He teaches in the English Department at University College London. (October 2017)

Robert Pogue Harrison teaches literature at Stanford. His books include Forests: The Shadow of Civilization and Gardens: An Essay on the Human Condition. (August 2017)

Robert Johnson is Executive Director of the Institute for New Economic Thinking and a Senior Fellow and Director of the Global Finance Project for the Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt Institute.
 (October 2011)

Richard C. Lewontin is Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Professor of Biology at Harvard University. He is the author of The Genetic Basis of Evolutionary Change and Biology as Ideology, and the co-author of The Dialectical Biologist (with Richard Levins) and Not in Our Genes (with Steven Rose and Leon Kamin).

W.S. Merwin was born in New York City in 1927 and grew up in Union City, New Jersey, and in Scranton, Pennsylvania. From 1949 to 1951 he worked as a tutor in France, Portugal, and Majorca. He has since lived in many parts of the world, most recently on Maui in the Hawaiian Islands. He is the author of many books of poems, prose, and translations and has received both the Pulitzer and the Bollingen Prizes for poetry, among numerous other awards. His new poetry collection is The Moon Before Morning.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Thomas Powers’s books include The Confirmation, a novel, and The Killing of Crazy Horse. (April 2017)

Max Rodenbeck is the Middle East Bureau Chief of The Economist. (December 2015)

James Salter, who died on June 19, was a novelist and short-story writer whose books included A Sport and a Pastime, Light Years, Dusk and Other ­Stories, and, most recently, All That Is
. (August 2015)

Sanford Schwartz is the author of Christen Købke and William Nicholson. (October 2017)

Peter Singer is the Ira W. Decamp Professor of Bioethics at Princeton and Laureate Professor at the University of Melbourne. His books include Animal Liberation, Practical Ethics, The Most Good You Can Do, and, most recently, Famine, Affluence, and Morality. (May 2016)

George Soros is chairman of Soros Fund Management LLC and the Open Society Foundations. (November 2016)

Patricia Storace is the author of Heredity, a volume of poems, Dinner with Persephone, a travel memoir about Greece, and Sugar Cane, a children’s book. Her most recent book is the novel A Book of Heaven.
 (July 2016)

John Terborgh, who has worked in the Peruvian Amazon since 1973, is Research Professor in the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke and Director of its Center for Tropical Conservation. His latest book, co-edited with James A. Estes, is Trophic Cascades: Predators, Prey, and the Changing Dynamics of Nature.
 (April 2012)