Contents


The Drama of the World at Night

To Make a World: George Ault and 1940s America an exhibition at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C., March 11–September 5, 2011; the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri, October 8–December 31, 2011; and the Georgia Museum of Art, Athens, Georgia, February 18–

How Google Dominates Us

In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives by Steven Levy

I’m Feeling Lucky: The Confessions of Google Employee Number 59 by Douglas Edwards

The Googlization of Everything (and Why We Should Worry) by Siva Vaidhyanathan

Search & Destroy: Why You Can’t Trust Google Inc. by Scott Cleland with Ira Brodsky

The Pleasures of Rimbaud

Illuminations by Arthur Rimbaud, translated from the French and with a preface by John Ashbery

Poems Under Saturn by Paul Verlaine, translated from the French and with an introduction by Karl Kirchwey

Very Deep in America

Friday Night Lights, Seasons 1–5 a television series created by Peter Berg

Friday Night Lights a film directed by Peter Berg

Friday Night Lights: A Town, A Team, and a Dream by H.G. Bissinger

Triumphant Turkey?

Turkey and the Dilemma of EU Accession: When Religion Meets Politics by Mirela Bogdani

The Mobilization of Political Islam in Turkey by Banu Eligur

Turkey, Islam, Nationalism, and Modernity: A History, 1789–2007 by Carter Vaughn Findley

Streets of Memory: Landscape, Tolerance, and National Identity in Istanbul by Amy Mills

Lopsided India

India: A Portrait by Patrick French

India Calling: An Intimate Portrait of a Nation’s Remaking by Anand Giridharadas

Gorgeous Writings of a Wanderer

The Collected Prose, 1948–1998 by Zbigniew Herbert, edited and with an introduction by Alissa Valles, with a preface by Charles Simic, and translated from the Polish by Michael March and Jarosław Anders, John and Bogdana Carpenter, and Alissa Valles

The Next Election: The Surprising Reality

Pendulum Swing edited by Larry J. Sabato

The Audacity to Win: How Obama Won and How We Can Beat the Party of Limbaugh, Beck, and Palin by David Plouffe

Boiling Mad: Inside Tea Party America by Kate Zernike

Courage to Stand: An American Story by Tim Pawlenty

Contributors

Marcia Angell is a Senior Lecturer in Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School and former Editor in Chief of The New England Journal of Medicine.

 
(March 2014)

Henri Cole’s new collection, Nothing to Declare, from which the poem in this issue is taken, will be published by FSG next year.
 (July 2014)

Elizabeth Drew is a regular contributor to The New York Review. Her most recent book, Washington Journal: Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall, was published in May.

 (September 2014)

Eamon Duffy is Professor of the History of Christianity at the University of Cambridge. His latest book is Saints, Sacrilege and Sedition: Religion and Conflict in the Tudor Reformations.
 (June 2014)

Hugh Eakin has reported for The New York Review from Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Iraq, and Lebanon. His article on Oman was supported by a grant from the Nation Institute’s Investigative Fund.
 (August 2014)

J. H. Elliott is Regius Professor Emeritus of Modern History at the University of Oxford. He is the author of History in the Making.

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2007 he was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.

James Gleick’s latest book is The Information: A History, a Theory, a Flood. He is working on a history of time travel.

Michael Greenberg is the author of Hurry Down Sunshine and Beg, Borrow, Steal: A Writer’s Life. (April 2014)

Andrew Hacker teaches political science at Queens College. He is currently working on a book on mathematics. 
 (January 2014)

Joshua Hammer is a former Newsweek bureau chief and correspondent-at-large in Africa and the Middle East. His new book, Taking Timbuktu, will be published next year. His report in this issue was supported by the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting.
 (May 2014)

Joost Hiltermann is the Chief Operating Officer of the International Crisis Group and the author of A Poisonous Affair: America, Iraq, and the Gassing of Halabja. (July, 2014)

Amina Ismail is a journalist and a photographer in Cairo.

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. Her books include Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce. Her new book, Flyover Lives, was published in January 2014.

Walter Kaiser is the author of Praisers of Folly: Erasmus, Rabelais, Shakespeare. 
(February 2014)

Stephen Kinzer, a former New York Times bureau chief in Nica­ragua, is a visiting fellow at the Watson Institute for International Studies at Brown. His new book is The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War. (December 2013)

Joseph Lelyveld is a former correspondent and Editor of The New York Times. His latest book is Great Soul: Mahatma Gandhi and His Struggle with India. (September 2014)

Phillip Lopate is the author of the essay collections Against Joie de Vivre, Bachelorhood, Being with Children, Portrait of My Body, and Totally, Tenderly, Tragically, and of the novels The Rug Merchant and Confessions of a Summer.

Toby Matthiesen is a research fellow at the University of Cambridge. His book Sectarian Gulf: Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, and the Arab Spring That Wasn’t will be published by Stanford University Press in July 2013.

Edward Mendelson is the Lionel Trilling Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University and the literary executor of the estate of W.H. Auden. He is the author of Early Auden, Later Auden, and The Things That Matter, a volume of essays on Mary Shelley, Emily and Charlotte Brönte, George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf. His Lives of the New York Intellectuals: A Group Portrait will be published in early 2015.

Lorrie Moore is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English at Vanderbilt University and the author of the story collections Birds of America, Like Life, and Self-Help and the novels Who Will Run the Frog Hospital? and Anagrams. Her new collection of stories, Bark, will be published at the end of February 2014.

Aryeh Neier, former Executive Director of Human Rights Watch, is President of the Open Society Institute. He is the author of Taking Liberties: Four Decades in the Struggle for Rights.

H. Allen Orr is University Professor and Shirley Cox Kearns Professor of Biology at the University of Rochester. He is the author, with Jerry A. Coyne, of Speciation.

 (June 2014)

Nathaniel Rich’s most recent novel is Odds Against Tomorrow. He lives in New Orleans. (July 2014)

Charles Rosen is a pianist and music critic. In 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal.

Ingrid D. Rowland is a professor, based in Rome, at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she is the author of The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome and The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery. She has also published a translation of Vitruvius’ Ten Books of Architecture and a history of Villa Taverna, the US ambassador’s residence in Rome. Her new book is From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town.


Sanford Schwartz’s reviews have been collected in The Art Presence and Artists and Writers. (August 2014)

David Shulman is the Renee Lang Professor of Humanistic Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and an activist in Ta’ayush, Arab-Jewish Partnership. His latest book is More Than Real: A History of the Imagination in South India.
 (May 2014)

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He has published some twenty collections of poetry, six books of essays, a memoir, and numerous translations. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Simic’s recent works include Voice at 3 a.m., a selection of later and new poems; Master of Disguises, new poems; and Confessions of a Poet Laureate, a collection of short essays that was published by New York Review Books as an e-book original. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. His New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 was published in March 2013. His article in this issue, August 14, 2014, was delivered as a talk at the Manggha Museum of ­Japanese Art and Technology in Kraków earlier this year, when he was presented with the Zbigniew Herbert International Literary Award.


David Thomson is film critic at The New Republic and has been a frequent contributor to Sight & Sound, Film Comment, The Guardian, and The Independent. He is the author of A Biographical Dictionary of Film and, most recently, The Big Screen: The Story of the Movies. He has also written several novels, including Suspects and Silver Light.

Colin Thubron is the president of the Royal Society of Literature. Among his books are The Lost Heart of Asia, Shadow of the Silk Road, and, most recently, To a Mountain in Tibet. (December 2013)