Contents


Will the Tea Get Cold?

The Tea Party and the Remaking of Republican Conservatism by Theda Skocpol and Vanessa Williamson

The Tea Party: Three Principles by Elizabeth Price Foley

Tea Party Patriots: The Second American Revolution by Mark Meckler and Jenny Beth Martin

They Clamor for Our Attention

The Renaissance Portrait from Donatello to Bellini an exhibition at the Bode-Museum Berlin, August 25–November 20, 2011, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, December 21, 2011–March 18, 2012

Why Not Frack?

The End of Country by Seamus McGraw

Under the Surface: Fracking, Fortunes, and the Fate of the Marcellus Shale by Tom Wilber

Gasland a documentary film by Josh Fox

Schools We Can Envy

Finnish Lessons: What Can the World Learn from Educational Change in Finland? by Pasi Sahlberg, with a foreword by Andy Hargreaves

The Abbey That Jumped the Shark

Downton Abbey a television series created by Julian Fellowes

Below Stairs: The Classic Kitchen Maid’s Memoir That Inspired Upstairs, Downstairs and Downton Abbey by Margaret Powell

A Tale of Two Bishops and a Brilliant Saint

Ambrose and John Chrysostom: Clerics between Desert and Empire by J.H.W.G. Liebeschuetz

Ambrose of Milan: Political Letters and Speeches translated from the Latin with an introduction and notes by J.H.W.G. Liebeschuetz, with the assistance of Carole Hill

Font of Life: Ambrose, Augustine, and the Mystery of Baptism by Garry Wills

Augustine’s Confessions: A Biography by Garry Wills

Once Out of Nature: Augustine on Time and the Body by Andrea Nightingale

Contributors

Stanisław Barańczak is a poet, translator, and literary critic. He won the 2007 Nike Award for the best work of Polish literature published in the previous year and the 2009 Silesius Poetry Award for lifetime achievement. He is a professor of Polish language and literature at Harvard University.

Julian Bell is a painter based in Lewes, England. A new ­rewritten edition of his book What Is Painting? will be published in October. (July 2017)

Elaine Blair is a regular contributor to The New York Review. (July 2017)

Katherine Boo, a Pulitzer-Prize–winning journalist and staff writer at The New Yorker, has spent the last twenty years writing about poverty and how people get out of it. The essay in this issue appears as the prologue to Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity, just published by Random House.
 (March 2012)

Peter Brown is the Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Augustine of Hippo: A Biography and, most recently, Treasure in Heaven: The Holy Poor in Early Christianity. (October 2017)

Andrew Butterfield is President of Andrew Butterfield Fine Arts. He is the author of The Sculptures of Andrea del Verrocchio, among other books. (May 2016)

Clare Cavanagh is Frances Hooper Professor in the Arts and Humanities and Chair of the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures at Northwestern.
 (November 2017)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (October 2017)

Jeffrey Gettleman is the South Asia bureau chief for The New York Times and the author of Love, Africa: A Memoir of Romance, War, and Survival. He was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 2012 for his reporting from Somalia and Sudan. (December 2017)

Stephen Greenblatt is Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard. His new book, The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve, will be published in September. (April 2017)

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce, among other novels, and a memoir, Flyover Lives.
 (October 2017)

Bill McKibben is the founder of 350.org, the Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury, and the author, most recently, of Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist. (February 2017)

Edward Mendelson is Lionel Trilling Professor in the Humanities at Columbia. His latest book is Early Auden, Later Auden: A Critical Biography.
 (September 2017)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Diane Ravitch is Research Professor of Education at NYU. Her most recent book is Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America’s Public Schools. (December 2017)

Wisława Szymborska (1923–2012) won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1996.

Sam Tanenhaus’s books include The Death of Conservatism and Whittaker Chambers. He is writing a biography of William F. Buckley Jr. and is the US Writer at Large for Prospect. (November 2017)

Simon Winchester is the author of The Professor and the Madman, The Man Who Loved China, and Krakatoa, among other books. His new book, The Perfectionists: A Brief History of Precision, will be published next May. (November 2017)