Contents


A Master in the Shadows

Chinese Art in an Age of Revolution: Fu Baoshi (1904–1965) an exhibition at the Cleveland Museum of Art, October 16, 2011–January 8, 2012, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, January 30–April 29, 2012

Bold When It Counted

The Tender Hour of Twilight: Paris in the ’50s, New York in the ’60s: A Memoir of Publishing’s Golden Age by Richard Seaver, edited by Jeannette Seaver

The Mysterious End of the Soviet Union

The Diary of Anatoly Chernyaev, 1991, National Security Archive Electronic Briefing Book No. 345 translated from the Russian by Anna Melyakova and edited by Svetlana Savranskaya

Delo GKChP [The Case of the State Committee on a State of Emergency] by Valentin Varennikov

Chekhov: Behind the Charm

Anton Chekhov: A Brother’s Memoir by Mikhail Chekhov, translated from the Russian by Eugene Alper

Memories of Chekhov: Accounts of the Writer from his Family, Friends and Contemporaries edited and translated from the Russian by Peter Sekirin

Contributors

Neal Ascherson is the author of Black Sea, Stone Voices: The Search for Scotland, and the novel Death of the Frosac. He is an Honorary Professor at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London.
 (October 2017)

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.
 (November 2016)

Louis Begley’s books include Why the Dreyfus Affair Matters and the novel Wartime Lies. His eleventh novel, Killer Come Hither, will be published in 2015.

G.W. Bowersock is Professor Emeritus of Ancient History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. His most recent book is The Crucible of Islam. (December 2017)

T.H. Breen is William Smith Mason Professor of American History at Northwestern. His most recent book is American Insurgents, American Patriots: The Revolution of the People.
 (July 2013)

Ian Buruma has been a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and the magazine’s editor since September 2017. From 2003 to 2017 he was professor of human rights, democracy and journalism at Bard College. Buruma was born in 1951 in The Hague, Holland. He was educated at Leyden University, where he studied Chinese literature and history, and at Nihon University College of Arts, in Tokyo, where he studied cinema. Living in Japan from 1975 to 1981, Buruma worked as a film reviewer, photographer, and documentary filmmaker. In the 1980s, Buruma was based in Hong Kong, where he edited the cultural section of the Far Eastern Economic Review, and from where he later travelled all over Asia as a freelance writer. Buruma was a fellow of the Wissenschaftskolleg in Berlin in 1991, and a fellow of the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC in 1999. He is a fellow of the European Council of Foreign Relations and a board member of Human Rights in China. In 2008, Buruma won the Erasmus Prize for “exceptional contributions to culture society, or social sciences in Europe.” Buruma has written seventeen books, including The Wages of Guilt (1995), Murder in Amsterdam (2006), Year Zero (2013), and Theater of Cruelty (2014). He has won several prizes for his books, including the LA Times Book Prize for Murder in Amsterdam, and PEN-Diamonstein Spielvogel award for the art of the essay for Theater of Cruelty.

David Cole is the National Legal Director of the ACLU and the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. The paperback edition of his book Engines of Liberty: How Citizen Movements Succeed has just been published. (December 2017)

Arlene Croceis the former dance critic for The New Yorker and the author of The Fred Astaire & Ginger Rogers Book.

 (February 2016)

Freeman Dyson is Professor of Physics Emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. His most recent book is Dreams of Earth and Sky, a collection of his writing in these pages. (October 2016)

Jonathan Freedland is an editorial-page columnist for The Guardian. His next novel is To Kill the President, published under the pseudonym Sam Bourne. (July 2017)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier Professor of Political Economy at Harvard and the author of The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth.

 He is currently finishing a book on the historical influence of religious thinking on economic thinking.(October 2017)

Günter Grass, a recipient of the Nobel Prize for Literature, is a novelist, poet, playwright, sculptor, and artist. (April 2012)

Giles Harvey, a former member of The New York Review’s ­editorial staff, is a Senior Editor at Harper’s. (December 2014)

Michael Ignatieff is President of Central European University in Budapest. His books include Isaiah Berlin: A Life and The Lesser Evil: Political Ethics in an Age of Terror.
 (April 2017)

Ian Jack was the editor of The Independent on Sunday and of Granta. He is the author of The Country Formerly Known as Great Britain and he writes regularly for The Guardian.

Amy Knight is a former Woodrow Wilson Fellow. Her most recent book is Orders to Kill: The Putin Regime and Political Murder. (October 2017)

Hermione Lee is President of Wolfson College, Oxford. Her most recent book is a biography of Penelope Fitzgerald. (September 2016)

David Lodge is a novelist and critic and Emeritus Professor of English Literature at the University of Birmingham, England. His novels include Changing Places, Small World, Nice Work, and A Man of Parts. His most recent works of criticism are Consciousness and the Novel and The Year of Henry James.

Alison Lurie is the Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of ten novels, two collections of essays on children’s literature, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent book is Reading for Fun. (March 2017)

Breon Mitchell is Professor of Germanic Studies and Comparative Literature at Indiana University and Director of its Lilly Library.
 (April 2012)

Tim Parks is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, most recently Life and Work: Writers, Readers, and the Conversations Between Them and the novel In Extremis. (November 2017)

Max Rodenbeck is the Middle East Bureau Chief of The Economist. (December 2015)

Jonathan Spence is Professor of History Emeritus at Yale. Among his books are The Death of Woman Wang, Treason by the Book, The Question of Hu, and The Search for Modern China.

John Paul Stevens served as a Supreme Court Justice ­between 1975 and 2010. (October 2014)

John Terborgh, who has worked in the Peruvian Amazon since 1973, is Research Professor in the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences at Duke and Director of its Center for Tropical Conservation. His latest book, co-edited with James A. Estes, is Trophic Cascades: Predators, Prey, and the Changing Dynamics of Nature.
 (April 2012)

Geoffrey Wheatcroft is the author of The Controversy of Zion, The Strange Death of Tory England, and Yo, Blair! (October 2016)

Edmund White has written biographies of Jean Genet, Marcel Proust, and Arthur Rimbaud. His latest book is the novel Our Young Man. His memoir The Unpunished Vice: A Life of Reading will be published next spring. (December 2017)