Contents


Getting Away with It

The Escape Artists: How Obama’s Team Fumbled the Recovery by Noam Scheiber

Pity the Billionaire: The Hard-Times Swindle and the Unlikely Comeback of the Right by Thomas Frank

The Age of Austerity: How Scarcity Will Remake American Politics by Thomas Byrne Edsall

Victory!

The Barnes Foundation: Masterworks by Judith F. Dolkart, Martha Lucy, and Derek Gillman

Renoir in the Barnes Foundation by Martha Lucy and John House

The Architecture of the Barnes Foundation: Gallery in a Garden, Garden in a Gallery by Tod Williams, Billie Tsien, and Kenneth Frampton

The Barnes Foundation: Two Buildings, One Mission by David B. Brownlee

Burmese Days

The Lady and the Peacock: The Life of Aung San Suu Kyi by Peter Popham

Where China Meets India: Burma and the New Crossroads of Asia by Thant Myint-U

Contributors

Charles Baxter is the Edelstein-Keller Professor in Creative Writing at the University of Minnesota. His latest book, Gryphon: New and Selected Stories, was published in paperback in February. (December 2012)

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author, most recently, of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.

 
(October 2014)

Elaine Blair is a regular contributor to The New York Review. (April 2014)

Christian Caryl is a Senior Fellow at the Legatum Institute and the editor of Foreign Policy’s Democracy Lab website. His latest book is Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the 21st Century.

Michael Chabon is the author of several books, including The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier and Klay, The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son and most recently, Telegraph Avenue.

David Cole is the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law Center. He is the author of several books, including The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009), Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror (with Jules Lobel, 2007) and Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism (2003).

Caleb Crain is the author of American Sympathy, a study of friendship between men in early American literature. He has written for The New Yorker, The New York Review of Books, and n+1. His novel Necessary Errors will be published in 2013.

Robert Darnton is Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and University Librarian at Harvard. 
His forthcoming book is Censors at Work: How States Shaped Literature.

Michael Dirda, a weekly book columnist for The Washington Post, received the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for criticism. He is the author of the memoir An Open Book and of four collections of essays: Readings, Bound to Please, Book by Book, and Classics for Pleasure. His most recent book, On Conan Doyle, received a 2012 Edgar Award for best critical/biographical work of the year.
 Dirda graduated with Highest Honors in English from Oberlin College and earned a Ph.D. in comparative literature (medieval studies and European romanticism) from Cornell University. He is a contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, the online Barnes & Noble Review, and several other periodicals, as well as a frequent lecturer and an occasional college teacher.

Deborah Eisenberg is the author of four collections of short stories and a play, Pastorale.
 She is the winner of the 2000 Rea Award for the Short Story, a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Lannan Foundation Fellowship, and five O. Henry Awards. The Collected Stories of Deborah Eisenberg won the 2011 PEN/Faulkner Award. She lives in New York City.

Helen Epstein is a writer specializing in public health and an adjunct professor at Bard College. She has advised numerous organizations, including the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, Human Rights Watch, and UNICEF. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa and has contributed articles to many publications, including The New York Review of Books and The New York Times Magazine.

R. J. W. Evans is a Fellow of Oriel College and Regius Professor of History Emeritus at Oxford. His books include Austria, Hungary, and the Habsburgs: Central Europe, c. 1683–1867. (February 2014)

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

John Gray is Emeritus Professor of European Thought at the London School of Economics. Among his recent books are Straw Dogs: Thoughts on Humans and Other Animals, False Dawn: The Delusions of Global Capitalism, Heresies: Against Progress and Other Illusions, and The Immortalization Commission: Science and the Strange Quest to Cheat Death. His latest book, The Silence of Animals: On Progress and Other Modern Myths, will be published in June 2013.

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and ­Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Princeton. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008.
 (October 2014)

Alison Lurie is Frederic J. Whiton Professor of American Literature Emerita at Cornell. She is the author of two collections of essays on children’s literature, Don’t Tell the Grownups and Boys and Girls Forever, and the editor of The Oxford Book of Fairy Tales. Her most recent novel is Truth and Consequences.


Amit Majmudar’s latest collection of poetry is Heaven and Earth. His second novel, The Abundance, was published in March. (August 2013)

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

Lorrie Moore is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English at Vanderbilt University and the author of the story collections Birds of America, Like Life, and Self-Help and the novels Who Will Run the Frog Hospital? and Anagrams. Her new collection of stories, Bark, will be published at the end of February 2014.

Charles Petersen, an associate editor at n + 1, has written for The Village Voice, The San Francisco Chronicle, and The Wall Street Journal. (December 2010)

Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


Diane Ravitch won the Daniel Patrick Moynihan Prize of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences in 2011 for her “careful use of social science research for the public good.”
 (July 2012)

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He has published some twenty collections of poetry, six books of essays, a memoir, and numerous translations. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Simic’s recent works include Voice at 3 a.m., a selection of later and new poems; Master of Disguises, new poems; and Confessions of a Poet Laureate, a collection of short essays that was published by New York Review Books as an e-book original. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. His New and Selected Poems: 1962–2012 was published in March 2013. His article in this issue, August 14, 2014, was delivered as a talk at the Manggha Museum of ­Japanese Art and Technology in Kraków earlier this year, when he was presented with the Zbigniew Herbert International Literary Award.


Zadie Smith’s most recent novel is NW.

Robin Wells is the coauthor, along with Paul Krugman, of Economics and has taught economics at Princeton, Stanford Business School, and MIT.
 (July 2012)