Contents


The Dreamers

Pre-Raphaelites: Victorian Avant-Garde an exhibition at Tate Britain, London, September 12, 2012–January 13, 2013; the National Gallery, Washington, D.C., February 17–May 19, 2013; and the State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow, June 10–September 30, 2013.

A Bombshell on the American Public’

Emancipating Lincoln: The Proclamation in Text, Context, and Memory by Harold Holzer

Lincoln’s Hundred Days: The Emancipation Proclamation and the War for the Union by Louis P. Masur

The Long Road to Antietam: How the Civil War Became a Revolution by Richard Slotkin

Rise to Greatness: Abraham Lincoln and America’s Most Perilous Year by David Von Drehle

Election by Connection

How to Win an Election: An Ancient Guide for Modern Politicians by Quintus Tullius Cicero, translated from the Latin and with an introduction by Philip Freeman

China: Worse Than You Ever Imagined

Tombstone: The Great Chinese Famine, 1958–1962 by Yang Jisheng, translated from the Chinese by Stacy Mosher and Guo Jian

The Great Famine in China, 1958–1962: A Documentary History edited by Zhou Xun

Mao’s Great Famine: The History of China’s Most Devastating Catastrophe, 1958–1962 by Frank Dikötter

Mubei: Zhongguo liushi niandai dajihuang jiushi [Tombstone: A True History of the Great Famine in China in the 1960s] by Yang Jisheng

Hungry Ghosts: Mao’s Secret Famine by Jasper Becker

Freedom & Diversity: A Liberal Pentagram for Living Together

Europe’s Angry Muslims: The Revolt of the Second Generation by Robert S. Leiken

Muslims in Europe: A Report on 11 EU Cities by the Open Society Institute

The Emancipation of Europe’s Muslims: The State’s Role in Minority Integration by Jonathan Laurence

The New Religious Intolerance: Overcoming the Politics of Fear in an Anxious Age by Martha C. Nussbaum

Immigrant Nations by Paul Scheffer, translated from the Dutch by Liz Waters

Contributors

Anne Applebaum is a columnist for The Washington Post and Slate, and runs the Transitions Forum at the Legatum Institute. 
Her most recent book is Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern ­Europe, 1944–1956.

 (December 2014)

Mary Beard is Professor of Classics at the University of Cambridge. Her Sather Lectures at the University of California, Berkeley, were published in June as Laughter in Ancient Rome: On Joking, Tickling, and Cracking Up.
 (October 2014)

Julian Bell is a painter and writer living in Lewes, England. His Van Gogh: A Power Seething will be published in early 2015. (December 2014)

Robert Brustein is a playwright, director, critic, teacher, founder of the Yale Repertory and American Repertory Theatres, and currently Distinguished Scholar in Residence at Suffolk University. His latest book is Winter Passages.
 (December 2014)

Mark Danner is the author, most recently, of Stripping Bare the Body: Politics Violence War. He is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the ­Humanities at Bard. His writing and other work can be found at markdanner.com.

Tim Flannery is a founding member of the Climate Council and 
former Chief Commissioner of the Australian Climate Commission. His most recent book is Among the Islands: Adventures in the Pacific. (August 2014)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He currently leads the Free Speech Debate project at Oxford (freespeechdebate.com) and is writing a book about free speech.


Peter Green is Dougherty Centennial Professor Emeritus of Classics at the University of Texas at Austin and Adjunct Professor at the University of Iowa. His most recent book is The Hellenistic Age: A Short History. (April 2014)

Alma Guillermoprieto often writes on Latin America in these pages. She lives in Mexico City. (November 2012)

Ian Johnson is a correspondent for The New York Times in ­Beijing. He is writing a book on China’s beliefs and values. (December 2014)

Amy Knight is a former Woodrow Wilson fellow. Her books include Who Killed Kirov: The Kremlin’s Greatest Mystery, Spies Without Cloaks: The KGB’s Successors, and How the Cold War Began: The Igor Gouzenko Affair and the Hunt for Soviet Spies.

Joseph Lelyveld is a former correspondent and editor of 
The New York Times. His latest book is Great Soul: Mahatma ­Gandhi and His Struggle with India. (December 2014)

Janet Malcolm was born in Prague. She was educated at the High School of Music and Art, in New York, and at the University of Michigan. Along with In the Freud Archives, her books include Diana and Nikon: Essays on Photography, Psychoanalysis: The Impossible Profession, The Journalist and the Murderer, The Purloined Clinic: Selected Writings, The Silent Woman: Sylvia Plath and Ted Hughes, The Crime of Sheila McGough, and Reading Chekhov: A Critical Journey. She wrote about the trial of Mazoltuv Borukhova, the mother of Michelle, in her book Iphigenia in Forest Hills, just out in paperback. Her collection Forty-One False Starts: Essays on Artists and Writers will be published in the spring of 2013.


She lives in New York.

James McPherson is George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1989, and, most recently, War on the Waters: The Union and Confederate Navies, 1861–1865.


Claire Messud is the author of four novels and a book of novellas. Her novel The Emperor’s Children was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and was selected as one of the ten best books of 2006 by The New York Times. Her most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. She lives with her family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Jo Pitkin’s most recent collection of poetry is Cradle of the American Circus, published in June.
 (November 2012)

Nathaniel Rich’s most recent novel is Odds Against Tomorrow. He lives in New Orleans. (July 2014)

Sanford Schwartz’s reviews have been collected in The Art Presence and Artists and Writers. (August 2014)

Jean Strouse is the author of Morgan: American Financier as well as Alice James, which won the Bancroft Prize. Her essays and reviews have appeared in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, The New York Times, Newsweek, Architectural Digest, and Slate. She is currently the Sue Ann and John Weinberg Director of the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library.

Edmund White has written biographies of Jean Genet, Marcel Proust, and Arthur Rimbaud. He has also written several novels; the most recent is Jack Holmes and His Friend: A Novel. He teaches creative writing at Princeton. His latest book, States of Desire Revisited: Travels in Gay America, has just been published.