Contents


The Genius of Creative Destruction

Jonathan Swift: His Life and His World by Leo Damrosch

The Cambridge Edition of the Works of Jonathan Swift: Parodies, Hoaxes, Mock Treatises: Polite Conversation, Directions to Servants and Other Works edited by Valerie Rumbold

Here Be Monsters

Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps by Chet Van Duzer

Sea Monsters: A Voyage Around the World’s Most Beguiling Map by Joseph Nigg

Witches and Wicked Bodies an exhibition at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh, July 27–November 3, 2013; and the British Museum, London, September 2014–January 2015

Mesmerized by Germany

Roads to Berlin: Detours and Riddles in the Lands and History of Germany by Cees Nooteboom, translated from the Dutch by Laura Watkinson, with photographs by Simone Sassen

Discovering Orson Welles

Too Much Johnson a film directed by Orson Welles in 1938

My Lunches with Orson: Conversations between Henry Jaglom and Orson Welles edited and with an introduction by Peter Biskind

Orson Welles in Italy by Alberto Anile, translated from the Italian by Marcus Perryman

The Great & Singular Vallotton

Félix Vallotton: Le Feu sous la glace [Félix Vallotton: The Fire Under the Ice] an exhibition at the Grand Palais, Paris, October 2, 2013–January 20, 2014; the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam, February 14–June 1, 2014; and the Mitsubishi Ichigokan Museum, Tokyo, June 14–September 23, 2014

Contributors

John Banville’s most recent novel is The Blue Guitar. (August 2017)

Julian Bell is a painter based in Lewes, England. A new ­rewritten edition of his book What Is Painting? will be published in October. (July 2017)

Christopher Benfey is Mellon Professor of English at Mount Holyoke. He is the author of Red Brick, Black Mountain, White Clay.
 (April 2017)

Peter Brown is the Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton. His latest book is Treasure in Heaven: The Holy Poor in Early Christianity. (May 2017)

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War. His work can be found at www
.markdanner.com.
 (March 2017)

Jason Epstein, former Editorial Director at Random House, was a founder of The New York Review and of the Library of America. He is the author of Eating: A Memoir. (Dectember 2013)

Robert Gottlieb has been Editor in Chief of Simon and Schuster, Knopf, and The New Yorker. His most recent book is the memoir Avid Reader: A Life. (June 2017)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review and a Scholar-in-Residence at Middlebury. Her latest book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home. (July 2017)

Adam Hochschild’s books include To End All Wars and Spain in Our Hearts: Americans in the Spanish Civil War, 1936–1939. He teaches at the Graduate School of Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley. (September 2017)

Nicholas Kenyon is Managing Director of London’s Barbican Centre. His most recent books include the Faber Pocket Guides to ­Mozart and Bach and The City of London: A Companion Guide.
 (September 2015)

Adam Kirsch is a poet and critic. His most recent book is The Global Novel: Writing the World in the 21st Century. (June 2017)

Nick Laird’s third collection of poetry is Go Giants. (April 2015)


Radmila Lazic is the author of seven books of poetry and numerous literary essays. A Wake for the Living, her first collection of poetry in English translation, was published in 2003. (December 2013)

Gideon Lewis-Kraus is the author of A Sense of 
Direction: Pilgrimage for the Restless and the Hopeful. He was the coeditor, with Arnold Eisen, of Philip Rieff’s Sacred Order/Social Order III. (January 2015)

Edward Mendelson is Lionel Trilling Professor in the Humanities at Columbia. His latest book is Early Auden, Later Auden: A Critical Biography.
 (September 2017)

Lorrie Moore is the Gertrude Conaway Vanderbilt Professor of English at Vanderbilt and the author of four story collections and three novels. Her most recent novel is A Gate at the Stairs and her most recent collection of stories is Bark. (August 2017)

Fintan O’Toole is a columnist with The Irish Times and Leonard L. Milberg visiting lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His writings on Brexit have won both the European Press Prize and the Orwell Prize for journalism. (September 2017)

Joyce Carol Oates is the author, most recently, of the novel A Book of American Martyrs and the story collection Dis mem ber. She is currently Distinguished Writer in Residence in the Graduate Program at NYU. (September 2017)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His books include Sonata for Jukebox and Stolen Glimpses, Captive Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.
 (September 2017)

Cathleen Schine’s most recent novel is They May Not Mean to But They Do. (August 2017)

Amartya Sen teaches economics and philosophy at Harvard. He was awarded the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics in 1998. (June 2017)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. His new book, Scribbled in the Dark, a volume of poetry, will be published in June.
 (June 2017)

Colin Thubron is the President of the Royal Society of Literature and the author of The Lost Heart of Asia, Shadow of the Silk Road, and, most recently, Night of Fire, a novel. (June 2017)

Marina Warner is President of the Royal Society of Literature and Professor of English and Creative Writing at Birkbeck College, University of London. Her books include Alone of All Her Sex: The Myth and the Cult of the Virgin Mary and Once Upon a Time: A Short History of Fairy Tale.
 (September 2017)

Michael Wood is Professor Emeritus of English and Comparative Literature at Princeton. He is the author of Hitchcock: The Man Who Knew Too Much and America in the Movies, among other books.
 (May 2017)

Christopher de Bellaigue’s most recent book is The Islamic Enlightenment: The Struggle Between Faith and Reason, 1798 to Modern Times. (July 2017)