Contents


Surrealism Made Fresh

Drawing Surrealism an exhibition at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, October 21, 2012–January 6, 2013; and the Morgan Library and Museum, New York City, January 25–April 21, 2013

Afghanistan: The Way to Peace

Afghanistan from the Cold War Through the War on Terror by Barnett R. Rubin

Talibanistan: Negotiating the Borders Between Terror, Politics, and Religion edited by Peter Bergen with Katherine Tiedemann

Fountainhead of Jihad: The Haqqani Nexus, 1973–2012 by Vahid Brown and Don Rassler

The Sensual Vision of Oscar Niemeyer

Oscar Niemeyer by Philip Jodidio

Architecture of Brazil, 1900–1990 by Hugo Segawa

Lessons from Modernism: Environmental Design Considerations in 20th Century Architecture, 1925–1970 an exhibition at the Cooper Union, New York City, January 29–March 16, 2013

Will the Chinese Be Supreme?

Eclipse: Living in the Shadow of China’s Economic Dominance by Arvind Subramanian

The Rise of China vs. the Logic of Strategy by Edward N. Luttwak

Restless Empire: China and the World Since 1750 by Odd Arne Westad

The Nightmare of the West Memphis Three

Paradise Lost: The Child Murders at Robin Hood Hills (1996), Paradise Lost 2: Revelations (2000), Paradise Lost 3: Purgatory (2011) three films directed by Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky

West of Memphis a film directed by Amy Berg

Life After Death by Damien Echols

Contributors

Fred Anderson is Professor of History at the University of Colorado. He studied under the direction of Bernard Bailyn at Harvard. He is currently Archie K. Davis Fellow at the National Humanities Center in North Carolina.
 (April 2013).

Russell Baker is a former columnist and correspondent for The New York Times and The Baltimore Sun. His books include The Good Times, Growing Up, and Looking Back.

Daniel Barenboim is General Music Director of the Berlin Staatsoper and its orchestra. He is Music Director of the Teatro alla Scala and cofounder of the West-Eastern Divan Orchestra. (June 2013)

Robert Brustein’s latest play is a musical, King of the Schnorrers, with the composer Hankus Netsky. In 2010 he was awarded the National Medal of Arts.

 (September 2013)

David Cole is the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law Center. He is the award-winning author of several books, including The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009), Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror (with Jules Lobel, 2007) and Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism (2003) He has been awarded an Open Society Foundation Fellowship for 2012–2013 to write his next book, on the role of civil society in enforcing constitutional rights.


Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


Edward Jay Epstein is an investigative journalist. His new book, The Annals of Unsolved Crime, was published in March 2013. His Web site is edwardjayepstein.com.

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

Michael Gorra’s Portrait of a Novel: Henry James and the Making of an American Masterpiece (2012) was a finalist for both the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Critics Circle Award in Biography. His earlier books include After Empire: Scott, Naipaul, and Rushdie (1997) and The Bells in Their Silence: Travels Through Germany (2004). He has taught at Smith College since 1985, where he is now the Mary Augusta Jordan Professor of English. He lives in Northampton, Massachusetts, with his wife and daughter.

Michael Greenberg is the author of Hurry Down Sunshine and Beg, Borrow, Steal: A Writer’s Life. (April 2014)

Miguel Hernández Gilabert (1910–1942) was born into a poor family in the city of Orihuela in southern Spain. His father raised goats and sheep, and Hernández was brought up to be a shepherd. At age eleven, he entered the Jesuit Colegio de Santo Domingo, where he learned to read and write, and started to compose poems whose uncanny virtuosity and wild inspiration earned the admiration of Pablo Neruda and Federico García Lorca. With the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War in 1936, his poetry took on a new public dimension, and Hernández would soon enlist in the Republican Army. In 1937, he married Josefina Manresa Marhuenda, the love of his life. The couple lost their first son to malnutrition; a second, Manuel Miguel, was born in 1939. After the defeat of the Republic, Hernández was condemned to death for his poetry by Francisco Franco, who called him “an extremely dangerous man,” a sentence that was subsequently reduced lest he become a martyr like Lorca. Hernández, imprisoned under brutal conditions and suffering from an advanced case of tuberculosis, continued to write until his death on March 28, 1942; he was thirty-one years old.

Ian Johnson is a Beijing-based correspondent for The New York Times. He won a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of China, and is writing a book on China’s search for values. (June 2014)

Anatol Lieven is a Professor in the War Studies Department of King’s College London and a Senior Fellow of the New America Foundation in Washington, D.C. He is the author of Ukraine and Russia: A Fraternal Rivalry.

Fiona Maccarthy is the author of biographies of Eric Gill, William Morris, and Lord Byron. Her most recent book, The Last Pre-Raphaelite: Edward Burne-Jones and the Victorian Imagination, was published last year. (April 2013)

Leonard Mlodinow’s books include The Drunkard’s Walk: How Randomness Rules Our Lives and Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior. He teaches at Caltech.
 (April 2013)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His most recent book is Stolen Glimpses, Captive ­Shadows: Writing on Film, 2002–2012.


Darryl Pinckney, a longtime contributor to The New York Review of Books, is the author of a novel, High Cotton, and Out There: Mavericks of Black Literature. He has worked for Robert Wilson on various theatrical projects, most recently an adaptation of Daniil Kharms’s The Old Woman.

Nathaniel Rich’s most recent novel is Odds Against Tomorrow. He lives in New Orleans. (July 2014)

Kenneth Roth is the Executive Director of Human Rights Watch. (February 2014)

Sanford Schwartz’s reviews have been collected in The Art Presence and Artists and Writers. (August 2014)

Don Share is the senior editor of Poetry magazine. His books of poetry include Squandermania, Union, and most recently, Wishbone. He is the editor of Seneca in English, Bunting’s Persia, and, with Christian Wiman, The Open Door: One Hundred Poems, One Hundred Years of Poetry Magazine. His translations of Miguel Hernández were awarded the Times Literary Supplement Translation Prize and the Premio Valle Inclán.

Geoffrey Wheatcroft is the author of The Controversy of Zion, The Strange Death of Tory England, and Yo, Blair!
 (January 2014)

Edmund White has written biographies of Jean Genet, Marcel Proust, and Arthur Rimbaud. He has also written several novels; the most recent is Jack Holmes and His Friend: A Novel. He teaches creative writing at Princeton. His book States of Desire Revisited: Travels in Gay America will be published in September 2014.


Jeffrey Yang is an editor at New York Review Books and New Directions. He recently edited Time of Grief: Mourning Poems. (April 2013)