Contents


Are We Puppets in a Wired World?

To Save Everything, Click Here: The Folly of Technological Solutionism by Evgeny Morozov

Hacking the Future: Privacy, Identity and Anonymity on the Web by Cole Stryker

From Gutenberg to Zuckerberg: What You Really Need to Know About the Internet by John Naughton

Predictive Analytics: The Power to Predict Who Will Click, Buy, Lie, or Die by Eric Siegel

Big Data: A Revolution That Will Transform How We Live, Work, and Think by Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Kenneth Cukier

Status Update: Celebrity, Publicity, and Branding in the Social Media Age by Alice E. Marwick

Privacy and Big Data: The Players, Regulators and Stakeholders by Terence Craig and Mary E. Ludloff

The Women and the Thrones

Game of Thrones a television series created by David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, based on A Song of Ice and Fire, by George R.R. Martin

Dreamsongs, Volume 1 by George R.R. Martin

A Song of Ice and Fire a fantasy series by George R.R. Martin:

A Game of Thrones

A Clash of Kings

A Storm of Swords

A Feast for Crows

A Dance with Dragons

The End of the War on Terror?

Remarks by the President at the National Defense University May 23, 2013

What Changed When Everything Changed: 9/11 and the Making of National Identity by Joseph Margulies

Report of the Constitution Project’s Task Force on Detainee Treatment 560 pp.

Bird!

Kansas City Lightning: The Rise and Times of Charlie Parker by Stanley Crouch

How to Deal with the Chinese Police

In the Shadow of the Rising Dragon: Stories of Repression in the New China edited by Xu Youyu and Hua Ze, translated from the Chinese by Stacy Mosher

Zaoyu jingcha: Zhongguo weiquan diyixian qinli gushi [Encounters with the Chinese Police: Stories of Personal Experience at the First Line of Defense of Chinese Rights] edited by Xu Youyu and Hua Ze

Contributors

Stephen Breyer is an Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court. (November 2013)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications.

Michael Chabon is the author of several books, including The Mysteries of Pittsburgh, Wonder Boys, The Amazing Adventures of Cavalier and Klay, The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, Manhood for Amateurs: The Pleasures and Regrets of a Husband, Father, and Son and most recently, Telegraph Avenue.

J. M. Coetzee’s novel The Childhood of Jesus was published in March 2013. He is Professor of Literature at the University of Adelaide and in 2003 was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature.

David Cole is the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law Center. He is the author of several books, including The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009), Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror (with Jules Lobel, 2007) and Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism (2003).

Mark Danner is the author, most recently, of Stripping Bare the Body: Politics Violence War. He is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the ­Humanities at Bard. His writing and other work can be found at markdanner.com.

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


T.S. Eliot (1888–1965) won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948.

Ian Frazier is the author of ten books, including Great Plains, Family, On the Rez, and Travels in Siberia. 
(October 2014)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier ­Professor of Political Economy at Harvard. His books include The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth and Day of Reckoning: The Consequences of American Economic Policy Under Reagan and After.
 (October 2014)

Timothy Garton Ash is Professor of European Studies and Isaiah Berlin Professorial Fellow at St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and a Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford. He has just published, with Edward Mortimer and Kerem Öktem, Freedom in Diversity: Ten Lessons for Public Policy from Britain, Canada, France, Germany and the United States.


Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review on the subject of technology. She is the editor of NYRB Lit and scholar-in-residence at Middlebury. Her most recent book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home.
 (July 2014)

Richard Holmes is the author of Shelley: The Pursuit (published by NYRB Classics), which won the Somerset Maugham Award in 1974; Coleridge: Early Visions, winner of the 1989 Whitbread Book of the Year award; Dr Johnson & Mr Savage, which won the 1993 James Tait Black Prize; and Coleridge: Darker Reflections, which won the 1990 Duff Cooper Prize and Heinemann Award. His new book, Falling Upwards: How We Took to the Air, was published in October 2013. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and was awarded the Order of the British Empire in 1992. He is also a professor of biographical studies at the University of East Anglia. He lives in London and Norwich with the novelist Rose Tremain.

Michael Ignatieff is the Edward R. Murrow Professor of Practice at the Harvard Kennedy School and the author of Fire and Ashes: Success and Failure in Politics. The article in this issue draws on the Ditchley Foundation Annual Lecture, which he gave in July. (September 2014)

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. Her books include Lulu in Marrakech and Le Divorce. Her new book, Flyover Lives, was published in January 2014.

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Ioanna Kohler is a writer-at-large for La Revue des Deux Mondes. (November 2013)

Paul Krugman is a columnist for The New York Times and Professor of Economics and International Affairs at Princeton. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2008. (July 2014)

Perry Link is Chancellorial Chair for Teaching Across Disciplines at the University of California at Riverside. He translated China’s Charter 08 manifesto, published in these pages, and recently 
co-edited No Enemies, No Hatred, a collection of essays and poems by Liu Xiaobo. His latest book isAn Anatomy of Chinese: Rhythm, Metaphor, Politics and he is finishing a translation of the autobiography of the Chinese dissident astrophysicist Fang Lizhi.

Daniel Mendelsohn was born in 1960 and studied classics at the University of Virginia and at Princeton, where he received his doctorate. His essays and reviews appear regularly in The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times Book Review. His books include The Lost: A Search for Six of Six Million; a memoir, The Elusive Embrace; and the collection Waiting for the Barbarians: Essays from the Classics to Pop Culture, published by New York Review Books. He teaches at Bard College. His essay in the September 25, 2014 issue will appear as the introduction to a new translation of The Bacchae by Robin Robertson, to be published in September by Ecco.

Claire Messud is the author of four novels and a book of novellas. Her novel The Emperor’s Children was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and was selected as one of the ten best books of 2006 by The New York Times. Her most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. She lives with her family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Ingrid D. Rowland is a professor, based in Rome, at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she is the author of The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome and The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery. She has also published a translation of Vitruvius’ Ten Books of Architecture and a history of Villa Taverna, the US ambassador’s residence in Rome. Her new book is From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town.


Frederick Seidel’s most recent book of poems is Nice Weather. (June 2014)

Adam Shatz is a Contributing Editor at the London Review of Books and a former Literary Editor of The Nation. (January 2014)

Zadie Smith’s most recent novel is NW. Her essay in the July 10, 2014 issue will appear as an introduction to the new edition of J.G. Ballard’s Crash, to be published by Fourth Estate in the UK.

Helen Vendler is the Arthur Kingsley Porter University Professor in the Department of English at Harvard. Her most recent book is Dickinson: Selected Poems and Commentaries.
 (June 2014)

Steven Weinberg teaches at the University of Texas at Austin. He has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science. His latest book for general readers is Lake Views: This World and the Universe.