Contents


Arendt & Eichmann: The New Truth

Hannah Arendt a film by Margarethe von Trotta

Hannah Arendt: Ihr Denken veränderte die Welt [Hannah Arendt: Her Thought Changed the World] edited by Martin Wiebel, with a foreword by Franziska Augstein

Funny, But Serious Too

Traveling Sprinkler by Nicholson Baker

The Way the World Works: Essays by Nicholson Baker


House of Holes: A Book of Raunch by Nicholson Baker

Which India Matters?

An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions by Jean Drèze and Amartya Sen

Why Growth Matters: How Economic Growth in India Reduced Poverty and the Lessons for Other Developing Countries by Jagdish Bhagwati and Arvind Panagariya

Dreams of a Different China

Wealth and Power: China’s Long March to the Twenty-First Century by Orville Schell and John Delury

Stumbling Giant: The Threats to China’s Future by Timothy Beardson

China’s Silent Army: The Pioneers, Traders, Fixers and Workers Who Are Remaking the World in Beijing’s Image by Juan Pablo Cardenal and Heriberto Araújo, translated from the Spanish by Catherine Mansfield

Cool War: The Future of Global Competition by Noah Feldman

The China Choice: Why We Should Share Power by Hugh White

China Dreams: Twenty Visions of the Future by William A. Callahan

Storms Over Byzantium

Margins and Metropolis: Authority Across the Byzantine Empire by Judith Herrin

Unrivalled Influence: Women and Empire in Byzantium by Judith Herrin

Contributors

Margaret Atwood is the author of The Handmaid’s Tale, Oryx and Crake, and The Blind Assassin, among other novels. Her new novel, MaddAddam, was published in September. (November 2013)

Julian Bell is a painter and writer living in Lewes, England. His Van Gogh: A Power Seething will be published early next year.
 (June 2014)

April Bernard’s most recent collection of poems is Romanticism. Her second novel, Miss Fuller, was published last year.
 (February 2014)

Jeremy Bernstein’s books include Plutonium: A History of the World’s Most Dangerous Element and Nuclear Weapons: What You Need to Know. His latest book is A Palette of Particles.
 (November 2013)

G.W. Bowersock is Professor Emeritus of Ancient History at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. (August 2014)

Michael Dirda, a weekly book columnist for The Washington Post, received the 1993 Pulitzer Prize for criticism. He is the author of the memoir An Open Book and of four collections of essays: Readings, Bound to Please, Book by Book, and Classics for Pleasure. His most recent book, On Conan Doyle, received a 2012 Edgar Award for best critical/biographical work of the year.
 Dirda graduated with Highest Honors in English from Oberlin College and earned a Ph.D. in comparative literature (medieval studies and European romanticism) from Cornell University. He is a contributor to The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, the online Barnes & Noble Review, and several other periodicals, as well as a frequent lecturer and an occasional college teacher.

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied.

Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Masha Gessen is the author of The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin. Her latest book, Words Will Break Cement: The Passion of Pussy Riot, was published in January.
 (May 2014)

David Gilmour’s books include The Last Leopard: A Life of Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa and The Pursuit of Italy: A 
History of a Land, Its Regions, and Their Peoples.
 (March 2014)

Louise Glück’s Poems 1962–2012 was published last year. (November 2013)

Ian Johnson is a Beijing-based correspondent for The New York Times. He won a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of China, and is writing a book on China’s search for values. (June 2014)

Walter Kaiser is the author of Praisers of Folly: Erasmus, Rabelais, Shakespeare. 
(February 2014)

Mark Lilla is Professor of the Humanities at Columbia 
and author of The Stillborn God: Politics, Religion, and the Modern West.



Roger Lowenstein is the author of The End of Wall Street, among other books. He is writing a book about the origins of the Federal Reserve. (November 2013)

Kevin J. Madigan is Winn Professor of Ecclesiastical History and Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs at Harvard Divinity School. (November 2013)

Edward Mendelson is the Lionel Trilling Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University and the literary executor of the estate of W.H. Auden. He is the author of Early Auden, Later Auden, and The Things That Matter, a volume of essays on Mary Shelley, Emily and Charlotte Brönte, George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf. His Lives of the New York Intellectuals: A Group Portrait will be published in early 2015.

Pankaj Mishra lives in London and India. He is the author of The Romantics, winner of the Los Angeles Times’s Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction, and An End to Suffering: The Buddha in the World. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and The Guardian. Mishra’s recent books include Temptations of the West: How to Be Modern in India, Pakistan, Tibet, and Beyond and From the Ruins of Empire: The Intellectuals Who Remade Asia.

Thomas Nagel is University Professor Emeritus at NYU. His latest book is Mind and Cosmos. (November 2013)

Tim Parks, a novelist, essayist, and translator, is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He has recently published the novel Sex Is Forbidden and the travel book Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo.


Francine Prose is a Distinguished Visiting Writer 
at Bard. Her new novel is Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932.

Kenneth Roth is the Executive Director of Human Rights Watch. (February 2014)

Alan Rusbridger is the Editor of The Guardian newspaper, which recently published articles by Glenn Greenwald and its own reporters about the National Security Agency, based on documents leaked by Edward Snowden. His new book, about playing the piano, is Play It Again: An Amateur Against the Impossible. (November 2013)