Contents


The King of the Foxes

The Loudest Voice in the Room: How the Brilliant, Bombastic Roger Ailes Built Fox News—and Divided a Country by Gabriel Sherman

Turkey Goes Out of Control

The Rise of Turkey: The Twenty-First Century’s First Muslim Power by Soner Cagaptay

Gülen: The Ambiguous Politics of Market Islam in Turkey and the World by Joshua D. Hendrick

I˙mamin Ordusu [The Imam’s Army] by Ahmet Şık

Ruskin: The Great Artist Emerges

John Ruskin: Artist and Observer an exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, February 14–May 11, 2014, and the National Galleries of Scotland, Edinburgh, July 4–September 28, 2014

A Passage from Hong Kong

Ninety Percent of Everything: Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car, and Food on Your Plate by Rose George

Go Poets

American Songbook by Michael Ruby

Go Giants by Nick Laird

Nothing by Design by Mary Jo Salter

The Insoluble Question

The Elimination: A Survivor of the Khmer Rouge Confronts His Past and the Commandant of the Killing Fields by Rithy Panh with Christophe Bataille, translated from the French by John Cullen

S21: The Khmer Rouge Killing Machine a film by Rithy Panh

Duch: Master of the Forges of Hell a film by Rithy Panh

He Remade Our World

Decision Points by George W. Bush


Angler: The Cheney Vice Presidency by Barton Gellman

The World According to Dick Cheney a film directed by R.J. Cutler and Greg Finton

In My Time: A Personal and Political Memoir by Dick Cheney, with Liz Cheney

Contributors

Richard Bernstein was Time’s bureau chief in China and a foreign correspondent for The New York Times. His most recent book is China 1945: Mao’s Revolution and America’s Fateful Choice.

 (November 2014)

David Bromwich is Sterling Professor of English at Yale. Moral Imagination, a collection of his essays, was recently published in paperback. (November 2016)

Peter Brooks, Sterling Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature at Yale, teaches at Princeton. His new book, Flaubert in the Ruins of Paris, will be published in April.
 (March 2017)

Christian Caryl is an editor at The Washington Post‘s Global Opinion section. (January 2017)

Dan Chiasson’s fourth collection of poetry is Bicentennial.
 He teaches at Wellesley. (June 2016)

Steve Coll is Dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of ­Journalism. He is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of Ghost Wars: The Secret History of the CIA, Afghanistan, and Bin Laden, from the Soviet Invasion to September 10, 2001.


 (June 2016)

Mark Danner is Chancellor’s Professor of English and Journalism at the University of California at Berkeley and James Clarke Chace Professor of Foreign Affairs and the Humanities at Bard. His most recent book is Spiral: Trapped in the Forever War.
 (December 2016)

Helen Epstein is a writer specializing in public health and an adjunct professor at Bard College. She has advised numerous organizations, including the United States Agency for International Development, the World Bank, Human Rights Watch, and UNICEF. She is the author of The Invisible Cure: Why We Are Losing the Fight Against AIDS in Africa and has contributed articles to many publications, including The New York Review of Books and The New York Times Magazine. Her research for the article in the November 5, 2015 issue was supported by the Open Society Foundations.


R. J. W. Evans is a Fellow of Oriel College and Regius Professor of History Emeritus at Oxford. His books include Austria, Hungary, and the Habsburgs: Central Europe, c. 1683–1867.
 (January 2016)

Maya Jasanoff is Professor of History at Harvard. She is the author of Liberty’s Exiles: American Loyalists in the Revolutionary World and Edge of Empire: Lives, Culture, and Conquest in the East 1750–1850. (October 2016)

Ira Katznelson is Ruggles Professor of Political Science and ­History at Columbia and President of the Social Science Research Council. His latest book is Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time. (April 2014)

Steven Mithen is Deputy Vice-Chancellor and Professor of Early Prehistory at the University of Reading. His books include The Prehistory of the Mind, After the Ice: A Global Human History, The Singing Neanderthals, and, most recently, Thirst: Water and Power in the Ancient World.
 (November 2016)

Joyce Carol Oates is the author, most recently, of Soul at the White Heat: Inspiration, Obsession, and the Writing Life, much of which originally appeared in these pages. She is Distinguished Writer in Residence in the Graduate Program at New York University. (October 2016)

Tim Parks is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He is the author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction. A version of his essay in this issue will appear in Drawn from Life: Selected Essays of Michel de Montaigne, which will be published by Notting Hill Editions in November.
 (November 2016)

Darryl Pinckney’s latest book is a novel, Black Deutschland. (January 2017)

Thomas Powers is the author of Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb, among other books.
 (December 2016)

Frederick Seidel’s latest book of poems is Widening Income Inequality. (January 2017)

Robert Skidelsky is Emeritus Professor of Political Economy at Warwick University, England. His latest book is How Much Is Enough?: Money and the Good Life with Edward Skidelsky. He is the author of a three-volume biography of John Maynard Keynes.
 (April 2014)

Zadie Smith’s new novel, Swing Time, was published in November. (December 2016)

Keith Thomas is an Honorary Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is the author of The Ends of Life: Roads to Fulfilment in Early Modern England.
 (October 2016)

Jenny Uglow’s most recent book is The Pinecone: The Story of Sarah Losh.
 (April 2014)

Garry Wills is Professor of History Emeritus at Northwestern. He is the author, most recently, of The Future of the Catholic Church with Pope Francis. (February 2017)

Christopher de Bellaigue’s forthcoming book is The Islamic Enlightenment: The Struggle between Faith and Reason, 1798 to Modern Times.
 (September 2016)