Contents


Muriel Spark, Moral Hypnotist

The Informed Air: Essays by Muriel Spark, edited and with a preface by Penelope Jardine

Curriculum Vitae: A Volume of Autobiography by Muriel Spark

The Comforters by Muriel Spark

Memento Mori by Muriel Spark

The Bachelors by Muriel Spark

The Ballad of Peckham Rye by Muriel Spark

The Driver’s Seat by Muriel Spark

Territorial Rights by Muriel Spark

Loitering with Intent by Muriel Spark

A Far Cry from Kensington by Muriel Spark

Fearless Malevich

Malevich an exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, October 18, 2013–February 2, 2014; the Art and Exhibition Hall of the Federal Republic of Germany, Bonn, March 8–June 22, 2014; and Tate Modern, London, July 16–October 26, 2014.

Kazimir Malevich and the Russian Avant-Garde: Featuring Selections from the Khardzhiev and Costakis Collections Catalog of the exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum by Sophie Tates, Karen Kelly, Bart Rutten, and Geurt Imanse

Black Square: Malevich and the Origin of Suprematism by Aleksandra Shatskikh, translated from the Russian by Marian Schwartz

The Pillars of Arab Despotism

The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation Is Changing the Middle East by Juan Cole

Temptations of Power: Islamists and Illiberal Democracy in a New Middle East by Shadi Hamid

Heidegger in Black

Überlegungen II–VI (Schwarze Hefte 1931–1938) [Reflections II–VI (Black Notebooks 1931–1938)] by Martin Heidegger, edited by Peter Trawny

Überlegungen VII–XI (Schwarze Hefte 1938/39) [Reflections VII–XI (Black Notebooks 1938/39)] by Martin Heidegger, edited by Peter Trawny

Überlegungen XII–XV (Schwarze Hefte 1939–1941) [Reflections XII–XV (Black Notebooks 1939–1941)] by Martin Heidegger, edited by Peter Trawny

How Stoical Was Seneca?

Dying Every Day: Seneca at the Court of Nero by James Romm

Hardship and Happiness by Lucius Annaeus Seneca, translated from the Latin by Elaine Fantham, Harry M. Hine, James Ker, and Gareth D. Williams

The Greatest Empire: A Life of Seneca by Emily Wilson

On America’s Front Lines

On the Run: Fugitive Life in an American City by Alice Goffman

The Growth of Incarceration in the United States: Exploring Causes and Consequences a report by the National Research Council, edited by Jeremy Travis, Bruce Western, and Steve Redburn

Contributors

Mary Beard is Professor of Classics at the University of Cambridge. Her Sather Lectures at the University of California, Berkeley, were published in June as Laughter in Ancient Rome: On Joking, Tickling, and Cracking Up.
 (October 2014)

David A. Bell is Sidney and Ruth Lapidus Professor in the Era of North Atlantic Revolutions at Princeton. He is the author, most recently, of The First Total War: Napoleon’s Europe and the Making of Warfare as We Know It.
 (July 2014)

Robert Chandler’s translations from Russian include Pushkin’s Dubrovsky; Nikolay Leskov’s Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk; Vasily Grossman’s [An Armenian Sketchbook](http://www.nybooks.com/books/imprints/classics/an-armenian-sketchbook/), [Everything Flows](http://www.nybooks.com/books/imprints/classics/everything-flows/), [Life and Fate](http://www.nybooks.com/books/imprints/classics/life-and-fate/), and [The Road](http://www.nybooks.com/books/imprints/classics/the-road/); and Hamid Ismailov’s Central Asian novel, The Railway. His co-translations of Andrey Platonov have won prizes both in the U.K. and in the United States. He is the editor and main translator of Russian Short Stories from Pushkin to Buida and Russian Magic Tales from Pushkin to Platonov. Together with Boris Dralyuk and Irina Mashinski, he has also compiled an anthology, The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry, to be published in early 2015. He has translated selections of Sappho and Apollinaire. He teaches part time at Queen Mary, University of London and is a mentor for the British Centre for Literary Translation.

Ian Frazier is the author of ten books, including Great Plains, Family, On the Rez, and Travels in Siberia. 
(October 2014)

Benjamin M. Friedman is the William Joseph Maier ­Professor of Political Economy at Harvard. His books include The Moral Consequences of Economic Growth and Day of Reckoning: The Consequences of American Economic Policy Under Reagan and After.
 (October 2014)

Peter E. Gordon is the Amabel B. James Professor of ­History at Harvard and the author, most recently, of Continental Divide: Heidegger, Cassirer, Davos, which won the Barzun Prize from the American Philosophical Society. His ­newest book, Adorno and Existence: Five Lectures, is forthcoming.
 (October 2014)

Jonathan Israel is Modern European History Professor at the Institute for Advanced Study. His latest book is A Revolution of the Mind: Radical Enlightenment and the Intellectual Origins of Modern Democracy. (April 2010)

Christopher Jencks is the Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at Harvard. He is the author of Rethinking Social Policy, among several other books. (October 2014)

Tim Judah is a correspondent for The Economist. For The New York Review he has reported from, among other places, Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.

Anka Muhlstein was awarded the Prix Goncourt in 1996 for her biography of Astolphe de Custine, and has twice received the History Prize of the French Academy. Her books include 
Balzac’s Omelette and, most recently, Monsieur Proust’s Library.

Thomas Nagel is University Professor Emeritus at NYU. His latest book is Mind and Cosmos. (October 2014)

Andrew O’Hagan’s new novel, The Illuminations, will be published early next year. (October 2014)

Tim Parks, a novelist, essayist, and translator, is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. He has recently published the novel Sex Is Forbidden and the travel book Italian Ways: On and Off the Rails from Milan to Palermo.


Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


Alan Ryan’s On Tocqueville and On Marx were published this summer. He is a Visiting Professor of Philosophy at Stanford this year.

John R. Searle is the Slusser Professor of Philosophy at 
the University of California, Berkeley. His most recent book is ­Making the Social World.
 (October 2014)

Tamsin Shaw is Associate Professor of European and ­Mediterranean Studies and Philosophy at NYU and the author of ­Nietzsche’s Political Skepticism. (October 2014)

Nathan Thrall is a Senior Analyst with the Middle East and North Africa Program of the International Crisis Group. 
He lives in Jerusalem.
 (October 2014)

Jeremy Waldron is University Professor at the NYU School of Law. His latest book is Dignity, Rank, and Rights. (October 2014)

Robert F. Worth is currently a fellow at the Woodrow ­Wilson International Center for Scholars, where he is working on a book about the 2011 Arab uprisings and their aftermath. He is a frequent contributor to The New York Times Magazine. (October 2014)