Contents


The American Hero

American Sniper a film directed by Clint Eastwood

American Sniper: The Autobiography of the Most Lethal Sniper in US Military History by Chris Kyle with Jim DeFelice and Scott McEwen

The Godfather of Modernism

“Literchoor Is My Beat”: A Life of James Laughlin, Publisher of New Directions by Ian S. MacNiven

The Collected Poems of James Laughlin edited with an introduction and notes by Peter Glassgold

The Fierce Pressures Facing Pakistan

The Struggle for Pakistan: A Muslim Homeland and Global Politics by Ayesha Jalal

The Army and Democracy: Military Politics in Pakistan by Aqil Shah

Discontent and Its Civilizations: Dispatches from Lahore, New York, and London by Mohsin Hamid

Midnight’s Furies: The Deadly Legacy of India’s Partition by Nisid Hajari

Cuba: The New Opening

Visions of Power in Cuba: Revolution, Redemption, and Resistance, 1959–1971 by Lillian Guerra

Back Channel to Cuba: The Hidden History of Negotiations Between Washington and Havana by William M. LeoGrande and Peter Kornbluh

Beckett in Love

The Letters of Samuel Beckett, Volume III: 1957–1965 edited and translated from the French by George Craig, and edited by Martha Dow Fehsenfeld, Dan Gunn, and Lois More Overbeck

Adam Michnik: A Hero of Our Time

An Uncanny Era: Conversations Between Václav Havel and Adam Michnik edited and translated from the Polish and with an introduction by Elzbieta Matynia

The Trouble with History: Morality, Revolution, and Counterrevolution by Adam Michnik, edited by Irena Grudzinska Gross, and translated from the Polish by Elzbieta Matynia, Agnieszka Marczyk, and Roman Czarny

Malamud’s Secrets

Novels and Stories of the 1940s & 50s by Bernard Malamud, edited by Philip Davis

Novels and Stories of the 1960s by Bernard Malamud, edited by Philip Davis

Contributors

Ian Bostridge is an opera singer and a song recitalist. He is the author of Schubert’s Winter Journey: Anatomy of an Obsession.
 (April 2015)

Ian Buruma is the author of many books, including The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan (1995), The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), and Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013). He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book is a ­collection of essays from these pages, Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the ­Shadows of War. His Year Zero: A History of 1945 is now out in paperback.


Steve Coll is Dean of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He is a staff writer at The New Yorker and the author of Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power.

 (April 2015)

Umberto Eco is President of the Scuola Superiore di Studi Umanistici at the University of Bologna and author of many books, most recently 
How to Write a Thesis.

Deborah Eisenberg is the author of four collections of short stories and a play, Pastorale.
 She is the winner of the 2000 Rea Award for the Short Story, a Whiting Writers’ Award, a Lannan Foundation Fellowship, and five O. Henry Awards. The Collected Stories of Deborah Eisenberg won the 2011 PEN/Faulkner Award. She lives in New York City.

Martin Filler’s latest book, Makers of Modern Architecture, Volume II, has been long-listed for the 2014 PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. Filler was born in 1948 and received degrees in art history from Columbia University. He has been a contributor to The New York Review of Books since 1985 and his writing on modern architecture has been published in more than thirty journals, magazines, and newspapers in the US, Europe, and Japan. His first collection of New York Review essays, Makers of Modern Architecture, was published in 2007. Filler is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He and his wife, the architectural historian Rosemarie Haag Bletter, live in New York and Southampton.

Stephen Greenblatt is Cogan University Professor of the Humanities at Harvard. His most recent books are The Swerve: How the World Became Modern and Shakespeare’s Montaigne. He is the general editor of The Norton Shakespeare.


Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review on the subject of technology and a Scholar-in-Residence at Middlebury. Her most recent book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home.
 (April 2015)

Christopher Jencks is the Malcolm Wiener Professor of Social Policy at Harvard. He is the author of Rethinking ­Social Policy, among several other books. (April 2015)

Enrique Krauze is the author of Redeemers: Ideas and Power in Latin America and Editor-in-Chief of the magazine Letras Libres, published in Mexico City. (April 2015)

Mark Lilla is currently a Fellow of the Paris Institut d’Études Avancées. He is author of The Stillborn God: Religion, Politics, and the Modern West.

Colin McGinn is a philosopher whose books include Consciousness and Its Objects and The Meaning of Disgust. His Philosophy of Language: The Classics Explained has just been published.
 (April 2015)

Edward Mendelson is the Lionel Trilling Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University and the literary executor of the Estate of W. H. Auden. His books include The Things That Matter—about seven novels by Mary Shelley, Charlotte and Emily Brontë, George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf—and Early Auden and Later Auden. He has edited novels by Arnold Bennett, Thomas Hardy, George Meredith, Anthony Trollope, and H. G. Wells, and has written for The New York Review of Books, The Times Literary Supplement, the London Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, The New Republic, and many other publications. His Moral Agents: Eight Twentieth-Century American Writers will be published by New York Review Books in March 2015.


Ligaya Mishan has written for The New Yorker and The New York Times. (April 2015)

Fintan O’Toole is Literary Editor of The Irish Times and Leonard 
L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His latest book is A History of Ireland in 100 Objects.


 (April 2015)

Joyce Carol Oates, the author of the recent novel The Sacrifice, is currently Stein Visiting Writer at Stanford.

Tim Parks is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan and the author of Italian Ways. His latest novel is Sex Is Forbidden.


Elise Partridge is the author of The Exiles’ Gallery, a collection of poetry, which is published this month. Her collected poems will be published in 2016 by NYRB Poets. She died in early 2015. (April 2015)

Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


Ahmed Rashid is the author of Pakistan on the Brink: The Future of America, Pakistan, and Afghanistan and several books on Afghanistan and Central Asia. He lives in Lahore. (April 2015)

Frederick Seidel’s most recent book of poems is Nice Weather. (April 2015)

Michael Shae is a Senior Editor at The New York Review. (April 2015)

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. The Lunatic, his new volume of poetry, and The Life of Images, a book of his selected prose, will be published in April 2015.


Cass Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. His new book, with Reid Hastie, is Wiser: Getting Beyond Groupthink to Make Groups Smarter. (April 2015)

Paul Wilson is a writer based in Toronto. He has translated major works by Josef Škvorecký, Ivan Klíma, Bohumil Hrabal, and Václav Havel. His translation of a collection of Hrabal’s early stories will be published in October as Mr. Kafka and Other Tales from the Time of the Cult. (April 2015)