Contents


The Grandest Art of the Ancients

Portable Classic an exhibition at the Fondazione Prada, Ca’ Corner della Regina, Venice, May 9–September 13, 2015

Serial/Portable Classic: The Greek Canon and Its Mutations Catalog of the exhibitions at the Fondazione Prada, Milan, and Palazzo Corner, Venice, edited by Salvatore Settis with Anna Anguissola and Davide Gasparotto

Serial Classic an exhibition at the Fondazione Prada, Milan, May 9–August 24, 2015

Piccoli Grandi Bronzi an exhibition at the National Archaeological Museum, Florence, March 20–August 31, 2015

Power and Pathos: Bronze Sculpture of the Hellenistic World an exhibition at Palazzo Strozzi, Florence, March 14–June 21, 2015; the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, July 28–November 1, 2015; and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., December 13, 2015–March 20, 2016

The New America: Little Privacy, Big Terror

Data and Goliath: The Hidden Battles to Collect Your Data and Control Your World by Bruce Schneier

The Future of Violence: Robots and Germs, Hackers and Drones: Confronting a New Age of Threat by Benjamin Wittes and Gabriella Blum

A War Like No Other: The Constitution in a Time of Terror by Owen Fiss, edited and with a foreword by Trevor Sutton

Kill Chain: The Rise of the High-Tech Assassins by Andrew Cockburn

The Mystery of ISIS

ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror by Michael Weiss and Hassan Hassan

ISIS: The State of Terror by Jessica Stern and J.M. Berger

Discovery, Bewilderment, Joy

Ashes in My Mouth, Sand in My Shoes by Per Petterson, translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett

I Refuse by Per Petterson, translated from the Norwegian by Don Bartlett

Contributors

Anonymous is a former official of a NATO country with wide experience in the Middle East.
 (August 2015)

Robert Badinter was France’s Minister of Justice from 1981, when he was instrumental in abolishing the death penalty, to 1986, and President of the Constitutional Council from 1986 to 1995. The article in the August 13, 2015 issue originally appeared in Le Monde. (August 2015)

Bernard Bailyn is Adams University Professor Emeritus at ­Harvard. His most recent books are The Barbarous Years: The Peopling of British North America—The Conflict of Civilizations, 1600­–1675 and Sometimes an Art: Nine Essays on History. 
(August 2015)

Christopher R. Browning is Frank Porter Graham Professor of History Emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the author, most recently, of Remembering Survival: Inside a Nazi Slave-Labor Camp. (August 2015)

David Cole is the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. He is the author of several books, including The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009), Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror (with Jules Lobel, 2007) and Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism (2003).

Robert Darnton is Carl H. Pforzheimer University Professor and ­University Librarian Emeritus at Harvard. His latest book is Censors at Work: How States Shaped Literature.

Jim Dwyer is a columnist with The New York Times. His latest book, More Awesome Than Money: Four Boys, Three Years, and a Chronicle of Ideals and Ambition in Silicon Valley, will be published in paperback in November.
 (August 2015)

James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, Fenton was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. His latest book is Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.


Ruth Franklin, the author of A Thousand Darknesses: Lies and Truth in Holocaust Fiction, is at work on a biography of Shirley Jackson.
 (August 2015)

Alice Gregory is a columnist for The New York Times Book ­Review and a contributing editor at T Magazine. She has written for ­publications including The New Yorker, Harper’s, GQ, and n+1. (August 2015)

Sue Halpern is a regular contributor to The New York Review and a Scholar-in-Residence at Middlebury. Her latest book is A Dog Walks into a Nursing Home.

 (August 2015)

Adam Kirsch’s second collection of poems is Invasions. His latest book of essays, Rocket and Lightship, was published last fall.
 (August 2015)

Roderick Macfarquhar is Leroy B. Williams Research Professor of History and Political Science at Harvard. His latest publication as editor and contributor is The Politics of China: Sixty Years of the People’s Republic of China.
 (August 2015)

Kenneth Maxwell , the founder of the Brazil Studies Program at 
Harvard’s David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, is currently 
a weekly columnist for the Brazilian newspaper Folha de São Paulo.
 (August 2015)

Bill McKibben is Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury College, and the author of The End of Nature, Deep Economy: The Wealth of Communities and the Durable Future, Eaarth: Making a Life on a Tough New Planet and, most recently, of Oil and Honey: The Education of an Unlikely Activist. He is also the founder of 350.org, the global climate campaign that has been actively involved in the fight against natural gas fracking.

Claire Messud is the author of four novels and a book of novellas. Her novel The Emperor’s Children was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and was selected as one of the ten best books of 2006 by The New York Times. Her most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. She lives with her family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Anka Muhlstein was awarded the Prix Goncourt in 1996 for her biography of Astolphe de Custine, and has twice received the History Prize of the French Academy. Her books include 
Balzac’s Omelette and, most recently, Monsieur Proust’s Library.

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His ­seventh collection of poetry, In a Mist, was published in March 2015.

Joyce Carol Oates was Stein Visiting Writer at Stanford for the spring 2015 term. Her most recent novel is Jack of Spades. Her ­essay in the August 13, 2015 issue was delivered as the Robert B. Silvers Lecture at the 
New York Public Library in December 2014.


Tim Parks is Associate Professor of Literature and Translation at IULM University in Milan. Author of many novels, translations, and works of nonfiction, his latest book, Where I’m Reading From: The Changing World of Books, has just been published by New York Review Books.


Robert O. Paxton is Mellon Professor Emeritus of Social Science at Columbia and the author of, among other works, Vichy France and The Anatomy of Fascism.


Edmund S. Phelps is the 2006 Nobel Laureate in Economics and director of Columbia’s Center on Capitalism and Society. His most recent book is Mass Flourishing.


Ingrid D. Rowland is a professor, based in Rome, at the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture. A frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books, she is the author of The Culture of the High Renaissance: Ancients and Moderns in Sixteenth-Century Rome and The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery. She has also published a translation of Vitruvius’ Ten Books of Architecture and a history of Villa Taverna, the US ambassador’s residence in Rome. Her new book is From Pompeii: The Afterlife of a Roman Town.


James Salter, who died on June 19, was a novelist and short-story writer whose books included A Sport and a Pastime, Light Years, Dusk and Other ­Stories, and, most recently, All That Is
. (August 2015)

Amartya Sen is Thomas W. Lamont University Professor at Harvard. He received the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1998. His latest book is An Uncertain Glory: India and Its Contradictions, cowritten with Jean Drèze. (August 2015)

Charles Simic is a poet, essayist, and translator. He is the recipient of many awards, including the Pulitzer Prize, the Griffin Prize, and a MacArthur Fellowship. In 2007 Simic was appointed the fifteenth Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress. The Lunatic, his new ­volume of poetry, and The Life of Images, a book of his selected prose, were published in April.