Contents


A Tale of Woe and Glory

The Plains Indians: Artists of Earth and Sky an exhibition at the Musée du quai Branly, Paris, April 8–July 20, 2014; the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, September 19, 2014–January 11, 2015; and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, March 9–May 10, 2015

An American Hero in China

Strange Stones: Dispatches from East and West by Peter Hessler

Oracle Bones: A Journey Through Time in China by Peter Hessler

River Town: Two Years on the Yangtze by Peter Hessler

A Strangely Funny Russian Genius

“I Am a Phenomenon Quite Out of the Ordinary”: The Notebooks, Diaries, and Letters of Daniil Kharms selected, translated from the Russian, and edited by Anthony Anemone and Peter Scotto

Today I Wrote Nothing: The Selected Writings of Daniil Kharms edited and translated from the Russian by Matvei Yankelevich

The Old Woman by Daniil Kharms, adapted by Darryl Pinckney, directed by Robert Wilson

Moi Muzh Daniil Kharms [My Husband Daniil Kharms] by Marina Durnovo with Vladimir Glotser

OBERIU: An Anthology of Russian Absurdism edited by Eugene Ostashevsky, translated from the Russian by Eugene Ostashevsky and Matvei Yankelevich

An Invitation for Me to Think by Alexander Vvedensky, selected and translated from the Russian by Eugene Ostashevsky, with additional translations by Matvei Yankelevich

The Ravishing Painting of Piero di Cosimo

Piero di Cosimo: The Poetry of Painting in Renaissance Florence an exhibition at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., February 1–May 3, 2015; and the Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence, June 23–September 27, 2015

Sensual Sappho

Sappho: A New Translation of the Complete Works translated from the ancient Greek by Diane J. Rayor, with an introduction and notes by André Lardinois

How We Got to Where We Are

The Transformation of the World: A Global History of the Nineteenth Century by Jürgen Osterhammel, translated from the German by Patrick Camiller

Contributors

David Cole is the Honorable George J. Mitchell Professor in Law and Public Policy at Georgetown University Law Center. He is the author of several books, including The Torture Memos: Rationalizing the Unthinkable (2009), Less Safe, Less Free: Why America Is Losing the War on Terror (with Jules Lobel, 2007) and Enemy Aliens: Double Standards and Constitutional Freedoms in the War on Terrorism (2003).

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied. Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), The Scientist as Rebel (2006, published by New York Review Books), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). New York Review Books will publish Dreams of Earth and Sky, a new collection of Dyson’s essays, in April 2015. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Mark Ford’s Selected Poems and a volume of essays, This Dialogue of One, were published last year. He teaches in the English Department at University College London. (May 2015)

Ian Frazier is the author of ten books, including Great Plains, Family, On the Rez, and Travels in Siberia. (May 2015)

Anthony Grafton is Henry Putnam University Professor of History and the Humanities at Princeton University. His most recent book is The Culture of Correction in Renaissance Europe.


Edith Hall is a Professor in the Department of Classics and the Centre for Hellenic Studies at King’s College London.
 (May 2015)

Ian Johnson writes from Beijing and Berlin. He is writing a book on China’s beliefs and values. (May 2015)

Tim Judah is a correspondent for The Economist. For The New York Review he has reported from, among other places, Afghanistan, Serbia, Uganda, and Armenia.

Jessica Tuchman Mathews was President of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace from 1997 until this year and is now a Distinguished Fellow there. She has served in the State ­Department and on the National Security Council staff in the White House.


W.S. Merwin was born in New York City in 1927 and grew up in Union City, New Jersey, and in Scranton, Pennsylvania. From 1949 to 1951 he worked as a tutor in France, Portugal, and Majorca. He has since lived in many parts of the world, most recently on Maui in the Hawaiian Islands. He is the author of many books of poems, prose, and translations and has received both the Pulitzer and the Bollingen Prizes for poetry, among numerous other awards. His new poetry collection is The Moon Before Morning.

Jon O. Newman is a Judge of the US Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. (May 2015)

Fintan O’Toole is Literary Editor of The Irish Times and Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Prince­ton. His latest book is A History of Ireland in 100 Objects.
 (May 2015)

Thomas Powers is the author of The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA (1979), Heisenberg’s War: The Secret History of the German Bomb (1993), Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda (2002; revised and expanded edition, 2004), and The Confirmation (2000), a novel. He won a Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting in 1971 and has contributed to The New York Review of Books, The New York Times Book Review, Harper’s, The Nation, The Atlantic, and Rolling Stone. His latest book, The Killing of Crazy Horse, won the 2011 Los Angeles Times Book Prize for History. He is currently writing a memoir of his father, who once told him that the last time he met Clare Boothe Luce was in the office of Allen Dulles.


Francine Prose is a Distinguished Visiting Writer 
at Bard. Her new novel is Lovers at the Chameleon Club, Paris 1932.

Gerard Russell is the author of Heirs to Forgotten Kingdoms: Journeys into the Disappearing Religions of the Middle East. He is a Senior Fellow with the New America Foundation’s International Security Program and a Senior Associate of the Foreign Policy Centre in London.
 (May 2015)

Annie Sparrow, a medical doctor, is an Assistant Professor at the Arnhold Global Health Institute at the Icahn School of ­Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York. (May 2015)

Fritz Stern is University Professor Emeritus and the former provost of Columbia University, with which he has been associated since the 1940s. His many books include The Politics of Cultural Despair (1963), Gold and Iron: Bismarck, Bleichroder, and the Building of the German Empire (1977), Einstein’s German World (1999), and Five Germanys I Have Known (2006). And he is the author most recently of No Ordinary Men: Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Hans von Dohnanyi, Resisters Against Hitler in Church and State with Elisabeth Sifton.