How the Germans Closed Ranks Around Hitler

The German War: A Nation Under Arms, 1939–1945: Citizens and Soldiers by Nicholas Stargardt

Potsdam: The End of World War II and the Remaking of Europe by Michael Neiberg

Ministers at War: Winston Churchill and His War Cabinet by Jonathan Schneer

Why the Water Is Running Out

The Fabric of Space: Water, Modernity, and the Urban Imagination by Matthew Gandy

Water 4.0: The Past, Present, and Future of the World’s Most Vital Resource by David Sedlak

The Violent Mysteries of Indonesia

Beauty Is a Wound by Eka Kurniawan, translated from the Indonesian by Annie Tucker

The Act of Killing a film directed by Joshua Oppenheimer

The Look of Silence a film directed by Joshua Oppenheimer

The Greening Genius of Thomas Browne

Sir Thomas Browne: A Life by Reid Barbour

In Search of Sir Thomas Browne: The Life and Afterlife of the Seventeenth Century’s Most Inquiring Mind by Hugh Aldersey-Williams

Thomas Browne edited by Kevin Killeen

Religio Medici and Urne-Buriall by Sir Thomas Browne, edited and with an introduction by Stephen Greenblatt and Ramie Targoff


Julian Bell is a painter and writer. His painting sequence Genesis is published in book form this October.

 (October 2015)

John Brewer teaches in the Humanities and Social Sciences ­Division at the California Institute of Technology. He is currently working on a book on Vesuvius in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. (October 2015)

Ian Buruma is the author of The Missionary and the Libertine: Love and War in East and West (1996), Murder in Amsterdam: The Death of Theo Van Gogh and the Limits of Tolerance (2006), Year Zero: A History of 1945 (2013), and Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the Shadows of War (2014), winner of the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay. He is the Paul W. Williams Professor of Human Rights and Journalism at Bard and a regular contributor to The New York Review of Books, The New Yorker, and The New York Times, among other publications. His new book, Their ­Promised Land: My Grandparents in Love and War, will be published in January 2016.

Anita Desai is the author, most recently, of The Artist of Disappearance, a collection of three novellas. (October 2015)

Elizabeth Drew is a regular contributor to The New York ­
Review and the author, most recently, of Washington Journal: Reporting Watergate and Richard Nixon’s Downfall.
 (October 2015)

Freeman Dyson has spent most of his life as a professor of physics at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, taking time off to advise the US government and write books for the general public. He was born in England and worked as a civilian scientist for the Royal Air Force during World War II. He came to Cornell University as a graduate student in 1947 and worked with Hans Bethe and Richard Feynman, producing a user-friendly way to calculate the behavior of atoms and radiation. He also worked on nuclear reactors, solid-state physics, ferromagnetism, astrophysics, and biology, looking for problems where elegant mathematics could be usefully applied. Dyson’s books include Disturbing the Universe (1979), Weapons and Hope (1984), Infinite in All Directions (1988), Origins of Life (1986, second edition 1999), The Sun, the Genome and the Internet (1999), The Scientist as Rebel (2006, published by New York Review Books), and A Many-Colored Glass: Reflections on the Place of Life in the Universe (2010). New York Review Books will publish Dreams of Earth and Sky, a new collection of Dyson’s essays, in April 2015. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and a fellow of the Royal Society of London. In 2000 he was awarded the Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion.

Hugh Eakin is a Senior Editor at The New York Review. His reporting on the Syrian humanitarian crisis is included in Flight from Syria: Refugee Stories, published this month by the Pulitzer Center.
 (October 2015)

Norman Gall is the Executive Director of the Fernand Braudel Institute of World Economics in São Paulo. He has been engaged in research and reporting in Latin America since 1961.
 (October 2015)

Charles Glass is a former ABC News Chief Middle East Correspondent. He is the author, most recently, of Syria Burning: ISIS and the Death of the Arab Spring.
 (October 2015)

Robert Pogue Harrison is Rosina Pierotti Professor in ­Italian Literature at Stanford. His most recent book is Juvenescence: A Cultural History of Our Age.
 (October 2015)

Max Hastings is the author of many books on military history, including, most recently, Catastrophe 1914: Europe Goes to War. His new book, The Secret War, will be published next year.
 (October 2015)

Michael Hofmann is a professor in the English Department of the University of Florida. His translation of Joseph Roth’s selected journalism, The Hotel Years, is published in October 2015.

Diane Johnson is a novelist and critic. She is the author of Lulu in Marrakech 
and Le Divorce, among other novels. Her most recent book is 
Flyover Lives.

Walter Kaiser was formerly Director of Villa I Tatti, the ­Harvard Center for Italian Renaissance Studies in Florence. (October 2015)

Mark Lilla is Professor of Humanities at Columbia. His new book, The Shipwrecked Mind: Intellectuals in History, will be published in 2016.

Claire Messud is the author of four novels and a book of novellas. Her novel The Emperor’s Children was long-listed for the Man Booker Prize, and was selected as one of the ten best books of 2006 by The New York Times. Her most recent novel is The Woman Upstairs. She lives with her family in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Jonathan Mirsky is a historian of China and was formerly the East Asia Editor of The Times of London. (October 2015)

Geoffrey O’Brien is Editor in Chief of the Library of America. His ­seventh collection of poetry, In a Mist, was published in March 2015.

Fintan O’Toole is Literary Editor of The Irish Times and ­Leonard L. Milberg Visiting Lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton. His latest book is A History of Ireland in 100 Objects. (October 2015)

Nathaniel Rich is the author of Odds Against Tomorrow and 
The Mayor’s Tongue. (October 2015)

Luc Sante is the author of Low Life, Evidence, The Factory of Facts, Kill All Your Darlings, and Folk Photography. He has translated Félix Fénéon’s Novels in Three Lines and written the introduction to George Simenon’s The Man Who Watched Trains Go By (both available as NYRB Classics). He is a frequent contributor to The New York Review of Books and teaches writing and the history of photography at Bard College. His essay in the October 22, 2015 issue is drawn from his new book, The Other Paris, to be published in October by Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

A.E. Stallings is the author of three books of poetry and The ­Nature of Things, a translation of Lucretius.
 (October 2015)

Cass Sunstein is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. His new book, Constitutional Personae, is published in October. (October 2015)

Keith Thomas is a Fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. He is the author The Ends of Life: Roads to Fulfillment in Early Modern England.

Jeremy Waldron is University Professor at the NYU School of Law. His latest book is Dignity, Rank, and Rights. (October 2015)