The Good Guy

Ronan Farrow’s characters in Catch and Kill: Lies, Spies, and a Conspiracy to Protect Predators divide unmistakably into two groups. On the side of good: Farrow, his producer Rich McHugh, the accusers, miscellaneous celebrities and journalists who provided leads, everyone at The New Yorker, and two spies who came in from the cold—not to mention Farrow’s mother, his sister Dylan, and his partner Jonathan Lovett. On the side of evil is nearly everyone else. In the course of his reporting, Farrow discovers that one seemingly good person after another, along with the obvious baddies, are on Weinstein’s team in one way or another—to the point that he becomes “inured to people contorting their bodies into the shapes of gears for Harvey Weinstein’s machine.” This Manichaean scheme reflects the idea, suggested throughout the book and in its very title, that various parties engaged in a “conspiracy” to protect Weinstein and other predators. It also reflects Farrow’s presentation of himself as a singular hero.
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Table of contents

Table of contents

Table of contents

Table of contents

Table of contents