Contents


Becoming Hitler

Hitler’s Thirty Days to Power: January 1933 by Henry Ashby Turner Jr.

Nazi Germany and the Jews: Volume One: The Years of Persecution, 1933-1939 by Saul Friedländer

Confronting the Nazi Past: New Debates on Modern German History edited by Michael Burleigh

‘A More Glorious House’

The Glory of Byzantium exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, March 11-July 6, 1997

The Glory of Byzantium: Art and Culture of the Middle Byzantine Era, AD 843-1261 catalog of the exhibition edited by Helen C. Evans and William D. Wixom

Reaching the Limit

How Many People Can the Earth Support? by Joel E. Cohen

The Carrying Capacity Briefing Book by the Carrying Capacity Network

New Germany, Old NATO

Germany Unified and Europe Transformed: A Study in Statecraft by Philip Zelikow and Condoleezza Rice

American Diplomacy and the End of the Cold War: An Insider’s Account of US Policy in Europe, 1989-1992 by Robert L. Hutchings

Dissolution: The Crisis of Communism and the End of East Germany by Charles S. Maier

Problems of Democratic Transition and Consolidation: Southern Europe, South America and Post-Communist Europe by Juan J. Linz and Alfred Stepan

The Dawn of Peace in Europe by Michael Mandelbaum

Contributors

John Bayley is a critic and novelist. His books include Elegy for Iris and The Power of Delight: A Lifetime in Literature.

Peter Brown is the Philip and Beulah Rollins Professor of History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Augustine of Hippo: A Biography and, most recently, Treasure in Heaven: The Holy Poor in Early Christianity. (June 2019)

Gordon A. Craig (1913–2005) was a Scottish-American historian of Germany. He taught at both Princeton and Stanford, where he was named the J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Humanities in 1979.

Rosemary Dinnage’s books include The Ruffian on the Stair, One to One: Experiences of Psychotherapy, and Annie Besant.

Ronald Dworkin (1931–2013) was Professor of Philosophy and Frank Henry Sommer Professor of Law at NYU. His books include Is Democracy Possible Here?, Justice in Robes, Freedom’s Law, and Justice for Hedgehogs. He was the 2007 winner of the Ludvig Holberg International Memorial Prize for “his pioneering scholarly work” of “worldwide impact” and he was recently awarded the Balzan Prize for his “fundamental contributions to Jurisprudence.”


James Fenton is a British poet and literary critic. From 1994 until 1999, he was Oxford Professor of Poetry; in 2015 he was awarded the PEN Pinter Prize. He is the author of School of Genius: A History of the Royal Academy of Arts and, most recently, Yellow Tulips: Poems, 1968–2011.
 (May 2019)

Martin Gardner (1914–2010) was a science writer and novelist. He was the author of The New Ambidextrous Universe, Fractal Music, Hypercards and More, The Night is Large and Visitors from Oz.

Tony Judt (1948–2010) was the founder and director of the Remarque Institute at NYU and the author of Postwar: A History of Europe Since 1945, Ill Fares the Land, and The Burden of Responsibility: Blum, Camus, Aron, and the French Twentieth Century, among other books.

Simon Leys (1935–2014) was the pen name of Pierre Ryckmans, who was born in Belgium and settled in Australia in 1970. He taught Chinese literature at the Australian Na­tional University and was Professor of Chinese Studies at the University of Sydney from 1987 to 1993. Leys was a contributor to such publications as The New York Review of Books, Le Monde, and Le Figaro Littéraire, writing on literature and contemporary China. Among his books are Chinese Shadows, Other People’s Thoughts, and The Wreck of the Batavia & Prosper. In addition to The Death of Napoleon NYRB publishes The Hall of Uselessness, a collection of essays, and On the Abolition of All Political Parties, an essay by Simone Weil that Leys translated and edited. His many awards include the Prix Renaudot, the Prix Femina, the Prix Guizot, and the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction.

Bill McKibben is the founder of 350.org and Schumann Distinguished Scholar at Middlebury. His new book is ­Falter: Has the Human Game Played Itself Out?

 (April 2019)

Charles Rycroft (1914–1998) was a British psychoanalyst and writer. His books include A Critical Dictionary of Psychoanalysis, Anxiety and Neurosis, The Innocence of Dreams, and Psychoanalysis and Beyond.

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.