Contents


Days of Wrath

John Brown, Abolitionist: The Man Who Killed Slavery, Sparked the Civil War, and Seeded Civil Rights by David S. Reynolds

John Brown: The Legend Revisited by Merrill D. Peterson

Terrible Swift Sword: The Legacy of John Brown edited by Peggy A. Russo and Paul Finkelman

Vive la Différence!

Adam’s Curse: A Future Without Men by Bryan Sykes

Y: The Descent of Men by Steve Jones

The X in Sex: How the X Chromosome Controls Our Lives By David Bainbridge

Black Arts

Chatter: Dispatches from the Secret World of Global Eavesdropping by Patrick Radden Keefe

Blind Spot: The Secret History of American Counterterrorism by Timothy Naftali

The Reader of Gentlemen’s Mail: Herbert O. Yardley and the Birth of American Codebreaking by David Kahn

Contributors

Gabriele Annan is a book and film critic living in London. (March 2006)

Ian Buruma is the editor of The New York Review. His memoir, A Tokyo Romance, was published this year. (September 2018)

Christian Caryl is the Editor of the DemocracyPost blog at The Washington Post and the author of Strange Rebels: 1979 and the Birth of the Twenty-first Century. (November 2017)

Benjamin Demott is Mellon Professor of Humanities Emeritus at Amherst. His most recent book is Junk Politics: The Trashing of the American Mind. (May 2005)

Thomas Frank is editor of The Baffler magazine and author of One Market Under God and The Conquest of Cool. His essay in this issue is based on the afterword to the paperback edition of his most recent book, What’s the Matter with Kansas? , which will be published in May. (May 2005)

James C. Goodale, an Adjunct Professor at Fordham Law School, is the former Vice Chairman and General Counsel of The New York Times and represented the newspaper in the Pentagon Papers case. He is Host/Producer of the TV program The Digital Age. An earlier version of the article in this issue appeared in the New York Law Journal. (April 2005)

Hilary Mantel is an English novelist, short story writer, and critic. Her novel, Wolf Hall, won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

James McPherson is George Henry Davis ’86 Professor of American History Emeritus at Princeton. His books include Battle Cry of Freedom: The Civil War Era, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1989, and, most ­recently, The War That Forged a Nation: Why the Civil War Still Matters.
 (October 2016)

H. Allen Orr is University Professor and Shirley Cox Kearns Professor of Biology at the University of Rochester. He is the author, with Jerry A. Coyne, of Speciation.
 (June 2016)

Thomas Powers’s books include The Man Who Kept the Secrets: Richard Helms and the CIA and Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to al-Qaeda. (April 2018)

Ingrid D. Rowland is a Professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Rome Global Gateway. Her latest book is The Collector of Lives: Giorgio ­Vasari and the Invention of Art, cowritten with Noah Charney.
 (June 2018)

Sanford Schwartz is the author of Christen Købke and William Nicholson. (June 2018)

Charles Simic has been Poet Laureate of the United States. Come Closer and Listen, his latest book of poems, will be out next year. (August 2018)

John Updike (1932–2009) was born in Shillington, Pennsylvania. In 1954 he began to publish in The New Yorker, where he continued to contribute short stories, poems, and criticism until his death. His major work was the set of four novels chronicling the life of Harry “Rabbit” Angstrom, two of which, Rabbit is Rich and Rabbit at Rest, won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. His last books were the novel The Widows of Eastwick and Due Considerations, a collection of his essays and criticism.