Dreams of Earth and Sky cover

Dreams of Earth and Sky

In this sequel to The Scientist as Rebel (2006), Freeman Dyson—whom The Times of London calls “one of the world’s most original minds”—celebrates openness to unconventional ideas and “the spirit of joyful dreaming” in which he believes that science should be pursued. Throughout these essays, which range from the creation of the Royal Society in the seventeenth century to the scientific inquiries of the Romantic generation to recent books by Daniel Kahneman and Malcolm Gladwell, he seeks to “break down the barriers that separate science from other sources of human wisdom.”

Dyson discusses twentieth-century giants of physics such as Richard Feynman, J. Robert Oppenheimer, Paul Dirac, and Steven Weinberg, many of whom he knew personally, as well as Winston Churchill’s pursuit ...

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Featured Titles

The Death of Napoleon

Simon Leys, translated from the French by Simon Leys and Patricia Clancy
What if it was not Napoleon who had died on St. Helena in 1821—but a cunningly disguised double? “I am so glad to report that Simon Leys’s The Death of Napoleon has one hell of an idea—the absurdity of trying to retrieve time or glory—and is written with the grace of a poem.” —Edna O’Brien, The Sunday Times

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Ending Up

Kingsley Amis, introduction by Craig Brown
“I finished Kingsley Amis’s Ending Up with…a conviction, confirmed in work after work, that he is one of the few living novelists totally incapable of boring me. Ending Up is a sardonic little masterpiece which, with incredible economy and stylistic restraint, shows what old age is really like, and also—far, far better than any other writer I know—what contemporary England is like.” —Anthony Burgess

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Take a Girl Like You

Kingsley Amis’s most ambitious reckoning with his central theme—the degradation of modern life—introduces one of the rare unqualified good guys in Amis’s rogue-ridden world: Jenny Bunn, a girl from the North English country has come south to teach school in a small smug town where she hopes to find love and fortune.

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After the Tall Timber: Collected Nonfiction

As a staff writer at The New Yorker from 1963 to 2001, Renata Adler reported on civil rights from Selma; on the war in Biafra, the Six-Day War, and the Vietnam War; on the Nixon impeachment and Congress. She has also written about cultural matters, films, books, politics, and pop music. This first comprehensive gathering of her work shows why she is among the finest American journalists of the last century—and of this one.

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