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Title Author Description
book image Zama
Antonio di Benedetto
Di Benedetto
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First published in 1956, this novel set in colonial Paraguay is now universally recognized as one of the masterpieces of modern Argentinean and Spanish-language literature. “Scattered in various corners of Latin America and Spain, [Zama] had a few, fervent readers, almost all of them friends or unwarranted enemies.... [It is written with] the steady pulse of a neurosurgeon.”—Roberto Bolaño, from his story “Sensini”
Contributors: Esther Allen

book image A Memoir of the Warsaw Uprising
Memoir of the Warsaw Uprising
Miron Białoszewski
+ Description

Białoszewski, the great Polish poet, memorializes the heroic two-month uprising of the Polish population against their Nazi oppressors in 1944—an operation which saw the slaughter of 200,000 civilians. His memoir rescues a lost story of World War II even as it pays tribute to his and his comrades' vanished youths. Personal and profound, this memoir brings those harrowing days to vivid life.
Contributors: Madeline G. Levine

book image A School for Fools
School for Fools
Sasha Sokolov
+ Description

Once praised by Vladimir Nabokov as “an enchanting, tragic, and touching work,” Sasha Sokolov’s A School for Fools is a dreamlike novel of art, memory, and madness, now available in a new translation from Alexander Boguslawski.
Contributors: Alexander Boguslawski

book image Akenfield: Portrait of an English Village
Akenfield: Portrait of an English Village
Ronald Blythe
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This landmark oral history of rapidly disappearing traditional British village life reverberates with the recollections and opinions of its residents, from the schoolteacher to the blacksmith, from survivors of World War I to the newest generation of farmworkers, and everyone in between. “If you buy only one book this year, let it be this one.” —Studs Terkel
Contributors: Matt Weiland

book image The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan
Wages of Guilt
Ian Buruma
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“Mr. Buruma is a journalist who reports all sides: those of the survivors, the veterans, the politicians, the left-wing pacifists and right-wing nationalists, the judges and the judged. The Wages of Guilt is subtitled ‘Memories of War in Germany and Japan.’ But it is really far more, an exploration of the many and varied ways in which cataclysm has shaped national identity in our century.” —The New York Times

book image Chocky
John Wyndham
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“What John Wyndham does so brilliantly is invest quiet suburban streets with menace. The idea of an alien intelligence inhabiting a child is always frightening. But here Wyndham turns a story of ‘possession’ into a touching fable about our profligate use of the planet.” —The Telegraph
Contributors: Margaret Atwood

book image Henri Duchemin and His Shadows
Henri Duchemin and His Shadows
Emmanuel Bove
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A perfect introduction to Emmanuel Bove, the twentieth-century French poet of the flophouse and the dive who, as Samuel Beckett remarked, possessed an unparalleled "instinct for the essential detail." Henri Duchemin and His Shadows brims with characters who call to mind Herman Melville’s Bartleby, Robert Walser’s “little men,” and Jean Rhys’s lost women.
Contributors: Donald Breckenridge , Alyson Waters

book image Dear Illusion: Collected Stories
Dear Illusion: Collected Stories
Kingsley Amis
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Science fiction, the spy story, the ghost story—all were grist for Amis’s mill, and this original collection shows him at his adventurous best. “[Amis’s stories] are, in the most positive sense, a mixed bag. They are written by a man with plenty of interests in life, a large capacity for changing his mind and containing contrasting, even conflicting opinions within himself. The reader genuinely never knows what is coming next.”—The Spectator
Contributors: Rachel Cusk

book image The Prank: The Best of Young Chekhov
Anton Chekhov
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In 1880, the young Anton Chekhov set out to edit and publish what he considered his best work. The collection, which was to include illustrations by his brother Nikolay, was censored and never appeared as originally conceived—until now. The Prank is the first appearance of this collection in any language and includes two stories never before published in English as well as Nikolay’s drawings.
Contributors: Nikolay Chekhov , Maria Bloshteyn

book image Talk
Linda Rosenkrantz
+ Description

Rosenkrantz's groundbreaking 1968 novel set over the course of the summer spent at the beach offers all the pleasure and startling insight of eavesdropping on the witty and raw conversation between the most intimate of friends. “The pattern of self-revelation is far from coarse: it is eloquent and convincing, with its insights suddenly stumbled upon, its slender bridges of nervous sympathy that join each private island to the threatening outside world.”—The Guardian
Contributors: Stephen Koch

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