Forthcoming Books


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    The Prank: The Best of Young Chekhov

    Anton Chekhov, illustrated by Nikolay Chekhov, a new translation from the Russian by Maria Bloshteyn
    In 1880, the young Anton Chekhov set out to edit and publish what he considered his best work. The collection, which was to include illustrations by his brother Nikolay, was censored and never appeared as originally conceived—until now. The Prank is the first appearance of this collection in any language and includes two stories never before published in English as well as Nikolay’s drawings.

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    Dear Illusion: Collected Stories

    Kingsley Amis, introduction by Rachel Cusk
    Science fiction, the spy story, the ghost story—all were grist for Amis’s mill, and this original collection shows him at his adventurous best. “[Amis’s stories] are, in the most positive sense, a mixed bag. They are written by a man with plenty of interests in life, a large capacity for changing his mind and containing contrasting, even conflicting opinions within himself. The reader genuinely never knows what is coming next.”—The Spectator

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    Henri Duchemin and His Shadows

    Emmanuel Bove, introduction by Donald Breckenridge, translated from the French by Alyson Waters
    A perfect introduction to Emmanuel Bove, the twentieth-century French poet of the flophouse and the dive who, as Samuel Beckett remarked, possessed an unparalleled “instinct for the essential detail.” Henri Duchemin and His Shadows brims with characters who call to mind Herman Melville’s Bartleby, Robert Walser’s “little men,” and Jean Rhys’s lost women.

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    Chocky

    “What John Wyndham does so brilliantly is invest quiet suburban streets with menace. The idea of an alien intelligence inhabiting a child is always frightening. But here Wyndham turns a story of ‘possession’ into a touching fable about our profligate use of the planet.” —The Telegraph

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    The Wages of Guilt: Memories of War in Germany and Japan

    “Mr. Buruma is a journalist who reports all sides: those of the survivors, the veterans, the politicians, the left-wing pacifists and right-wing nationalists, the judges and the judged. The Wages of Guilt is subtitled ‘Memories of War in Germany and Japan.’ But it is really far more, an exploration of the many and varied ways in which cataclysm has shaped national identity in our century.” —The New York Times

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    The House of Twenty Thousand Books

    Journalist Sasha Abramsky chronicles the vanished intellectual world of his grandparents, Chimen and Miriam, and their vast library of socialist literature and works of Jewish history. Abramsky invites readers into his grandparents’ salon, frequented by some of the twentieth century’s greatest writers and thinkers, and tells the story of a fascinating family in an embattled era.

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    Fat City

    Leonard Gardner, introduction by Denis Johnson
    The basis of the celebrated film by John Huston, Fat City casts a compassionate eye on the rundown lives of the dreamers, drifters, and would-be contenders on the boxing circuit of Stockton, California. “[Gardner] has got it exactly right … but he has done more than just get it down, he has made it a metaphor for the joyless in heart.”—Joan Didion

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    The Little Witch

    Otfried Preussler, illustrated by Winnie Gebhardt-Gayler, translated from the German by Anthea Bell
    “Once upon a time there was a little witch who was only a hundred and twenty-seven years old.” So begins Preussler’s delightful tale of the little Witch who discovers what it means to be a good witch. “Preussler possessed an almost inexhaustible fantasy, an unfailing sense of humor and situation comedy.” —Bookbird

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    The Little Water Sprite

    Otfried Preussler, illustrated by Winnie Gebhardt-Gayler, translated from the German by Anthea Bell
    Though the little Water Sprite lives in a pond full of fishy friends, he’s ready to explore the world beyond. And what adventures await him on land! Just so long as he doesn’t let his feet get too dry as he plays with the mist fairies, slides down the mill race, and climbs to the moon.

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    The Pushcart War

    Jean Merrill, illustrated by Ronni Solbert
    Now in paperback, the 50th Anniversary Edition of a perennial classic that recounts the battle between supporters of New York City’s scrappy pushcarts and the monstrous, smoke-belching trucks that threaten to overtake its streets. “Merrill’s story, full of unexpected reversals and understated witticisms, feels exceptionally modern.”—Adam Mansbach, NPR

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    The 13 Clocks

    James Thurber, introduction by Neil Gaiman, illustrated by Marc Simont
    Now available in paperback. Satirist Thurber takes on the fairy tale and the results are captivating. “There are spys, monsters, betrayals, hair’s-breadth escapes, spells to be broken and all the usual accouterments, but Thurber gives the proceedings his own particular deadpan spin.” —The Los Angeles Times

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    Akenfield: Portrait of an English Village

    Ronald Blythe, introduction by Matt Weiland
    This landmark oral history of rapidly disappearing traditional British village life reverberates with the recollections and opinions of its residents, from the schoolteacher to the blacksmith, from survivors of World War I to the newest generation of farmworkers, and everyone in between. “If you buy only one book this year, let it be this one.” —Studs Terkel

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    Eve's Hollywood

    Eve Babitz, introduction by Holly Brubach
    The cult autobiographical novel by Eve Babitz, iconic L.A. “It Girl” of the 60s and 70s, muse and lover of artists and rock-and-roll stars and, above all, unsparing and exuberant chronicler of her native, much-loved city.

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    A Memoir of the Warsaw Uprising

    Miron Białoszewski, translated from the Polish by Madeline G. Levine
    Białoszewski, the great Polish poet, memorializes the heroic two-month uprising of the Polish population against their Nazi oppressors in 1944—an operation which saw the slaughter of 200,000 civilians. His memoir rescues a lost story of World War II even as it pays tribute to his and his comrades’ vanished youths. Personal and profound, this memoir brings those harrowing days to vivid life.

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    A School for Fools

    Sasha Sokolov, a new translation from the Russian by Alexander Boguslawski
    Once praised by Vladimir Nabokov as “an enchanting, tragic, and touching work,” Sasha Sokolov’s A School for Fools is a dreamlike novel of art, memory, and madness, now available in a new translation from Alexander Boguslawski.

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    Arthur

    Rhoda Levine, illustrated by Everett Aison
    Rhoda Levine’s delightful tale of an odd and lovable bird unlike the rest of his flock reminds us that being different can be marvelous, while Everett Aison’s whimsical illustrations of this little bird in a big city bring the story to life. All will delight in Arthur’s bird’s-eye view of New York City in the holiday season.

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    Our Spoons Came from Woolworths

    Barbara Comyns, introduction by Emily Gould
    In this autobiographical novel set in 1930s bohemian London, 21-year-old former art-student Sophia finds herself ill-equipped for wifehood or motherhood. Predictably, her marriage begins to falter; not so predictably, Sophia’s optimistic guilelessness is the very thing responsible for turning her life around.

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    The Cretan Runner

    George Psychoundakis, translated from the Greek and with an introduction by Patrick Leigh Fermor
    Psychoundakis was a twenty-one-year-old shepherd when the Nazis captured his native Crete. He soon joined the Resistance, transporting messages and goods along treacherous mountain paths, and befriending the likes of Patrick Leigh Fermor, who transled this memoir. “Any fresh volume on the subject would need to be exceptional. The Cretan Runner not only competes but transcends; it is not exceptional, it is unique.” —The Times Literary Supplement

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    Anti-Education

    Friedrich Nietzsche, introduction and annotation by Paul Reitter and Chad Wellmon, translated from the German by Damion Searls
    Anti-Education collects five brilliant and provocative lectures that Nietzsche delivered to the public in Basel in 1872. These lectures, in a clear and precise translation by Damion Searls, challenge received ideas about schooling and redefine what it means to truly learn.

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    Leon Garfield's Shakespeare Stories

    Leon Garfield, illustrated by Michael Foreman
    Award-winning children’s author Leon Garfield introduces young readers to the Shakespeare, recasting 21 plays in story form. “Narrated with vivid sense of theatrical impact … not pale reflections of the plays, but fresh creations with a life of their own.” —Stanley Wells, TLS

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    Dance to the Piper

    Agnes de Mille, introduction by Joan Acocella
    This humorous and insightful memoir by the path-breaking creator of the ballet Rodeo and choreographer of Oklahoma! and other musicals, gives readers a glimpse into the world of modern ballet—and into the life of an American legend. “One of the finest and most eloquent writers on dance the world has known” —Clive Barnes, Dance Magazine

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    Zama

    Antonio di Benedetto, translated from the Spanish and with an introduction by Esther Allen
    First published in 1956, this novel set in colonial Paraguay is now universally recognized as one of the masterpieces of modern Argentinean and Spanish-language literature. “Scattered in various corners of Latin America and Spain, [Zama] had a few, fervent readers, almost all of them friends or unwarranted enemies…. [It is written with] the steady pulse of a neurosurgeon.”—Roberto Bolaño, from his story “Sensini”

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    The Voronezh Notebooks

    Osip Mandelstam, translated from the Russian and with an introduction by Andrew Davis
    Newly rendered into English by Andrew Davis, Osip Mandelstam’s Voronezh Notebooks comprises poems written by Mandelstam during his infamous exile. In them we find unparalleled witness to one of the darkest periods in twentieth-century Russia. “Even in exile, he wrote works of untold beauty and power.” —Anna Akhmatova

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    Black Wings Has My Angel

    Elliott Chaze, introduction by Barry Gifford
    Tim Sundblade escapes from prison without much more than infallible plan for the ultimate heist. Only trouble is it’s a two-person job. So when he meets Virginia, a curiously well-spoken “ten-dollar tramp,” it seems he’s found his partner as well as his match. But there’s no telling whether this lavender-eyed angel will be Sunblade’s making or his damnation.

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    The Seven Madmen

    Roberto Arlt, translated from the Spanish by Nick Caistor
    “Arlt’s rootless protagonist is an ‘underground man’ recognizably akin to Dostoevsky’s and Kafka’s antiheroes; a romantic whose (very literal) search for his soul brings him into contact with variously anarchic ‘madmen’ (including a eunuch, an astrologer, and an unforgettably misanthropic pimp). Undoubtedly a very influential book and, in its engagingly perverse way, a kind of masterpiece.”—Kirkus Reviews

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    The Cowshed: Memories of the Chinese Cultural Revolution

    Ji Xianlin, introduction by Zha Jianying, translated from the Chinese by Chenxin Jiang
    “To a remarkable extent, The Cowshed achieved Ji’s goal of directing public attention to the brutality of the Cultural Revolution. And in light of current events such as artist Ai Weiwei’s house arrest and Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo’s imprisonment, Ji Xianlin’s eyewitness story of surviving ‘reform through labor’ is an especially timely read.” —Jiang Chenxin

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    Mirage

    translated from the Chinese by Patrick Hanan
    Erotic, violent, and intelligently rendered, Mirage is one of the earliest Chinese works detailing the rise of the opium trade in China.

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    Existential Monday: Essays

    Benjamin Fondane, translated from the French by Andrew Rubens and Bruce Baugh
    Fondane was a French-Romanian intellectual and poet whose thought and writing transcended the boundaries of genre and discipline, spanning poetry, theater, literary criticism, and philosophy. This is the first selection of Fondane’s philosophical works to appear in English, revealing him to be one of the great French philosophers of the 20th century.

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    The Book of Blam

    Aleksandar Tišma, translated from the Serbian by Michael Henry Heim
    Against all odds, Miroslav Blam, a Serbian Jew, has survived not only WWII but the terrible civilian massacre of 1942. Wandering the streets of Novi Sad, he recalls his youth looks to the future. “This could be Svevo’s Trieste, or a provincial town in a Chekhov story. Miroslav is that familiar creation of the great middle European writers, the city intellectual whose whole bourgeois existence is devoted to making up his mind.”—Publishers Weekly

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    Cinepoems and Others

    Benjamin Fondane, edited and translated from the French by Leonard Schwartz
    French-Romanian poet and intellectual Benjamin Fondane defied definition, spurned borders geographic and generic, and wrote some of the most beautiful verse of his generation. This is the first book-length collection of Fondane’s poetry to appear in English.

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    My Marriage

    Jakob Wassermann, translated from the German by Michael Hofmann
    Posthumously published in 1934 and based on Jakob Wassermann’s own ruinous marriage, My Marriage is a tragic masterpiece that unfolds in shocking detail. “The candour and extremity and intelligence of My First Wife are profoundly affecting…This is a literary masterwork of a vanished kind, but through the remarkable Hofmann it is born again as a story for our age.”—Rachel Cusk

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    Primitive Man as Philosopher

    Paul Radin, introduction by Neni Panourgiá
    Considered “a minor masterpiece of the Americanist tradition,” Paul Radin’s landmark anthropological study examines thought and religion in an array of aboriginal cultures through first hand accounts and a veritable anthology of poems and songs from the varied traditions. Readers both in and outside of the field will appreciate the rich and varied insights of this classic of anthropology.

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