Forthcoming Books


  • book image

    The Three Leaps of Wang Lun: A Chinese Novel

    Alfred Döblin, translated from the German by C.D. Godwin
    Alfred Döblin’s debut work of fiction, the first in western literature to depict Chinese history in great detail and considered by many the first modern German novel, is a dazzling expressionist epic about imperial court life, outcasts, martial arts, religion, and revolution. “I consider Döblin’s 1915 novel, The Three Leaps of Wang Lun, the best contemporary novel by far. It exhibits an entirely superior, most rare, talent. It is true art.” —Max Horkheimer

    More »

  • book image

    Chinese Rhyme-Prose

    preface by Lucas Klein, translated from the Chinese by Burton Watson
    Burton Watson’s monumental compilation of fu—or, rhyme-prose poetry—is considered one of the most important anthologies of Chinese literature available in English and, until now, has been out of print for decades. The poems, full of abandoned cities, mountainscapes, owls and goddesses, are rendered here in Watson’s masterful English translation for a new generation of readers to enjoy.

    More »

  • book image

    The Literary Mind and the Carving of Dragons

    Liu Hsieh, translated from the Chinese and annotated by Vincent Yu-chung Shih
    The first comprehensive work of literary criticism in Chinese, The Literary Mind and the Carving of Dragons was written some 1,500 years ago by critic Liu Hsieh whose encyclopedic knowledge of Chinese literature is organized here according to the I Ching. A dazzling, elegant compendium of literary concepts both alien and familiar, Hsieh’s book is indispensable for anyone interested in Chinese literature or in the art of writing itself.

    More »

  • book image

    Patrick Leigh Fermor : An Adventure

    Now in paperback, Artemis Cooper’s prize-winning biography draws from years of conversations with Patrick Leigh Fermor and his closest friends as well as Leigh Fermor’s own private papers, to which Cooper had unlimited access.

    More »

  • book image

    Thus Were Their Faces: Selected Stories

    Silvina Ocampo, introduction by Helen Oyeyemi, a new translation from the Spanish by Daniel Balderston, preface by Jorge Luis Borges
    Dark, gothic, fantastic, and grotesque, Ocampo’s stories stand alongside those of her collaborators and countrymen Borges, Cortázar, and Bioy Casares. “Few writers have an eye for the small horrors of everyday life; fewer still see the everyday marvelous. Other than Ocampo, I cannot think of a single writer who … has chronicled both with such wise and elegant humor.” —Alberto Manguel

    More »

  • book image

    The Door

    Magda Szabó, introduction by Ali Smith, a new translation from the Hungarian by Len Rix
    In a prizewinning translation by Len Rix, Magda Szabó’s unsettling and beautiful novel about friendship and tragedy marks Szabó as a major modern European author and formidable writer of female characters. “Clever, moving, frightening, [The Door] deserves to be a bestseller.” —The Telegraph

    More »

  • book image

    Silvina Ocampo

    Silvina Ocampo, a new translation from the Spanish by Jason Weiss
    Ocampo studied with de Chirico and collaborated with Borges and Bioy Casares. Her poems were celebrated in Argentina but, until now, have been nearly unavailable in English. This selection spans her full career—from early nature sonnets to a late metaphysical turn—and shows her to be adept at “captur[ing] the magic inside everyday rituals” (Italo Calvino).

    More »

  • book image

    Ending Up

    Kingsley Amis, introduction by Craig Brown
    “I finished Kingsley Amis’s Ending Up with…a conviction, confirmed in work after work, that he is one of the few living novelists totally incapable of boring me. Ending Up is a sardonic little masterpiece which, with incredible economy and stylistic restraint, shows what old age is really like, and also—far, far better than any other writer I know—what contemporary England is like.” —Anthony Burgess

    More »

  • book image

    Take a Girl Like You

    Kingsley Amis’s most ambitious reckoning with his central theme—the degradation of modern life—Take a Girl Like You introduces one of the rare unqualified good guys in Amis’s rogue-ridden world: Jenny Bunn, a girl from the North English country has come south to teach school in a small smug town where she hopes to find love and fortune.

    More »

  • book image

    A Legacy

    An unforgettable tale, set in Germany before the First World War, of two very different families—one Jewish, from Berlin’s upper bourgeoisie, the other landed Catholic aristocracy—whose fortunes will be strangely, and sometimes fatally, entwined. “One of the very best novels I have ever read.” —Nancy Mitford

    More »

  • book image

    The Elephant Who Liked to Smash Small Cars

    Jean Merrill, illustrated by Ronni Solbert
    What is your favorite thing to do in the whole world? Whatever it is, odds are that you don’t like doing it as much as the elephant who likes to smash small cars loves smashing cars. Jean Merrill’s story of gleeful destruction, revenge, and conciliation is accompanied by Ronni Solbert’s colorful crayon drawings. Rarely has property damage looked so adorable.

    More »

  • book image

    Go Figure! New Perspectives on Guston

    edited and with an introduction by Peter Benson Miller, preface by Robert Storr
    Go Figure!, a lavishly illustrated volume of essays about Philip Guston (1913-1980), considers the late work of Guston who was a friend and contemporary of Jackson Pollock and Willem de Kooning. This volume illustrates the enduring power of his work, particularly the fireworks generated by expressive contradictions embodied in his last paintings.

    More »

  • book image

    Primitive Man as Philosopher

    Paul Radin, introduction by Neni Panourgiá
    Considered “a minor masterpiece of the Americanist tradition,” Paul Radin’s landmark anthropological study examines thought and religion in an array of aboriginal cultures through first hand accounts and a veritable anthology of poems and songs from the varied traditions. Readers both in and outside of the field will appreciate the rich and varied insights of this classic of anthropology.

    More »

  • book image

    Onward and Upward in the Garden

    Katharine White, edited and with an introduction by E.B. White
    This collection of White’s gardening columns, originally written for The New Yorker, has blossomed into a classic in its own right. Here is White’s acerbic and irreverent take on everything from the unsung authors of seed packet copy to flower arranging, herbalists, and the pleasures of dreaming of future gardens. “Can be savored by the reader whose closest acquaintance with nature is the corner florist. It is a heady compost of observation, taste, wit, and scholarship.”—Time

    More »

  • book image

    Prometheus Bound

    Aeschylus, translated and with an introduction by Joel Agee
    Perhaps the starkest and strangest of the Greek tragedies, Prometheus Bound is also one of the great poetic achievements of the ancient world. Joel Agee’s powerful new translation reveals the fierce and glorious music of the original verse.

    More »

  • book image

    After the Tall Timber: Collected Nonfiction

    As a staff writer at The New Yorker from 1963 to 2001, Renata Adler reported on civil rights from Selma; on the war in Biafra, the Six-Day War, and the Vietnam War; on the Nixon impeachment and Congress. She has also written about cultural matters, films, books, politics, and pop music. This first comprehensive gathering of her work shows why she is among the finest American journalists of the last century—and of this one.

    More »

  • book image

    Drum-Taps: The Complete 1865 Edition

    Walt Whitman, edited and with an introduction by Lawrence Kramer
    Whitman wrote the poems that make up Drum-Taps in reaction to the suffering “soldier boys” he witnessed in Civil War field hospitals. It was immediately published as a single volume after the end of the war. Later, the poems that make it up were reordered and incorporated into Leaves of Grass. This volume is the first in 150 years to present this work in the form originally intended by its author, revealing the full force of these powerful and profoundly moving poems.

    More »

  • book image

    The Peach Blossom Fan

    K’ung Shang-jen, introduction by Jonathan D. Spence, translated from the Chinese by Chen Shih-hsiang and Harold Acton, with the collaboration of Cyril Birch
    A grand historical drama about the collapse of the Ming Dynasty, The Peach Blossom Fan, written in 1699, was massively popular in its time and remains one of the most pervasively adapted works in all of Chinese literature. ”Replete with romance, conflicts between loyalty and treachery, a healthy measure of bawdy humor, punning, elegant poetry, moral issues, and popular philosophical currents”—Howard Goldblatt

    More »

  • book image

    Alive: New and Selected Poems

    This collection of new and selected poetry from Elizabeth Willis is a perfect primer on the work of one of America’s most important and talented contemporary poets. “Willis has the finest ear for the lyric amongst her generation…. The intense beauty of the work is an unblinking testament to the poet’s sense that the stakes for language are becoming impossibly high.” —Richard Deming, Boston Review

    More »

  • book image

    Dreams of Earth and Sky

    Dyson’s new collection includes reminiscences, lucid explanations of scientific concepts, and an engagingly imaginative approach to the triumphs, blunders, mysteries, and dreams of scientific inquiry into the natural world.

    More »

  • book image

    Naked Earth

    Part love story, part political drama, Eileen Chang’s novel about war and its ravages in midcentury China is a stunning, tragic work. A young man and a young woman are sent to help peasants on a collective farm. Despite their troubled pasts, a romance blossoms. But spies abound, and their love is threatened—perhaps irrevocably. “Eileen Chang is the fallen angel of Chinese literature.”—Ang Lee

    More »

  • book image

    The Death of Napoleon

    Simon Leys, translated from the French by Patricia Clancy
    What if it was not Napoleon who had died on St. Helena in 1821—but a cunningly disguised double? “I am so glad to report that Simon Leys’s The Death of Napoleon has one hell of an idea—the absurdity of trying to retrieve time or glory—and is written with the grace of a poem.” —Edna O’Brien, The Sunday Times

    More »

  • book image

    Mio, My Son

    Astrid Lindgren, illustrated by Ilon Wikland
    The enchanted and enchanting tale of Karl Anders Nilsson, a young foster child who yearns for a loving home and for his real parents, until he finds a genie in a bottle who, once released, brings Karl to his father, the King of Farawayland.

    More »

  • book image

    Seacrow Island

    English speakers know Astrid Lindgren as the author of Pippi Longstocking, but in her native Sweden, she is equally beloved for this story of the Melkerson children’s summer of adventure, love, and a very special Saint Bernard.

    More »

  • book image

    A School for Fools

    Sasha Sokolov, a new translation from the Russian by Alexander Boguslawski
    Once praised by Vladimir Nabokov as “an enchanting, tragic, and touching work,” Sasha Sokolov’s A School for Fools is a dreamlike novel of art, memory, and madness, now available in a new translation from Alexander Boguslawski.

    More »

  • book image

    The Prank: The Best of Young Chekhov

    Anton Chekhov, illustrated by Nikolay Chekhov, a new translation from the Russian by Maria Bloshteyn
    In 1880, the young Anton Chekhov set out to edit and publish what he considered his best work. The collection, which was to include illustrations by his brother Nikolay, was censored and never appeared as originally conceived—until now. The Prank is the first appearance of this collection in any language and includes two stories never before published in English as well as Nikolay’s drawings.

    More »

  • book image

    A View of the Harbour

    An unsparing look at a seedy seaside town and the sexual and emotional tensions that preoccupy its inhabitants. Beautifully observed, Taylor’s novel examines the lies and truths around which we build our lives. “Jane Austen, Elizabeth Taylor, Barbara Pym, Elizabeth Bowen—soul sisters all.” —Anne Tyler

    More »

  • book image

    The Prince of Minor Writers: The Selected Essays of Max Beerbohm

    Max Beerbohm, edited and with an introduction by Phillip Lopate
    In his day, Max Beerbohm was recognized as an incomparable observer of modern life and an essayist whose voice was always and only his own. Today, as the editor of this volume, Phillip Lopate has remarked, “it becomes all the more necessary to ponder how Beerbohm performed the delicate operation of displaying so much personality without lapsing into sticky confession.” Among the topics addressed are the vogue for Russian writers, laughter and philosophy, dandies, and George Bernard Shaw.

    More »

  • book image

    Talk

    Rosenkrantz’s groundbreaking 1968 novel set over the course of the summer spent at the beach offers all the pleasure and startling insight of eavesdropping on the witty and raw conversation between the most intimate of friends. “The pattern of self-revelation is far from coarse: it is eloquent and convincing, with its insights suddenly stumbled upon, its slender bridges of nervous sympathy that join each private island to the threatening outside world.”—The Guardian

    More »

  • book image

    A Family Lexicon

    Natalia Ginzburg, introduction by Peg Boyers, translated from the Italian by Jenny McPhee
    “The places, events and people are all real. I have invented nothing,” wrote Natalia Ginzburg of her novel A Family Lexicon, which reconstructs the life of an Italian family from the rise of Mussolini through World War II and its aftermath. “Ginzburg’s voice is at once clear and shaded, artless and sly, able to speak of the deepest sorrows and smallest pleasures of everyday life.”—Phillip Lopate

    More »

  • book image

    Akenfield: Portrait of an English Village

    Ronald Blythe, introduction by Matt Weiland
    This landmark oral history of rapidly disappearing traditional British village life reverberates with the recollections and opinions of its residents, from the schoolteacher to the blacksmith, from survivors of World War I to the newest generation of farmworkers, and everyone in between. “If you buy only one book this year, let it be this one.” —Studs Terkel

    More »

  • book image

    Dear Illusion: Selected Stories

    Science fiction, the spy story, the ghost story were all grist for Amis’s mill, and this original collection shows him at his adventurous best. “[Amis’s stories] are, in the most positive sense, a mixed bag. They are written by a man with plenty of interests in life, a large capacity for changing his mind and containing contrasting, even conflicting opinions within himself. The reader genuinely never knows what is coming next.”—The Spectator

    More »

  • book image

    Álvaro Mutis: Selected Poems

    Álvaro Mutis, new translations from the Spanish by Edith Grossman and Alastair Reid
    Álvaro Mutis is indisputably one of the greatest Latin American writers of the 20th century, best known for creating Maqroll the Gaviero, a character forever searching for love and riches that he knows are ephemeral. Until now English-language readers enraptured by Maqroll have been unable to sample the poems in which he first appeared. This volume brings together for the first time in English, a selection Mutis’s surrealist-tinged, yet utterly sui generis poetical works.

    More »

  • book image

    Henri Duchemin and His Shadows

    Emmanuel Bove, introduction by Donald Breckenridge, translated from the French by Alyson Waters
    A perfect introduction to Emmanuel Bove, the twentieth-century French poet of the flophouse and the dive who, as Samuel Beckett remarked, possessed an unparalleled “instinct for the essential detail.” Henri Duchemin and His Shadows brims with characters who call to mind Herman Melville’s Bartleby, Robert Walser’s “little men,” and Jean Rhys’s lost women.

    More »

  • book image

    Chocky

    John Wyndham, introduction by Margaret Atwood
    “What John Wyndham does so brilliantly is invest quiet suburban streets with menace. The idea of an alien intelligence inhabiting a child is always frightening. But here Wyndham turns a story of ‘possession’ into a touching fable about our profligate use of the planet.” —The Telegraph

    More »

  • book image

    The Wages of Guilt

    “Mr. Buruma is a journalist who reports all sides: those of the survivors, the veterans, the politicians, the left-wing pacifists and right-wing nationalists, the judges and the judged. The Wages of Guilt is subtitled ‘Memories of War in Germany and Japan.’ But it is really far more, an exploration of the many and varied ways in which cataclysm has shaped national identity in our century.” —The New York Times

    More »

  • book image

    Zama

    Antonio di Benedetto, translated from the Spanish and with an introduction by Esther Allen
    First published in 1956, this novel set in colonial Paraguay is now universally recognized as one of the masterpieces of modern Argentinean and Spanish-language literature. “Scattered in various corners of Latin America and Spain, [Zama] had a few, fervent readers, almost all of them friends or unwarranted enemies…. [It is written with] the steady pulse of a neurosurgeon.”—Roberto Bolaño, from his story “Sensini”

    More »