Forthcoming Books


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    Mio, My Son

    Astrid Lindgren, illustrated by Ilon Wikland
    The enchanted and enchanting tale of Karl Anders Nilsson, a young foster child who yearns for a loving home and for his real parents, until he finds a genie in a bottle who, once released, brings Karl to his father, the King of Farawayland.

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    Seacrow Island

    English speakers know Astrid Lindgren as the author of Pippi Longstocking, but in her native Sweden, she is equally beloved for this story of the Melkerson children’s summer of adventure, love, and a very special Saint Bernard.

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    A View of the Harbour

    An unsparing look at a seedy seaside town and the sexual and emotional tensions that preoccupy its inhabitants. Beautifully observed, Taylor’s novel examines the lies and truths around which we build our lives. “Jane Austen, Elizabeth Taylor, Barbara Pym, Elizabeth Bowen—soul sisters all.” —Anne Tyler

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    The Prince of Minor Writers: The Selected Essays of Max Beerbohm

    Max Beerbohm, edited and with an introduction by Phillip Lopate
    In his day, Max Beerbohm was recognized as an incomparable observer of modern life and an essayist whose voice was always and only his own. Today, as the editor of this volume, Phillip Lopate has remarked, “it becomes all the more necessary to ponder how Beerbohm performed the delicate operation of displaying so much personality without lapsing into sticky confession.” Among the topics addressed are the vogue for Russian writers, laughter and philosophy, dandies, and George Bernard Shaw.

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    The Peach Blossom Fan

    K’ung Shang-jen, introduction by Judith T. Zeitlin, translated from the Chinese by Chen Shih-hsiang and Harold Acton, with the collaboration of Cyril Birch
    A grand historical drama about the collapse of the Ming Dynasty, The Peach Blossom Fan, written in 1699, was massively popular in its time and remains one of the most pervasively adapted works in all of Chinese literature. ”Replete with romance, conflicts between loyalty and treachery, a healthy measure of bawdy humor, punning, elegant poetry, moral issues, and popular philosophical currents”—Howard Goldblatt

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    Naked Earth

    Eileen Chang, introduction by Perry Link
    Part love story, part political drama, Eileen Chang’s novel about war and its ravages in midcentury China is a stunning, tragic work. A young man and a young woman are sent to help peasants on a collective farm. Despite their troubled pasts, a romance blossoms. But spies abound, and their love is threatened—perhaps irrevocably. “Eileen Chang is the fallen angel of Chinese literature.”—Ang Lee

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    Primitive Man as Philosopher

    Paul Radin, introduction by Neni Panourgiá
    Considered “a minor masterpiece of the Americanist tradition,” Paul Radin’s landmark anthropological study examines thought and religion in an array of aboriginal cultures through first hand accounts and a veritable anthology of poems and songs from the varied traditions. Readers both in and outside of the field will appreciate the rich and varied insights of this classic of anthropology.

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    Talk

    Linda Rosenkrantz, introduction by Stephen Koch
    Rosenkrantz’s groundbreaking 1968 novel set over the course of the summer spent at the beach offers all the pleasure and startling insight of eavesdropping on the witty and raw conversation between the most intimate of friends. “The pattern of self-revelation is far from coarse: it is eloquent and convincing, with its insights suddenly stumbled upon, its slender bridges of nervous sympathy that join each private island to the threatening outside world.”—The Guardian

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    A School for Fools

    Sasha Sokolov, a new translation from the Russian by Alexander Boguslawski
    Once praised by Vladimir Nabokov as “an enchanting, tragic, and touching work,” Sasha Sokolov’s A School for Fools is a dreamlike novel of art, memory, and madness, now available in a new translation from Alexander Boguslawski.

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    The Prank: The Best of Young Chekhov

    Anton Chekhov, illustrated by Nikolay Chekhov, a new translation from the Russian by Maria Bloshteyn
    In 1880, the young Anton Chekhov set out to edit and publish what he considered his best work. The collection, which was to include illustrations by his brother Nikolay, was censored and never appeared as originally conceived—until now. The Prank is the first appearance of this collection in any language and includes two stories never before published in English as well as Nikolay’s drawings.

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    Akenfield: Portrait of an English Village

    Ronald Blythe, introduction by Matt Weiland
    This landmark oral history of rapidly disappearing traditional British village life reverberates with the recollections and opinions of its residents, from the schoolteacher to the blacksmith, from survivors of World War I to the newest generation of farmworkers, and everyone in between. “If you buy only one book this year, let it be this one.” —Studs Terkel

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    Henri Duchemin and His Shadows

    Emmanuel Bove, introduction by Donald Breckenridge, translated from the French by Alyson Waters
    A perfect introduction to Emmanuel Bove, the twentieth-century French poet of the flophouse and the dive who, as Samuel Beckett remarked, possessed an unparalleled “instinct for the essential detail.” Henri Duchemin and His Shadows brims with characters who call to mind Herman Melville’s Bartleby, Robert Walser’s “little men,” and Jean Rhys’s lost women.

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    Chocky

    John Wyndham, introduction by Margaret Atwood
    “What John Wyndham does so brilliantly is invest quiet suburban streets with menace. The idea of an alien intelligence inhabiting a child is always frightening. But here Wyndham turns a story of ‘possession’ into a touching fable about our profligate use of the planet.” —The Telegraph

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    The Wages of Guilt

    “Mr. Buruma is a journalist who reports all sides: those of the survivors, the veterans, the politicians, the left-wing pacifists and right-wing nationalists, the judges and the judged. The Wages of Guilt is subtitled ‘Memories of War in Germany and Japan.’ But it is really far more, an exploration of the many and varied ways in which cataclysm has shaped national identity in our century.” —The New York Times

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    The House of Twenty Thousand Books

    Journalist Sasha Abramsky chronicles the vanished intellectual world of his grandparents, Chimen and Miriam, and their vast library of socialist literature and works of Jewish history. Abramsky invites readers into his grandparents’ salon, frequented by some of the twentieth century’s greatest writers and thinkers, and tells the story of a fascinating family in an embattled era.

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    A Memoir of the Warsaw Uprising

    Miron Białoszewski, translated from the Polish by Madeline G. Levine
    Białoszewski, the great Polish poet, memorializes the heroic two-month uprising of the Polish population against their Nazi oppressors in 1944—an operation which saw the slaughter of 200,000 civilians. His memoir rescues a lost story of World War II even as it pays tribute to his and his comrades’ vanished youths. Personal and profound, this memoir brings those harrowing days to vivid life.

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    Zama

    Antonio di Benedetto, translated from the Spanish and with an introduction by Esther Allen
    First published in 1956, this novel set in colonial Paraguay is now universally recognized as one of the masterpieces of modern Argentinean and Spanish-language literature. “Scattered in various corners of Latin America and Spain, [Zama] had a few, fervent readers, almost all of them friends or unwarranted enemies…. [It is written with] the steady pulse of a neurosurgeon.”—Roberto Bolaño, from his story “Sensini”

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    Eve's Hollywood

    The cult autobiographical novel by Eve Babitz, iconic L.A. “It Girl” of the 60s and 70s, muse and lover of artists and rock-and-roll stars and, above all, unsparing and exuberant chronicler of her native, much-loved city.

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    Fat City

    The basis of the celebrated film by John Huston, Fat City casts a compassionate eye on the rundown lives of the dreamers, drifters, and would-be contenders on the boxing circuit of Stockton, California. “[Gardner] has got it exactly right … but he has done more than just get it down, he has made it a metaphor for the joyless in heart.”—Joan Didion

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    The Little Witch

    Otfried Preussler, illustrated by Winnie Gebhardt-Gayler, translated from the German by Anthea Bell
    “Once upon a time there was a little witch who was only a hundred and twenty-seven years old.” So begins Preussler’s delightful tale of the little Witch who discovers what it means to be a good witch. “Preussler possessed an almost inexhaustible fantasy, an unfailing sense of humor and situation comedy.” —Bookbird

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    The Little Water Sprite

    Otfried Preussler, illustrated by Winnie Gebhardt-Gayler, translated from the German by Anthea Bell
    Though the little Water Sprite lives in a pond full of fishy friends, he’s ready to explore the world beyond. And what adventures await him on land! Just so long as he doesn’t let his feet get too dry as he plays with the mist fairies, slides down the mill race, and climbs to the moon.

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    Anti-Education

    Friedrich Nietzsche, introduction and annotation by Paul Reitter and Chad Wellmon, translated from the German by Damion Searls
    Anti-Education collects five brilliant and provocative lectures that Nietzsche delivered to the public in Basel in 1872. These lectures, in a clear and precise translation by Damion Searls, challenge received ideas about schooling and redefine what it means to truly learn.

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    The Cretan Runner

    George Psychoundakis, translated from the Greek and with an introduction by Patrick Leigh Fermor
    Psychoundakis was a twenty-one-year-old shepherd when the Nazis captured his native Crete. He soon joined the Resistance, transporting messages and goods along treacherous mountain paths, and befriending the likes of Patrick Leigh Fermor, who transled this memoir. “Any fresh volume on the subject would need to be exceptional. The Cretan Runner not only competes but transcends; it is not exceptional, it is unique.” —The Times Literary Supplement

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