Forthcoming Books


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    The Captain's Daughter

    Alexander Pushkin, introduction by Robert Chandler, translated from the Russian by Robert Chandler and Elizabeth Chandler
    At once a fairy tale and a thrilling historical novel of rebellion and romance, this singularly Russian work of the imagination is also a timeless, universal, and very winning story of how love and duty can summon pluck and luck to confront calamity. “The Captain’s Daughter is one of the stories in which Pushkin created Russian prose…. It is true poet’s prose, absolutely clear, objective, unpretentious and penetrating.”—Robert Conquest, The Spectator

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    Conversations with Beethoven

    Sanford Friedman, introduction by Richard Howard
    Deaf but still able to converse, Beethoven “heard” those around him by means of conversation books in which friends and family jotted down communications. This daring novel, featuring a Dickensian cast, is a fictional reconstruction of these books. In it we see the ageing composer struggling with his art, fighting illness, and perpetually worried about the fate of his wayward ward and nephew, Karl.

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    Totempole

    Friedman’s psychologically acute and empathetic masterpiece traces the coming-of-age—from two to twenty two—of a boy growing up on the Lower East Side of New York. “Vivid and utterly convincing…The truth of Mr. Friedman’s book is not the truth of autobiography, but the truth-making that the best fiction is.”—James Dickey

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    Theater of Cruelty: Art, Film, and the Shadows of War

    Many of the filmmakers and artists Ian Buruma covers in his new collection, which focuses on the themes of war, film, and the visual arts, come from Germany and Japan and deal with World War II. What unifies the book is less the question of war itself than the way people deal with violence and cruelty, in the arts and in life.

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    The Pushcart War

    Jean Merrill, illustrated by Ronni Solbert
    The 50th Anniversary Edition of a perennial classic that recounts the battle between supporters of New York City’s scrappy pushcarts and the monstrous, smoke-belching trucks that threaten to overtake its streets. “Merrill’s story, full of unexpected reversals and understated witticisms, feels exceptionally modern.”—Adam Mansbach, NPR

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    Krabat and the Sorcerer's Mill

    Otfried Preussler, translated from the German by Anthea Bell
    Krabat, a 12-year-old beggar boy, is summoned in a dream to a mysterious mill where he finds himself in the company of eleven other boys, all apprenticed to a sinister Master who will teach them the finer points of black magic—whether they want to learn them or not. Preussler’s incantatory story of the power of friendship to challenge evil has been casting a spell on readers of all ages since first published in 1971.

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    The Use of Man

    Aleksandar Tišma, introduction by Claire Messud, translated from the Serbo-Croatian by Bernard Johnson
    A powerful work that tracks the intertwined lives of a group of high-school classmates in Yugoslavia during WWII: Jew, Nazi, resistance fighter, and cold-blooded killer. “Its power is on a scale normally associated with our favorite (dead) authors…. The world will not look quite the same after you’ve read this book.
    Toronto Star

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    Blackballed: The Black Vote and US Democracy

    Darryl Pinckney’s first book in over ten years covers the participation of blacks in US electoral politics, from Reconstruction to the Supreme Court’s recent decision striking down part of the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and what it may mean for the political influence of black voters in future elections.

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    On the Abolition of All Political Parties

    Simone Weil, a new translation from the French and with an introduction by Simon Leys, with a biographical essay by Czeslaw Milosz
    In this famous essay, now widely available for the first time in English translation, Weil challenges the foundation of the modern liberal political order and proposes that politics can only begin where the party spirit comes to an end. The volume also includes a portrait of Weil by the Nobel laureate Czeslaw Milosz and an essay about Weil’s friendship with Albert Camus by Simon Leys.

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    Journey by Moonlight

    Antal Szerb, introduction by Julie Orringer, a new translation from the Hungarian by Len Rix
    “A devastatingly intelligent novel of love, society and metaphysics in a mid-1930s Europe…As a study of erotic caprice, Journey by Moonlight is brilliant, but it is so much more than just a romp…This is a delightfully clever and enchanting novel, always entertaining and full of memorable aphorisms.”—Toby Lichtig, The Times Literary Supplement

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    In the Heart of the Heart of the Country

    William H. Gass, introduction by Joanna Scott
    This collection defines Gass not as a special but as a major voice … Gass engenders brand-new abrupt vulnerabilities. We read about the becalmed Midwest, about farmers mired in their dailiness, and realize too late that we’ve been exposed to a deadly poetry. It says that America is lost … No writer I’ve ever read, not even Joyce, can celebrate his world with a more piercing sadness.”—Frederic Morton, The New York Times

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    Alphabetabum: An Album of Rare Photographs and Medium Verses

    A picture album. An alphabet book. An Alphabetabum! Here artist and designer Radunsky (illustrator of Advice to Little Girls by Mark Twain) allows us a special viewing of his own personal collection of portraits of girls and boys from the last century. And his friend Chris Raschka (A Ball for Daisy) contributes a delightful poem imagining the life and personality of each child.

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    The Woman Who Borrowed Memories: Selected Stories of Tove Jansson

    Tove Jansson, introduction by Lauren Groff, new translations from the Swedish by Thomas Teal and Silvester Mazzarella
    Tove Jansson’s natural mode was the brief tale—whether in her comic strips or Moomin stories, or in her moving compilation of moments from family life on a remote island, The Summer Book. This first, career-spanning collection of her short stories returns to the settings of Jansson’s familiar work and also delves deeper into themes of travel, artistic creation, and the conundrum of living among humans as flawed as oneself.

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    Tristana

    Benito Pérez Galdós, introduction by Jeremy Treglown, a new translation from the Spanish by Margaret Jull Costa
    Until now Pérez Galdós’s tale of a beautiful and brilliant young woman’s attempt to free herself from an imprisoning relationship to a womanizing older man has been recognized more as the inspiration for a Buñuel film of the same name than as a masterpiece in its own right. Margaret Jull Costa’s new and fluid translation brings the Spanish realist’s story to glorious life.

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    The Land Breakers

    John Ehle, introduction by Linda Spalding
    A historical saga that chronicles Appalachian settlement during the Revolutionary War years. “Reads like living history … I could recommend this book simply for Ehle’s vivid portrayal of the purely practical struggle of pioneering life … but it’s also a riveting story, with scenes that will remain alive for me for a long time.”—Lori Benton

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    Cat Town: Selected Poems

    Sakutarō Hagiwara, translated from the Japanese by Hiroaki Sato
    Sakutarō Hagiwara is the ultimate modern Japanese poet. He first perfected the use of the colloquial language as a medium for modern poetic expression. Using that language, he reveals a sensibility that can be tough, neurotic, ironic, touching, and profound, sometimes all in the same poem. Always rhythmic and occasionally obscure, poem after poem can represent a scintillating verbal and spiritual adventure, particularly in the lucid and elegant translations created by Hiroaki Sato.”—J. Thomas Rimer

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    The Complete Bostock and Harris

    The Complete Bostock and Harris combines two delightful, suspenseful, and madly funny tales of Harris and the not-so-bright Bostock, a rollicking best-friend duo who’ve been through thick and thin together in eighteenth-century Brighton. “A delicious literary concoction bubbling along with the author’s perfect sense of dramatic timing and with his mixture of earthy humor and effervescent wit.”—The Horn Book Magazine

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    Midnight in the Century

    Victor Serge, translated from the French and with an introduction by Richard Greeman
    A searching novel about a group of revolutionaries—true believers in a cause that no longer exists—living in unlikely exile among Russian Orthodox Old Believers, also suffering for their faith. “Like Koestler in ‘Darkness at Noon,’ Serge seems to be saying that man, the particular, is more important than mankind, the abstraction.”—John Leonard, The New York Times

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    Zama

    Antonio di Benedetto, translated from the Spanish and with an introduction by Esther Allen
    First published in 1956, this novel set in colonial Paraguay is now universally recognized as one of the masterpieces of modern Argentinean and Spanish-language literature. “Scattered in various corners of Latin America and Spain, [Zama] had a few, fervent readers, almost all of them friends or unwarranted enemies…. [It is written with] the steady pulse of a neurosurgeon.”—Roberto Bolaño, from his story “Sensini”

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    Lives of the New York Intellectuals: A Group Portrait

    One of contemporary America’s leading critics and scholars offers a provocative reassessment of the lives and work of eight influential twentieth-century American writers: Lionel Trilling, Dwight Macdonald, W.H. Auden, William Maxwell, Saul Bellow, Alfred Kazin, Norman Mailer, and Frank O’Hara.

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    The Three Leaps of Wang Lun: A Chinese Novel

    Alfred Döblin, translated from the German by C.D. Godwin
    Alfred Döblin’s debut work of fiction, the first in western literature to depict Chinese history in great detail and considered by many the first modern German novel, is a dazzling expressionist epic about imperial court life, outcasts, martial arts, religion, and revolution. “I consider Döblin’s 1915 novel, The Three Leaps of Wang Lun, the best contemporary novel by far. It exhibits an entirely superior, most rare, talent. It is true art.” —Max Horkheimer

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    Chinese Rhyme-Prose

    preface by Lucas Klein, translated from the Chinese by Burton Watson
    Burton Watson’s monumental compilation of fu—or, rhyme-prose poetry—is considered one of the most important anthologies of Chinese literature available in English and, until now, has been out of print for decades. The poems, full of abandoned cities, mountainscapes, owls and goddesses, are rendered here in Watson’s masterful English translation for a new generation of readers to enjoy.

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    The Literary Mind and the Carving of Dragons

    Liu Hsieh, translated from the Chinese and annotated by Vincent Yu-chung Shih
    The first comprehensive work of literary criticism in Chinese, The Literary Mind and the Carving of Dragons was written some 1,500 years ago by critic Liu Hsieh whose encyclopedic knowledge of Chinese literature is organized here according to the I Ching. A dazzling, elegant compendium of literary concepts both alien and familiar, Hsieh’s book is indispensable for anyone interested in Chinese literature or in the art of writing itself.

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    Thus Were Their Faces: Selected Stories

    Silvina Ocampo, introduction by Helen Oyeyemi, a new translation from the Spanish by Daniel Balderston, preface by Jorge Luis Borges
    Dark, gothic, fantastic, and grotesque, Ocampo’s stories stand alongside those of her collaborators and countrymen Borges, Cortázar, and Bioy Casares. “Few writers have an eye for the small horrors of everyday life; fewer still see the everyday marvelous. Other than Ocampo, I cannot think of a single writer who … has chronicled both with such wise and elegant humor.” —Alberto Manguel

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    Silvina Ocampo

    Silvina Ocampo, a new translation from the Spanish by Jason Weiss
    Ocampo studied with de Chirico and collaborated with Borges and Bioy Casares. Her poems were celebrated in Argentina but, until now, have been nearly unavailable in English. This selection spans her full career—from early nature sonnets to a late metaphysical turn—and shows her to be adept at “captur[ing] the magic inside everyday rituals” (Italo Calvino).

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    Ending Up

    “I finished Kingsley Amis’s Ending Up with…a conviction, confirmed in work after work, that he is one of the few living novelists totally incapable of boring me. Ending Up is a sardonic little masterpiece which, with incredible economy and stylistic restraint, shows what old age is really like, and also—far, far better than any other writer I know—what contemporary England is like.” —Anthony Burgess

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    Take a Girl Like You

    Kingsley Amis’s most ambitious reckoning with his central theme—the degradation of modern life—Take a Girl Like You introduces one of the rare unqualified good guys in Amis’s rogue-ridden world: Jenny Bunn, a girl from the North English country has come south to teach school in a small smug town where she hopes to find love and fortune.

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    Primitive Man as Philosopher

    Paul Radin, introduction by Neni Panourgiá
    Considered “a minor masterpiece of the Americanist tradition,” Paul Radin’s landmark anthropological study examines thought and religion in an array of aboriginal cultures through first hand accounts and a veritable anthology of poems and songs from the varied traditions. Readers both in and outside of the field will appreciate the rich and varied insights of this classic of anthropology.

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    The Door

    Magda Szabó, a new translation from the Hungarian by Len Rix
    In a prizewinning translation by Len Rix, Magda Szabó’s unsettling and beautiful novel about friendship and tragedy marks Szabó as a major modern European author and formidable writer of female characters. “Clever, moving, frightening, [The Door] deserves to be a bestseller.” —The Telegraph

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    A Memoir of the Warsaw Uprising

    Miron Białoszewski, translated from the Polish by Madeline G. Levine
    Białoszewski, the great Polish poet, memorializes the heroic two-month uprising of the Polish population against their Nazi oppressors in 1944—an operation which saw the slaughter of 200,000 civilians. His memoir rescues a lost story of World War II even as it pays tribute to his and his comrades’ vanished youths. Personal and profound, this memoir brings those harrowing days to vivid life.

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