You'll Enjoy It When You Get There cover

You'll Enjoy It When You Get There: The Stories of Elizabeth Taylor

Elizabeth Taylor, selected and with an introduction by Margaret Drabble

An NYRB Classics Original

Elizabeth Taylor is finally beginning to gain the recognition due to her as one of the best English writers of the postwar period, prized and praised by Sarah Waters and Hilary Mantel, among others. Inheriting Ivy Compton-Burnett’s uncanny sensitivity to the terrifying undercurrents that swirl beneath the apparent calm of respectable family life while showing a deep sympathy of her own for human loneliness, Taylor depicted dislocation with the unflinching presence of mind of Graham Greene. But for Taylor, unlike Greene, dislocation began not in distant climes but right at home. It is in the living room, playroom, and bedroom that Taylor stages her unforgettable dramas of alienation and impossible desire.

Taylor’s stories, many of which originally appeared in ...

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Totempole

Friedman’s psychologically acute and empathetic masterpiece traces the coming-of-age—from two to twenty-four—of a boy growing up on the Lower East Side of New York. “Vivid and utterly convincing…The truth of Mr. Friedman’s book is not the truth of autobiography, but the truth-making that the best fiction is.”—James Dickey

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Conversations with Beethoven

Sanford Friedman, introduction by Richard Howard
Deaf but still able to converse, Beethoven “heard” those around him by means of conversation books in which friends and family jotted down communications. This daring novel, featuring a Dickensian cast, is a fictional reconstruction of these books. In it we see the aging composer struggling with his art, fighting illness, and perpetually worried about the fate of his wayward ward and nephew, Karl.

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The Mad and the Bad

Jean-Patrick Manchette, introduction by James Sallis, translated from the French by Donald Nicholson-Smith
The “French Raymond Chandler” is back with this story of an assassination gone wrong and a manic, murderous cross-country road trip. “For Manchette … the crime novel is no mere entertainment, but a means to strip bare the failures of society, ripping through veils of appearance, deceit, and manipulation to the greed and violence that are the society’s true engines.”—James Sallis, The Boston Globe

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Augustus

John Williams, introduction by Daniel Mendelsohn
Williams’s biographical treatment of the founder of the Roman Empire won him the National Book Award and reveals him to be as transformative a writer of historical novels as he is of westerns (in Butcher’s Crossing) and the campus drama (in Stoner).

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The Captain's Daughter

Alexander Pushkin, introduction by Robert Chandler, translated from the Russian by Robert Chandler and Elizabeth Chandler
At once a fairy tale and a thrilling historical novel of rebellion and romance, this singularly Russian work of the imagination is also a timeless, universal, and very winning story of how love and duty can summon pluck and luck to confront calamity. “The Captain’s Daughter is one of the stories in which Pushkin created Russian prose…. It is true poet’s prose, absolutely clear, objective, unpretentious and penetrating.”—Robert Conquest, The Spectator

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