The Death of Napoleon cover

The Death of Napoleon

Simon Leys, translated from the French by Simon Leys and Patricia Clancy

As he bore a vague resemblance to the Emperor, the sailors on board the Hermann-Augustus Stoeffer had nicknamed him Napoleon. And so, for convenience, that is what we shall call him.
Besides, he was Napoleon… .

Napoleon has escaped from St. Helena, leaving a double behind him. Now disguised as the cabin hand Eugène Lenormand and enduring the mockery of the crew (Na­po­leon, they laughingly nickname the pudgy, hopelessly clumsy little man), he is on his way back to Europe, ready to make contact with the huge secret organization that will return him to power. But then the ship on which he sails is rerouted from Bordeaux to Antwerp. When Napoleon disembarks, he is on his own.

He revisits the battlefield of Waterloo, now ...

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Conversations with Beethoven

Sanford Friedman, introduction by Richard Howard
Deaf but still able to converse, Beethoven “heard” those around him by means of conversation books in which friends and family jotted down communications. This daring novel, featuring a Dickensian cast, is a fictional reconstruction of these books. In it we see the aging composer struggling with his art, fighting illness, and perpetually worried about the fate of his wayward ward and nephew, Karl.

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The Woman Who Borrowed Memories: Selected Stories

Tove Jansson, introduction by Lauren Groff, new translations from the Swedish by Thomas Teal and Silvester Mazzarella
Tove Jansson’s natural mode was the brief tale—whether in her comic strips or Moomin stories, or in her moving compilation of moments from family life on a remote island, The Summer Book. This first, career-spanning collection of her short stories returns to the settings of Jansson’s familiar work and also delves deeper into themes of travel, artistic creation, and the conundrum of living among humans as flawed as oneself.

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The Use of Man

Aleksandar Tišma, introduction by Claire Messud, translated from the Serbo-Croatian by Bernard Johnson
A powerful work that tracks the intertwined lives of a group of high-school classmates in Yugoslavia during WWII: Jew, Nazi, resistance fighter, and cold-blooded killer. “Its power is on a scale normally associated with our favorite (dead) authors…. The world will not look quite the same after you’ve read this book.
Toronto Star

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Thus Were Their Faces: Selected Stories

Silvina Ocampo, introduction by Helen Oyeyemi, a new translation from the Spanish by Daniel Balderston, preface by Jorge Luis Borges
Dark, gothic, fantastic, and grotesque, Ocampo’s stories stand alongside those of her collaborators and countrymen Borges, Cortázar, and Bioy Casares. “Few writers have an eye for the small horrors of everyday life; fewer still see the everyday marvelous. Other than Ocampo, I cannot think of a single writer who … has chronicled both with such wise and elegant humor.” —Alberto Manguel

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The Door

Magda Szabó, introduction by Ali Smith, a new translation from the Hungarian by Len Rix
In a prizewinning translation by Len Rix, Magda Szabó’s unsettling and beautiful novel about friendship and tragedy marks Szabó as a major modern European author and formidable writer of female characters. “Clever, moving, frightening, [The Door] deserves to be a bestseller.” —The Telegraph

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