Augustus cover

Augustus

John Williams, introduction by Daniel Mendelsohn

WINNER OF THE 1973 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD

In Augustus, the third of his great novels, John Williams took on an entirely new challenge, a historical novel set in classical Rome, exploring the life of the founder of the Roman Empire, whose greatness was matched by his brutality. To tell the story, Williams also turned to a genre, the epistolary novel, that was new to him, transforming and transcending it just as he did the western in Butcher’s Crossing and the campus novel in Stoner. Augustus is the final triumph of a writer who has come to be recognized around the world as an American master.

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The Mad and the Bad

Jean-Patrick Manchette, introduction by James Sallis, translated from the French by Donald Nicholson-Smith
The “French Raymond Chandler” is back with this story of an assassination gone wrong and a manic, murderous cross-country road trip. “For Manchette … the crime novel is no mere entertainment, but a means to strip bare the failures of society, ripping through veils of appearance, deceit, and manipulation to the greed and violence that are the society’s true engines.”—James Sallis, The Boston Globe

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Agostino

Alberto Moravia, translated from the Italian by Michael F. Moore
Alberto Moravia’s classic, startling portrait of innocence lost was written in 1942 but rejected by Fascist censors and not published until 1944, when it became a best seller and secured the author the first literary prize of his career.

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The Professor and the Siren

Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa, introduction by Marina Warner, translated from the Italian by Stephen Twilley
In the last two years of his life, the Sicilian aristocrat Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa wrote not only the celebrated novel The Leopard, but also composed three shorter pieces of fiction that show him to be a late-blooming master of the written word. “Lampedusa has made me realize how many ways there are of being alive.”—E. M. Forster

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Last Words from Montmartre

Qiu Miaojin, translated from the Chinese and with an afterword by Ari Larissa Heinrich
The publication of this harrowing and astonishing novel marks the first full-length English translation of a young Taiwanese writer whose life was cut short in the 90s. “Last Words from Montmartre is urgent, ecstatic, unbridled, and breathtakingly intimate. Qiu Miaojin is a writer who truly defies categorization, and this book, her last—part confession, part love letter, part fiction, part memoir, part suicide notes—is a thrilling testament to her original mind and impassioned heart.”—Sarah Shun-lien Bynum

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Fear: A Novel of World War I

Gabriel Chevallier, introduction by John Berger, translated from the French by Malcolm Imrie
Winner of the 2013 Scott Moncrieff Prize for Translation from the French. “Eighty years after it was first published … Gabriel Chevallier’s autobiographical novel about serving in the bombed-out trenches of World War I still chills the blood….Fear is a novel whose most indelible passages describe the sensory degradation of war on the human body…. One of the most effective indictments of war ever written.”—Tobias Grey, The Wall Street Journal

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Fortunes of War: The Levant Trilogy

Olivia Manning, introduction by Anthony Sattin
This sequel to Manning’s Balkan Trilogy follows British nationals Guy and Harriet Pringle as they flee east from the German army’s advance and settle in Egypt. Once again Manning introduces the reader to an unforgettable cast of characters—swindlers, actors, soldiers, and diplomats—and brings to life WWII as it was lived in a grippingly specific place and time.

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