I.F. Stone (1907–1989) was an American journalist and publisher whose self-published newsletter, I.F. Stone’s Weekly, challenged the conservatism of American journalism in the midcentury. A Noncomformist History of Our Times (1989) is a six-volume anthology of Stone’s writings.

The Rights of Gorbachev

In surrendering to Gorbachev’s demands for a Moscow human rights conference in 1991, the American government shut its eyes on two key issues. The first is that the USSR will be able to hold the conference without changing the laws and practices that were responsible for past human rights abuses …

Another Betrayal by Psychiatry?

Seventeen years ago I attacked the World Psychiatric Association in these pages in “Betrayal by Psychiatry”[^1] for refusing to hear complaints from Soviet dissidents, including Andrei Sakharov, about the political abuse of psychiatry in the Soviet Union. The WPA staged a repeat performance a few weeks ago at a regional …

Was There a Witch Hunt in Ancient Athens?

Socrates’ martyrdom and the genius of Plato made him a secular saint, the superior man confronting the ignorant mob with serenity and humor. This was Socrates’ triumph and Plato’s masterpiece. Socrates needed the hemlock, as Jesus needed the Crucifixion, to fulfill a mission. The mission left a stain forever on …

From the Greek

1    Hope is forever stealing the little time life allots us, and our last dawn overtakes us with so many dreams unfulfilled. —Julius Polyaenus of Sardis (1st c. BC) Greek Anthology, Vol. 3, edited by W.R.Paton, (Loeb Classical Library), pp.6-7 2    The Evening Star …

A Shah Lobby Next?

—Washington Since the Shah insists that he has left Iran only for a winter vacation, isn’t there some way for Carter to send him pictures of snowbound Chicago and suggest he try Tahiti? This billionaire refugee spells trouble. The US government has a weakness for lost causes and for …

The Hope

—September 20 By the time this reaches readers about two weeks hence, they and the world will have been on exactly the kind of hair-raising roller coaster that tested the nerves of Center, Sadat, and Begin—and their aides—during Camp David. The newspapers and the radio waves will have been …

Carter, Africa, & Salt

A little history should teach us a little patience in dealing with Africa. When the communists finally won in China a generation ago, their victory was regarded in Washington simply as a Russian takeover. Today communist China is communist Russia’s most fanatical enemy. To glance back for a moment at …

Confessions of a Jewish Dissident

—Washington Abstractly speaking, I should be quite a popular person in the American-Jewish community. I am a dissident. I am also, at a time when the search is on for moderate voices on the Palestine question, a moderate. And I proved my devotion to displaced persons in and out …

The Threat to the Republic

It can be said—but it would be unwise to dwell on it—that the Church and Pike committee reports represent the first time in history any country’s legislature has ever investigated, exposed, and shamed its intelligence agencies and their “dirty tricks.” Long before electronics, as far back as the Rome of …

The Schorr Case: The Real Dangers

One of the first steps in solving a crime is to determine who benefited by it. The chief beneficiaries in the leak of the Pike committee report on intelligence were the intelligence agencies themselves. The report turned up on the CBS evening news Sunday, January 25, and in the first …

Conned in Cambodia

Washington Is Richard Nixon really in San Clemente? Or back in the White House? The Mayagüez affair was handled with that unforgettable Nixon touch. The overwhelming concern behind it was not the safe recovery of the ship’s crew but a fear that prolonged negotiations over it would be “humiliating,” …

A New Solution for the CIA

Stalin did establish one useful precedent. He made it a practice to bump off whoever served as head of his secret police. He never let anybody stay in the job too long. As a successful dictator, Stalin seems to have felt that anybody who had collected so many secrets would …

War for Oil?

—Washington There never was a web so tangled as the oil crisis. If there were no Israel and there were no Arabs there would still have been an oil crisis sooner or later. The era of cheap energy is over, and the adjustment will be painful. When tension becomes …

Mr. Ford’s Deceptions

Washington There is no need to repeat what so many others have said about the charade of Ford’s hearing before the House Judiciary Committee—the time wasted in fulsome obeisance to His Imperial Majesty, the abject thankfulness of the leadership for the privilege of being conned, the subcommittee’s disastrous lack …

The Fix

—Washington The latest chapter of Watergate, the chapter being written by Ford, involves two interrelated matters. One is the pardon for Nixon and perhaps later for his aides. The other involves the disposition of the Nixon tapes and related materials. The full dimensions of this continuing cover-up have yet …

Why Nixon Fears to Resign

—Washington The biggest obstacle to Mr. Nixon’s resignation may be his fear of going to jail. So long as he stays in the White House, he is safe. As President, he has the power to hamper investigation, drag out litigation, and block his own prosecution. He has yet to …

Agnew’s Successor: What Nixon Fears

—Washington Before Congress approves Agnew’s successor, it ought to find out what commitments he may have made to protect Mr. Nixon from the law when the latter leaves office. Everybody has been asking whether, in choosing a successor, Mr. Nixon would be swayed by the good of the country …

The Sakharov Campaign

Andrei Sakharov is no enemy of détente. On the contrary, complete and genuine détente, ideological as well as political coexistence, has been one of the two objectives of the extraordinary campaign he has been waging since 1968. The other is the democratization of the Soviet Union. Sakharov envisaged democratization as …

It Pays to Be Ignorant

The key to successful conspiracy is that the higher-ups do not ask what’s going on, and the lower-downs do not tell them. The recognition of this basic axiom would dispel the fog of pretense which covers the Watergate affair now that the former Attorney General has explained why he thought …

The Washington Power Game

The world has been haunted since World War II by fear of a clash between the United States and the Soviet Union. Yet the Nixon-Brezhnev summit has been greeted almost everywhere with suspicion. There are two reasons for this odd reaction. One lies in the nature of the two powers; …

A Special Supplement: Impeachment

The Federalist Papers explained that the new Constitution allowed for an exception to the doctrine of separation of powers. It provided for “a partial intermixture” in certain special cases. This was defended as “necessary to the mutual defense of the several members of the government against each other.” So the …