Mohsin Hamid lives in Lahore. His new novel, How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, was published this spring.
 (May 2013)


Pakistan: Why Drones Don’t Help

Protesters at a rally against drone attacks, Karachi, Pakistan, May 2011. Their sign says, in Urdu, ‘Oh cruel leaders, allow us to shoot down drones.’

Living Under Drones: Death, Injury, and Trauma to Civilians from US Drone Practices in Pakistan

a report by the International Human Rights and Conflict Resolution Clinic at Stanford Law School and the Global Justice Clinic at the NYU School of Law

Under the Drones: Modern Lives in the Afghanistan-Pakistan Borderlands

edited by Shahzad Bashir and Robert D. Crews
US drones operated by the CIA first struck in Pakistan in July 2004. According to the London-based Bureau of Investigative Journalism (TBIJ), there have now been a total of 367 such strikes. These have reportedly killed between 2,541 and 3,586 people in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA), the seven …

Why They Get Pakistan Wrong

Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani, seated second from right, voicing concern about cuts in US aid at a press conference in Quetta, Balochistan, July 13, 2011. Seated with him are Pakistan’s interior minister Rehman Malik (far left) and Balochistan’s chief -minister Aslam Raisani (far right); above them hang portraits of Raisani, Gilani, President Asif Ali Zardari, and Benazir Bhutto.

The Scorpion's Tail: The Relentless Rise of Islamic Militants in Pakistan—and How It Threatens America

by Zahid Hussain

Pakistan: A Hard Country

by Anatol Lieven
The past decade has been devastating for Pakistan. The country’s annual death toll from terrorist attacks rose from 164 in 2003 to 3,318 in 2009, a level exceeding the number of Americans killed on September 11. Some 35,000 Pakistanis, including 3,500 members of security forces, have died in terror and counterterror violence. Millions more have been displaced by fighting. It is difficult to convey how profoundly the country has been wounded. In 1989, my Lahore American School classmates and I (including children from Pakistan, America, Canada, Sweden, Germany, and Korea) were able to go to the beautiful valley of Swat by bus for a weeklong field trip with no security arrangements whatsoever. In 2009, the battle to retake Swat from Taliban militants involved two full divisions of the Pakistani army and hundreds of casualties among Pakistani soldiers.


A Kennedy for Pakistan?

Imran Khan waves to his supporters during a rally in Lahore, Pakistan, October 30, 2011

In Pakistan there is much talk of democratic ideals, but little love for the country’s current crop of politicians, and so there seems to be a yearning for a new kind of leader able to break the cycle of weakness and mediocrity. Into this situation has surged the former cricket superstar Imran Khan, who in recent months has suddenly become the country’s most popular political figure.