Stephen Kotkin is the John P. Birkelund Professor in History and International Affairs at Princeton and a senior fellow at Stanford’s Hoover Institution. His essay in this issue is adapted from Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929–1941, which will be published in October by Penguin. 
(October 2017)

IN THE REVIEW

Stalin at the Movies

Long focused on the impact of live theater, Stalin did not immediately grasp the full power of film. But the producer Boris Shumyatsky persisted, and goaded the Party to issue a directive to film all major events in the USSR, design handheld cameras to be put into wide production, and …

If Stalin Had Died…

He would do it. Stalin would force the collectivization of Soviet villages and nomadic steppes inhabited by more than 100 million people between 1928 and 1933. At least five million people, many the country’s most productive farmers or herders, would be “dekulakized,” that is, herded into cattle cars and dumped …

On Martin Malia (1924–2004)

Martin Malia, who died on November 19, was one of the great historians of Russia, and he was much more than that. Born in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1924, he became equally at home in Paris, where he lectured for decades and knew such scholars as François Furet and Raymond Aron; …